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Forum topic by GUR posted 590 days ago 713 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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GUR

30 posts in 987 days


590 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: boxwood question

Hi all;
I need help and advice. Last year I got a boxwood tronquillos about 8cm in diameter, which had planned to use to make cooking utensils. Once a year has passed I have open in the middle and I have been shocked to see that the wood has gray spots all over the surface. I had already seen before in this type of wood (I think those spots are due to a fungus or something). I blamed a bad wood drying.
In my case I had the wood all year stored in a covered shed, where neither gets wet or gets the sun, and is ventilated, so that I can not have done wrong …
Would greatly appreciate if someone can give me a clue, never to make the same mistake twice. I tried to find some information online or a book and have not found anything …

Anyway, thanks in advance and greetings.

Sorry for the grammatical errors. I wonder speak good English, but the truth is that I can only communicate in this product, through the Google translator, with the limitations that entails …


4 replies so far

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Nomad62

690 posts in 1561 days


#1 posted 589 days ago

The boxwood I have sawn here is a type of maple tree, which stains almost immediately if it is watered when it is wet or fresh sawn; once stained it won’t go away, you need to remove the surface wood until the staining goes away and then a bit more to be on the safe side.

-- Power tools put us ahead of the monkeys

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GUR

30 posts in 987 days


#2 posted 589 days ago

I think we’re talking about different woods. Here the box is a small shrub, whose wood is very dense and heavy, almost like ebony.
It is widely used for small turnings for kitchen cutlery and more.

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Nomad62

690 posts in 1561 days


#3 posted 587 days ago

Yes, definately different. Here in America we have a holly tree, and the wood is very white; but if you cut it down in the late spring thru the late fall it will develop grey or black spots and smears thru the wood from the sap. It needs to be cut in the winter to be the brightest. I do not know if this helps, but I hope so. Best of luck!

-- Power tools put us ahead of the monkeys

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GUR

30 posts in 987 days


#4 posted 587 days ago

I think the same as you. Maybe the problem is because the machine was cut into a wrong time of year. Here say this tree (like many others) should be cut in winter (preferably in January) and waning moon. This year when I cut into that time. We’ll see next year that is.
Thank you very much for your interest.

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