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Wooden Shift Knob

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Forum topic by TheJ posted 12-13-2012 03:41 AM 1384 views 1 time favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TheJ

2 posts in 1456 days


12-13-2012 03:41 AM

Topic tags/keywords: shift knob birch stain prestain

Hello I’m new here and just wanted get some info I’m a project on working on.

I made a 2” wood (I believe it’s birch) shift knob for a friend and all was going well until I went to stain it. This weird unstained ring appeared around the whole knob. I tried a prestain conditioner which didn’t help.

Any ideas why this is happening and how can I get rid of it or minimize it? I’m not much of a woodworker so any help is appreciated, Thanks for looking.


4 replies so far

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GrandpaLen

1643 posts in 1737 days


#1 posted 12-13-2012 06:15 PM

J,

Welcome to LumberJocks , a world of advise, opinions, and experiences, all shared without judgement.

Are you familiar with the difference in the absorption rate between face grain and end grain?

That lighter area around the center is face grain and the rest of the sphere is end grain, which has more open pores, think of this as a soda straw.

The face grain will not absorb as much stain as the end grain will. You might try staining the lighter area with 2 or more additional coats and see if that darkens that center line.

Work Safely and have Fun. Grandpa Len.

-- Mother Nature should be proud of what you've done with her tree. - Len ...just north of a stone's throw from the oHIo, river that is, in So. Indiana.

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shampeon

1715 posts in 1648 days


#2 posted 12-13-2012 06:25 PM

Closed-pore woods like birch will do that with stains and dyes. Not much you can do about it now. Getting the dye out is tough.

In the future, you can:
  • use a clear sealer, sand back, and then stain/dye
  • use a clear sealer, then a toner coat

In both cases, you’re allowing the end grain to absorb the sealer coat before adding the color. This allows the color to be more even across both the face and end grain.

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

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TheJ

2 posts in 1456 days


#3 posted 12-14-2012 12:07 AM

Thanks guys for the replies.

Len: I did not know that about difference in gains. Thanks for the info.

shampeon: The knob pictured is more or less a mock up. Is there a sealer you would suggest?

Thanks again.

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shampeon

1715 posts in 1648 days


#4 posted 12-14-2012 02:30 AM

Shellac is my first choice. You can buy Zinsser shellac sealer off the shelf that works great. Be sure you get the shellac sealer, it’s cut thinner and is dewaxed.

If you’re doing this on a lathe, just sponge on some shellac, let it dry until hard (15-20 minutes), then sand back with 220.

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

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