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Round over edges or cut dadoes first on oak?

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Forum topic by TopamaxSurvivor posted 12-16-2012 10:54 PM 913 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TopamaxSurvivor

15060 posts in 2420 days


12-16-2012 10:54 PM

Topic tags/keywords: round over edges cut dadoes first oak

Since oak is a bit splintery, would you round over the edges of a board first or cut the dadoes, then round over?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence


9 replies so far

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Mip

337 posts in 822 days


#1 posted 12-16-2012 11:10 PM

If you’re routing the end grain with the roundover, and the dadoes are with the grain, rout the roundover first. This way you won’t tear out the grain on every dado when you cut them. I made a card holder for my Dad with some fancy routed bead around the board, and I did it this way. Hope this makes sense.

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jim C

1455 posts in 1842 days


#2 posted 12-16-2012 11:14 PM

I agree with Mip

-- When I was a boy, I was told "anyone can be President", now I'm beginning to believe it!

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a1Jim

112806 posts in 2321 days


#3 posted 12-16-2012 11:19 PM

Depends where the dado is Bob. If your concerned about tear out on the end-grain. rout the right hand first doing a climb cut(right to left ) just for a couple inches then go back and rout the rest the proper way left to right .

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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TopamaxSurvivor

15060 posts in 2420 days


#4 posted 12-16-2012 11:59 PM

Thanks guys, Guess I should have explained a bit more. There are dadoes 2 1/2” wide across grain on board 66” long. 2 of the dodos will be on the ends and one in the middle. I am mostly concerned about tear out / splintering on the sides when I do the dadoes, if I round over first; but then I’m just a wanna be WWer ;-))

Thanks for the reminder about climb cutting the end grain.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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Karson

34911 posts in 3144 days


#5 posted 12-17-2012 12:01 AM

With a bearing bit you have to be careful that the bearing doesn’t fall into the dado slot because that will mess up the round over. With a fence it isn’t quite the same problem.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

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404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 1713 days


#6 posted 12-17-2012 12:03 AM

You could always clamp a spelch block on to avoid tearout at the ends.

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TopamaxSurvivor

15060 posts in 2420 days


#7 posted 12-17-2012 12:05 AM

I will be using a fence. Thanks for the pointer Karson. Never know when that learning curve mistake would show its ugly face to me ;-)

Good idea Jonathan, I’ll do that.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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TopamaxSurvivor

15060 posts in 2420 days


#8 posted 12-17-2012 12:07 AM

Not sure what a spelch block is? Sort of like using a filler?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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bluekingfisher

1101 posts in 1723 days


#9 posted 12-17-2012 03:24 PM

Bob, I agree with with has been said before. in addition I would think about scoring the edge of the proposed dado cut to further reduce the likelihood of tearout.

Make sure too aned have a backer against the edge you will exit from, this again reduced the “blowout”.

Good luck, let us know how you get on.

David

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan

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