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TS ALigner Jr.

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Forum topic by electricalD posted 583 days ago 1694 views 1 time favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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electricalD

115 posts in 1706 days


583 days ago

Looking to buy a TS Aligner Jr. Anyone have one that is looking to sell it?

Regards,
Dan P.

-- If there were no God, there would be no atheists, G. K. Chesterton


8 replies so far

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IrreverentJack

724 posts in 1440 days


#1 posted 573 days ago

Dan I just saw one on Ebay. -Jack

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NiteWalker

2699 posts in 1174 days


#2 posted 573 days ago

Those are a waste of money (the table saw aligner jigs). You can get your saw to within .001 with a miter gauge, scrap of wood, and set of $4 feeler gauges. I splurged a bit and spent $10 on a dial indicator from harbor freight.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

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electricalD

115 posts in 1706 days


#3 posted 572 days ago

Hey Jack,

They won’t ship to Canada.

Dan

-- If there were no God, there would be no atheists, G. K. Chesterton

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IrreverentJack

724 posts in 1440 days


#4 posted 572 days ago

Dan, I think Rick and NiteWalker have a point. When I bought my TS Aligner Jr there wasn’t as much good information available as there is now. Search table saw alignment on LJs. Always check out Matthias Wandel’s Woodgears.ca. Ed Bennett’s Table Saw Alignment site and the JR’s instruction video will teach the concepts you need without having to wait the better part of a year and spend close to $200. The TS Jr works great and is a well made tool. Spending the money on it isn’t a waste but I agree it isn’t necessary for good results. Does Harbor Freight ship to Canada?

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electricalD

115 posts in 1706 days


#5 posted 571 days ago

Hey Guys,

I am not an experienced woodworker at all. I have just finished my shop and I haven’t even cut a dovetail yet. But I am very familiar with machinery. I have read through Ed Bennet’s web site and yes the man is a bit on the bold side and yes his tool costs money but I have not seen a solid argument to refute his device. I know that people will argue that you can get good cuts with a saw using the trial and error method or using a device like a dial indicator and a stick and even Ed Bennet admits this can get you to accuracy over time. But I am after accuracy with no doubts and after reading Ed Bennet’s web site, I know that mathematically his device is sound. I don’t want to mess around with a dial indicator on a stick that I have to devise myself or come up with a makeshift way of doing things. I want a device dedicated for the job and something that is accurate the first time. So Jack, if you truly feel that, “there wasn’t as much good information available as there is now”, then are you willing to part with yours? Not to be provocative here but I think Mr. Bennett’s device is accurate and a dedicated device that works.

Regards,
Dan P.

-- If there were no God, there would be no atheists, G. K. Chesterton

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IrreverentJack

724 posts in 1440 days


#6 posted 571 days ago

The TS Jr works great and is a well made tool

When I was trying to improve my old POS saw (15yrs ago?) the most common info/advise I came across was to purchase an aluminium plate that was somehow machined PERFECTLY flat (and could magically stay that way) and use it as a reference when it was attached to the arbor. This was less useful than old car mechanics that would say all you needed to gap plugs and points was a matchbook cover and/or a tooth pick. Discovering Ed Bennett’s products and site was a breath of fresh air. The TS Jr was and might still be the best of that type of tool. My son and I have two of them(they are not for sale). That said, even though his site may have the best information and his products are beautifully conceived and manufactured, purchasing a TS Aligner Jr from Ed can be a PITA. What Rick and NiteWalker suggested is true- There are cheaper ways to to the same job. -Jack

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NiteWalker

2699 posts in 1174 days


#7 posted 571 days ago

Also, keep in mind Dan, that the $130 tsaligner will not get you any closer than a $.05 brass screw.

From Howard Acheson, a woodworking and finishing guru:
“Here is the low tech, low cost way to align a tablesaw that I learned maybe forty years ago and teach to my students now.

Make 3/4×3/4×12” hardwood stick. Drill a hole somewhat centered in one end and insert a brass #8×1” round head wood screw about half way. UNPLUG THE SAW. Raise the blade completely up. Clamp this board in your miter gauge (if you determine that there is some slop in your slot to miter gauge, use a playing card to take up the slop) so the screw head just about touches the blade at the front. Now rotate the blade by hand and determine which tooth is the closest. Adjust the screw in or out until it just touches this tooth. Mark this tooth. Rotate the blade so the tooth is now at the back of the table and move the miter gauge/stick assembly to the back and see if it touches the marked tooth to the same extent. If it doesn’t, adjust the trunnion (if a contractor saw) or the tabletop (if a cabinet saw) until it does.

For a contractor saw, first use a small c-clamp on the rear trunnion and cradle to keep the assembly from moving. Then loosen the two rear trunnion bolts and one front trunnion bolt. Slightly loosen the other front trunnion bolt and use a stick to tap the trunnion until the blade and screw lightly touch. The blade does not move directly around the center so you will need to repeatedly go back to the front of the blade, readjust the screw, and then again measure the back. Be sure to check after tightening the trunnion as the trunnion frequently moves when being tightened.

For cabinet saws, loosen the bolts that hold the tabletop and tap one corner until things come into alignment.

The same adjustment gauge can be used to set the fence parallel to the miter slot. Slide the miter gauge to the front of the table and move the fence over to the screw head and insert a playing card between the screw head and the fence just so you can move the card as it touches both the fence and the screw head. Now move the miter gauge to the back of the table and see if you have the same feel when you insert the card. I like my fence absolutely parallel—if you want to have a slight opening to the fence, you can easily estimate the opening by adding a thickness of paper to the card.

I always show my students with a dial gauge that their adjustments are within .001 – .002.

You can also use the same gauge to measure blade runout by using a $5.00 feeler gauge.

Finally, after you are satisfied with the above adjustments, check the position of the splitter to make sure it is exactly in line with the blade.

Bottom line, there is no need to spend more than the $0.05 for the brass screw. “

Also, get a copy of kelly mehler's The Table Saw Book.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

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RogerInColorado

286 posts in 551 days


#8 posted 547 days ago

I tried to buy one of Ed Bennett’s accurate machinist’s squares a couple of years ago. After no response what-so-ever to three e-mails and 4 phone calls (into an answering machine) It occurred to me that if I needed support after the sale, I would have no way of getting it. I gave up.

Garageworks.com has a super slick way of doing it.

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