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Forum topic by jjmill1980 posted 12-10-2012 12:43 AM 1499 views 0 times favorited 27 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jjmill1980

19 posts in 1639 days


12-10-2012 12:43 AM

I am looking into the possibility of making a stand for a hanging cradle/bassinet similar to this one, but out of wood:

I have some ideas on how best to go about this, what are yours (methods, wood type, etc.)?

FYI, I have not built anything that has to do with complex angles or curves. Straight and square has been my motto but I would like to venture out of my square world and need some help!

-- ... I'm lost and enjoying every minute of it


27 replies so far

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Brandon

4138 posts in 1617 days


#1 posted 12-10-2012 12:55 AM

I would find some nice and strong straight grained wood, perhaps oak, and cut it into thin, bendable strips. Glue the pieces together on a mold that match your desired shape. The method is called bent lamination and I’ve used it to make rockers for a couple of rocking chairs and imagine it’d work well for your operation.

-- "hold fast to that which is good"

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jjmill1980

19 posts in 1639 days


#2 posted 12-10-2012 01:08 AM

That is kind of what I was thinking. But, like I said I have never ventured down this path before. So that brings up some more questions:
  • Is Alder a strong straight grained wood? I ask because I have a stack of Alder in my garage (here again, I am just starting to venture out of my previous comfort zones. All of my projects to this point have consisted of dimensional pine and/or MDF so I know very little about “real” wood. I purchased Alder just to have some “real” wood around because it was cheap.)
  • What sort of dimensions would be needed to make this sufficiently strong? (The pictured one is rated for 33 lbs.)
  • The height of the mold would be determined by the width of my lamination. What about the other dimensions of the mold?
  • What kind of wood does the mold need to be made from?

Thanks for the help!

-- ... I'm lost and enjoying every minute of it

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RussellAP

2954 posts in 952 days


#3 posted 12-10-2012 01:30 AM

Ditto Brandon. I’d steam them into place then after they dry in the mold, glue them up. It will be very strong. Oak is recommended. Strips should be 1/16th and you’ll need about 10, 12 if you want to shape the wood.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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RussellAP

2954 posts in 952 days


#4 posted 12-10-2012 01:35 AM

I make my molds from some old particle board. I just double it and use one inch dowels to whatever dimension I want. You can use MDF or plywood if you have that laying around. The key is to get the wood clamped every 2 or 3 inches or where there tends to be a gap. If you clamp it right it will be amazingly strong with little bend.
I’ve never glued up alder so someone else will need to answer that.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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Brandon

4138 posts in 1617 days


#5 posted 12-10-2012 01:42 AM

Russell is spot on. I used MDF to make my mold. You’ll want it as thick to the point where the mold won’t flex. Here’s my rocker mold. It was thick enough to make two rockers on one glue up. Also, for the glue, get plastic resin glue.

-- "hold fast to that which is good"

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Brandon

4138 posts in 1617 days


#6 posted 12-10-2012 01:44 AM

My gut is saying no to the alder, but honestly I don’t have enough experience with that wood to say one way or another. It’s only holding 33 pounds, so that might not be an issue.

-- "hold fast to that which is good"

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jjmill1980

19 posts in 1639 days


#7 posted 12-10-2012 06:27 AM

Russell & Brandon thanks for the info.

What about glueing up walnut? I ask because my wife is not at all a fan of Oak (she likes the darker stuff). Yeah, oak is cheaper and we could just but a dark stain on it. Just exploring options here.

So, if this thing is about 5’ tall that would be a large mold/form compared to Brandon’s and would need 40+ clamps. Do these strips need to be continuous or can they be randomly “spliced” together?

Thanks again for the help!

-- ... I'm lost and enjoying every minute of it

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RussellAP

2954 posts in 952 days


#8 posted 12-10-2012 11:30 AM

You want enough clamps to clamp it together tightly. You can use walnut, it’s a bit more resistant to bending without breaking. for that curve it should hold up okay. You could always use an iron and a wet rag to add some steam to help the bending process.
If you don’t have that many clamps, simply clamp up what you can and then just glue up some more when the first part is dry till you have it all done.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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jjmill1980

19 posts in 1639 days


#9 posted 12-10-2012 02:59 PM

Thanks again Russell.

Do the strips need to be continuous? I am asking because the height of the pictured stand is 66”, so the circumference of a 66” circle is 207”. It appears to me that this is just over half of the circle so I am thinking 1/2 the circumference plus 18-24”. That works out to be 121-127”, which is over 10’. Is it common to find hardwoods over 7-8’?

-- ... I'm lost and enjoying every minute of it

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RussellAP

2954 posts in 952 days


#10 posted 12-10-2012 03:03 PM

You could take some of that length off by modifying the base, use two supports between the two feet and then come out of the back one with the arm. If you do multiple pieces make sure you stagger them by at least a foot.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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jjmill1980

19 posts in 1639 days


#11 posted 12-10-2012 03:33 PM

Great idea Russell.

I just watched a youTube video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mO5iiaYeX4E) where the guy used Gorilla Glue and stretch wrap instead of clamps. It appears he uses screws into a sheet of MDF to hold the wrapped pieces of wood in the shape he wants. Any one ever try this before? What are your thoughts? Is Gorilla Glue more visible in the finished product?

-- ... I'm lost and enjoying every minute of it

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RussellAP

2954 posts in 952 days


#12 posted 12-10-2012 03:36 PM

I use Titebond II. Give the shrink wrap a try.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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jjmill1980

19 posts in 1639 days


#13 posted 12-10-2012 03:43 PM

The guy in the video said normal yellow and white glues wouldn’t dry inside of the shrink wrap. Although, how does it dry when it is “sealed” between two pieces of wood?

-- ... I'm lost and enjoying every minute of it

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jjmill1980

19 posts in 1639 days


#14 posted 12-10-2012 04:33 PM

Jonathan, thanks for the pics!

I had thought of using a tie down strap, but my first thought was to wrap it around the piece and the form, which wouldn’t work well, and not along the curve. I think that this would work great since I don’t have 40+ clamps that would be necessary to clamp every 2-3”.

-- ... I'm lost and enjoying every minute of it

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casual1carpenter

353 posts in 1141 days


#15 posted 12-10-2012 04:40 PM

I found this blog post, seems very detailed to me and might be worth a look for you.

http://lumberjocks.com/bfd/blog/6226

He has a light stand pictured towards the bottom of the blog that might offer some insight into your project. However I would look at increasing the base width and decrease the attachment extension arm area to achieve a better center of gravity, a light is not a baby and we don’t want mama mad.

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