LumberJocks

Leg Vice Question

  • Advertise with us

« back to Focus on the Workspace forum

Forum topic by StephenPrunier posted 12-13-2012 03:28 AM 1291 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View StephenPrunier's profile

StephenPrunier

19 posts in 715 days


12-13-2012 03:28 AM

Topic tags/keywords: leg vice leg vice setup attaching leg vice leg vice adjustment rod

I’m in the process of building a new bench. It’s the shaker-style workbench from the Woodsmith Shop Plans. I just ordered the L.N. Leg vice screw and my question is, I have seen two different methods for attaching/adjusting the bottom of the vice. Most have the wood glide and a peg, but others use a steel rod setup. What are the differences in the two? Is one better than the other? Is it a cost factor? With the steel rod setup do you still need to manually adjust it? The drawings that I’m using has the steel rod, but it doesn’t go into any detail about it. I’m taking photos as I go along, so if your all nice, I may share them! :)


12 replies so far

View Sylvain's profile

Sylvain

553 posts in 1153 days


#1 posted 12-13-2012 08:35 PM

Have à look at:
http://www.theenglishwoodworker.com/?p=661
Look also at thé thread workbench smackdown

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/31539
Post 2185 from boatman53

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn

View Don W's profile

Don W

15029 posts in 1221 days


#2 posted 12-13-2012 09:16 PM

there are far mare than 2 ways for sure.

Mine was an after thought, so its different.

Its not a suggestion, just saying you do have options.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View StephenPrunier's profile

StephenPrunier

19 posts in 715 days


#3 posted 12-13-2012 10:40 PM

Thanks. I already watched the video at the English Woodworker. SWEET! That’s what made me consider using that style, as it’s the type in the plans for my bench. It’s not exact, but it looks close.

Don W. Your method looks cool too!

View Brandon's profile

Brandon

4138 posts in 1605 days


#4 posted 12-13-2012 10:48 PM

Check this out as well:

http://lumberjocks.com/reviews/3065

-- "hold fast to that which is good"

View StephenPrunier's profile

StephenPrunier

19 posts in 715 days


#5 posted 12-13-2012 11:03 PM

Iv’e seen that one too. I spent a lot of time going through the bench smack down. Some beautiful benches for sure. I like how the one in my plans looks. But it doesn’t go into any detail so I just wasn’t sure how it works. Just part#’s and how to install it. After watching that video again I think I know how it works, so I think I will go with it.

Thanks again

View Boatman53's profile

Boatman53

839 posts in 850 days


#6 posted 12-14-2012 01:47 AM

Hi Stephen, any way you can share that section of the drawing or give us a link? I like to help, I know what your looking for, but not what you are working with. Thanks all for sharing those links for me.
Jim

-- Jim, Long Island, NY Ancorayachtservice.com home of the chain leg vise

View StephenPrunier's profile

StephenPrunier

19 posts in 715 days


#7 posted 12-14-2012 02:19 PM

I added the link to the plans. I hope it’s alright to do that.
Look at page’s 3 & 12 for the leg vice section. I’m just trying to figure out how it works. Will it glide like the “English Woodworkers” or will I need to take a wrench to it when I need to make adjustments?

Thanks

http://www.woodsmithshop.com/download/601/shaker-style-workbench.pdf

View Sylvain's profile

Sylvain

553 posts in 1153 days


#8 posted 12-14-2012 02:30 PM

To me, it seems you would have to rotate the “knurled knob” to make adjustments.

I would make the knob with a larger diameter to be able to turn it with the foot.

It is not the same system as the “theenglishwoodworker” one.

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9896 posts in 1272 days


#9 posted 12-14-2012 02:35 PM

^ After looking at the link, I second the ‘turn the knurled knob’ opinion. Sylvain nailed it, as usual.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View Boatman53's profile

Boatman53

839 posts in 850 days


#10 posted 12-14-2012 02:57 PM

Sylvains right, that is a threaded rod so you need to spin that lower nut to adjust for parallel. I personally would make the knurled potion bigger and toothed like a sprocket, so it is easier to spin it with your foot.

Edit: here is a link to show what I’m talking about. It is however on a wooden screw but you get the idea.
http://www.popularwoodworking.com/workbenches/schwarz-workbenches/leg-vises-without-the-pin-3-other-solutions
Jim

-- Jim, Long Island, NY Ancorayachtservice.com home of the chain leg vise

View StephenPrunier's profile

StephenPrunier

19 posts in 715 days


#11 posted 12-14-2012 04:51 PM

That’s what I thought. I like the idea of making something bigger so it’s easier to use. I just got everything, but the knurled knob. I guess I can try some different things. Kind of like a dry run. My leg vice screw from L.N. will be here today. So that will be of help too. Once I can see everything it should become clearer to me. I hope! LOL

View Mosquito's profile (online now)

Mosquito

4683 posts in 945 days


#12 posted 12-14-2012 06:14 PM

a fellow LJ and I (Mauricio) were actually just talking about this kind of leg vise. He linked this to me, it’s the same as the first part of the article Jim posted. It’s just all about the bench

http://www.popularwoodworking.com/workbenches/schwarz-workbenches/erik-mortensens-awesome-english-workbench

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN -- Stanley #45 Evangelist - www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase