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Inherited Stanley #45 Multiplane Restoration

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Forum topic by WoodenRambo posted 12-15-2012 03:36 AM 2540 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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WoodenRambo

20 posts in 749 days


12-15-2012 03:36 AM

Topic tags/keywords: plane stanley 45 question

Hello fellow lumber jocks. I recently inherited my great grandfather’s stanley #45 (and the good silver seen in the green wraps). As you can see from the pictures it is pretty grimey and has a little bit of rust. Before I soak it in a bath of simple green and take some sand paper to the rails I figured I would post on here for suggestions on cleaning it up.

.

I need to fashion a handle (wood suggestions welcome). Also I have a question about what the little 3 pronged piece is for


8 replies so far

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

1674 posts in 952 days


#1 posted 12-15-2012 03:31 PM

This is a great project for this forum:
‘http://lumberjocks.com/topics/35888
There you will learn just about all you need to know about restoration of old tools. This one is a popular classic.
The little “star” you asked about is a “nicker”. It slices the grain just ahead of the cutter and is supposed to be just about the same as the depth of blade cut. The picture shows considerable wear on the exposed point, probably enough to render it ineffective. The screw can be loosened and the star rotated to expose another point, which may need to be sharpened. The missing point is rotated to the bottom when the nicker is not needed, as in cutting with the grain.
This looks to be a particularly early model. I’ve never seen a Stanley with a split wood handle (tote). Are there any markings to verify the maker? Any blades? if so, take good care of the blade box. Originals are scarce.
DonW is very qualified to help you date this tool, and can identify missing parts. Many parts are available on ebay where a complete “set” brings more $.
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

11328 posts in 1724 days


#2 posted 12-15-2012 08:08 PM

Taking a peek over at supertool.com your 45 appears to be a very early model from looking at the floral print. The original tote and knob were made from rosewood. LJ DonW has ust recently brough a 45 back from the pits of hel, i belive that he used epoxy to secure the handle. Originally, i think, there were screws that pressed against the plate. Ive got a type 4 #71 with the same looking pattern in that arched piece. That would put a date just shy of 1900. Youve got a real stunner there.

I think i might want to date the plane and its vintage prior to cleaning it up.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

View Mosquito's profile

Mosquito

5022 posts in 1010 days


#3 posted 12-15-2012 08:25 PM

That is a really nice #45! A great tool to inherit :-)

This one is a little interesting to me… I think it might be parts from two (or more) different #45’s.

The floral pattern was used up through Type 9 (1908). The fact that the knob is still on the main body, and it’s nickle plated with a cutter adjustment would put it in type 5-6 (1893-1896). The knob doesn’t look original, though.

With that said, however, the fence, and sliding body sections don’t seem to match the main body. Are they japanned black, with brass screws and wing nuts? That would put it type 3 (1888-1889) or earlier. Then it would come down to whether or not the fence has a flat spot on the outside, or if the floral pattern extends the entire length. I can’t see that from the pictures. If you’d be so kind as to post more pictures of these things, I bet we could get it figured out :-)

-

But… as Dan suggested, that thread is a great resource for restoring tools, and a good place to pick up a few techniques. A fellow LJ (Don W) just restored a #45, and I believe he used Cherry for the tote and knob. It looked pretty good. Here’s his blog on it: http://lumberjocks.com/donwilwol/blog/33401

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN -- Stanley #45 Evangelist - www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1411 days


#4 posted 12-15-2012 08:29 PM

This is a gorgeous plane, well worth any effort involved. A trace of the handle should be readily available either here on LJ or elsewhere. You’ll have to ask someone smarter than me about how to mount it. Peening and me don’t get along too well. I agree with Stef that I’d learn a bit more about it before I started putting Brillo to it. It’s certainly more desirable than any 45 I own. There are many schools of thought about how best to restore. I’m an electrolysis guy but others are blasters, evaporusters, navel jelliers, elbow greasers, etc.
.
If you’re not already an avid plane user, you’re choosing a very difficult plane (in my opinion) to start with. The 45 is a bit finicky but please believe me when I say that every hour invested in tuning it will return years of happiness. That’s outside of its sentimental history. Its just an awesome plane and some guys lately have been doing some tremendous work with it.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Don W's profile

Don W

15395 posts in 1285 days


#5 posted 12-15-2012 08:52 PM

On mine they pinned the handle putting 2 pins, one drilled from one side but not all the way through and one from the other, and again not all the way through. I though about doing the same, but re-drilling through the metal so I wouldn’t have to worry about lining up the hidden holes, but I figured epoxy was easier and would hold better anyhow.

yours looks like it may have been different. I’d still epoxy. I’d use rosewood unless your going to replace the knob and fence as well.

making the tote is pretty easy. Note the back of the handle is flat, so you can cut the kerf with the table saw and form around it.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View WoodenRambo's profile

WoodenRambo

20 posts in 749 days


#6 posted 12-15-2012 10:42 PM

More pictures delivered. I am pretty sure the rails are nickle plated, they are just covered in grime.
The screws are brass and the wing nut is almost sheared off. Guess my great g-pa made damn sure that blade was in there tight. :)

Unfortunately I only have the one cutter. It looks to me like the handle was originally pinned through the hole in the middle. I could be completely wrong however. Now just to find a trace of the tote.

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

1674 posts in 952 days


#7 posted 12-15-2012 10:54 PM

Wow! Even I can read THOSE markings! It’s clearly a Stanley and a confirmed early model too, though I don’t have enough experience to give a date range beyond what has already been suggested.

Nice pics. It will be fun to follow this restore. Take good care of it.

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com

View Don W's profile

Don W

15395 posts in 1285 days


#8 posted 12-15-2012 11:03 PM

The tote follows the contour of the steel. Take a look at Mos’s blog, http://lumberjocks.com/Mosquito/blog/32951 he lists the dating references.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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