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6’’ Dust Port / Planer / Where to get?

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Forum topic by rustynails posted 12-09-2012 10:03 PM 1506 views 1 time favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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rustynails

463 posts in 1183 days


12-09-2012 10:03 PM

I have a Grizzly G0453Z planer and a G0490X jointer and have been installing my new dust collection system and realized that the 4’’ ports on the manufactures hoods are too small. I guess I never realized until now as I never hooked them up before. Does anyone know if there are any aftermarket manufactures of these hoods with 6’’ ports or where I could get one for each unit?

Thanks


11 replies so far

View sandhill's profile

sandhill

2122 posts in 2578 days


#1 posted 12-09-2012 10:57 PM

I have the 20” and 8” Griz also. I was going to just use a reducer. I don’t think that would be any problem.

-- Bob Egbert AKA Sandhill http://www.sandhillwoodworks.com/

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pmayer

573 posts in 1719 days


#2 posted 12-10-2012 12:34 AM

They are quite easy to make for the jointer. You can see a simple design here, which I have installed on your exact jointer and it works perfectly: https://www.wwgoa.com/articles/projects/hook-up-tools-for-better-dust-collection/

The planer is a bit trickier but can be done as well. I just use a reducer (I run 6” right to the dust hood and have only a few inches of 4”), and with that setup I can still pull 850 CFM which is adequate. I am sure I would get better collection with a true 6” port with no 4” bottleneck, however, particularly since upgrading to an 18” planer.

-- PaulMayer, http://www.vernswoodgoods.com

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rustynails

463 posts in 1183 days


#3 posted 12-10-2012 01:08 AM

Thanks for the link pmayer that should work nicely for my jointer.
sandhill / pmayer I guess a reducer shouldn’t hurt two much as it only a few inches and you still have most of the suction of the 6’’ pipe.

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pmayer

573 posts in 1719 days


#4 posted 12-10-2012 01:29 AM

I think you will be pleased with it. If not, you can alway fabricate a hood with a 6” port. Just as a point of comparison, when I remove the reducer and measure the CFM at the end of the line I get about 1100 CFM, so I am losing 250 CFM or about 23%. In practice, I would guess that I get well over 99% debris capture and never have a problem with clogging. I have never measured air quality in my shop, and I suspect that it would be better if I were using a 6” pipe all the way through, but I never notice any problem.

-- PaulMayer, http://www.vernswoodgoods.com

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rustynails

463 posts in 1183 days


#5 posted 12-10-2012 01:53 AM

I am installing a Oneida pro 2000 Cyclone 5hp. I am running a 8’’ main then 6’’ in the whole shop but using 4’’ flex to about ½ the machines off a 6’’ line and then using 6’’flex off of a 6’’ pipe on the big ones 15’’ planer, 8’’ jointer, 38’’ drum sander. Thanks for your help.

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pmayer

573 posts in 1719 days


#6 posted 12-10-2012 02:12 AM

You are going to pull some serious CFM with that setup. If you keep your 4” sections really short I bet you can have CFM in the 1000 range on the 4” ports. And on your 6” ports you better make sure all the bolts are tight on your tools because anything that isn’t torqued down will be in the fiber drum the first time you open that gate.

-- PaulMayer, http://www.vernswoodgoods.com

View Vrtigo1's profile

Vrtigo1

432 posts in 1645 days


#7 posted 12-10-2012 02:29 AM

One thing to check is how wide the “dust chute” inside the jointer is. I have the G0490 as well and as I recall there is a channel inside the base made out of sheet metal that carries the chips from below the cutter head to the side where the dust port is located. If that is small then upgrading to a 6” port might not get you very much of a payoff.

View sandhill's profile

sandhill

2122 posts in 2578 days


#8 posted 12-10-2012 05:24 AM

I don’t think you will have a problem with 4” ports at the machine and it will pull what you need. Remember they are designed and come with 4” ports if you needed more it would have come that way 6”,8” 10”. I used a single bag delta 1200 with 1 four inch port for years before I got my 2000 and that did the job fine from 10 feet away even on the 20” planer. Now I will run a 8” main trunk with all 6” drops to the machines and some have 2.5” split off to the top of my router table and a few swing arm vacuum lines. I had an engineer friend do some quick math and he seems to think it will be all I need. On the other hand you may have longer runs, I am only running less then 60’ feet total.

-- Bob Egbert AKA Sandhill http://www.sandhillwoodworks.com/

View RogerM's profile

RogerM

445 posts in 1053 days


#9 posted 12-10-2012 02:08 PM

I have a Delta 15” D-380 planer which has a 5” dust chute. I put a 5” to 4” reducer on it leading into a 4” hose. This arrangement works fine and has only plugged once (multiple 14” wide pine boards).

-- Roger M, Aiken, SC

View pmayer's profile

pmayer

573 posts in 1719 days


#10 posted 12-10-2012 05:21 PM

Sandhill,

I respectfully disagree with your assertion that whatever tool port ships with the tool is the right one. Some vendors (Festool is a good example) are waking up to this an designing solid dust collection in up front, but in general the dust collection designs on most tools is woefully inadequate. Some are borderline adequate depending on how you configure your ducting, and some are worthless. As one simple example, my 18” planer is hooked up as I described above (6” pipe reduced to 4” at the hood), and with 850 CFM it is decent but it could be better. When I hooked up the same tool using a different 4” line, this one having about 10 feet of flex tube, my CFM dropped to 550 and the collection was miserable. Keep in mind that 550 CFM (actual, not theoretical) is better than you would get by placing a 1 HP dust collector right next to the planer with a short run of hard pipe. So, in this case, it would be much easier for me to get adequate collection with a 6” connection, or a pair of 4” connections.

Another example is my band saw which has a 2.5” port that collects almost nothing. By cutting a hole in the front and configuring a 4” port, I get much better collection. Not perfect, but much better.

On other tools, however, I think you are right. At my jointer I get 1000 CFM through the 6” port, but in this case I suspect that I could get by with a lot less CFM and a 4” pipe because the volume of debris is small coming off of an 8” cutter, and it is producing less fine dust. I just upgraded to 6” there because it was simple, cheap, and I figured I would make sure I had maximum draw on the tool.

-- PaulMayer, http://www.vernswoodgoods.com

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

1784 posts in 1147 days


#11 posted 12-10-2012 05:58 PM

I agree with Paul on the port size as well. The puny factory ports, at times, seem to me to only satisfy a tool description line that says “dust hookup provided” or some such nonsense. They certainly aren’t designed for maximum dust collection. On my drum sander, I completely removed the drum cover/dust port and replaced it with a shop built one. Not pretty at all, but I now have a 6” port to use.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, we sent 'em to Washington.

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