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unisaw help plz

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Forum topic by danjo posted 580 days ago 844 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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danjo

20 posts in 680 days


580 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question

I bought a delta unisaw on CL recently. It has a 3 HP motor and seems to be in decent shape. I replaced the belts and gave it a good once over. I found that the blade was not 90 degrees to the table top. So I replaced the blade hoping this would work. It did not. The next thing I did was adjust the stop bolt under the table on the castings. However, I could not get the blade to 90 even with the stop bolt taken off. I think the arbor on the saw may be bent slightly. Does this seem like the most likely problem? Thanks for your opinions.

-- http://cookcontracting.webs.com/


10 replies so far

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toolie

1714 posts in 1214 days


#1 posted 580 days ago

so check the arbor for runout. get a $10 machinist dial gauge @ harbor freight and you’ll know pretty quickly if that’s the problem. FTR, i NEVER use the stops on any of my table saws. too many opportunities for sawdust and foreign matter to affect the setting.

on the unisaw, make sure there’s nothing in the teeth on the bevel rod or the teeth on the trunion. also, you noted you replaced the belts. as those motors weigh ~ 50-60 lbs and are a PITA to remove and reinstall, especially with the table on the cabinet, how did you replace them? did you accidently skip a tooth or two on the bevelling mechanism without realizing it?

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

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danjo

20 posts in 680 days


#2 posted 580 days ago

When I replaced the belts I didnt need to remove motor I just loosened the set bolt releasing the tension on the belts. Then I squeezed the new belts between the motor pulley and the rod that raises the blade. It was a bit of a puzzle but they fit through. How do you check for runout?

-- http://cookcontracting.webs.com/

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Wdwerker

331 posts in 818 days


#3 posted 580 days ago

Caked dust in the teeth or on the stops could be the problem. Or the tabletop might be bolted on tilted to one side.
I bet you could use some metal thin shim stock to bring one side of the table up until it was square to the blade.

-- Fine Custom Woodwork since 1978

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Wdwerker

331 posts in 818 days


#4 posted 580 days ago

Caked dust in the teeth or on the stops could be the problem. Or the tabletop might be bolted on tilted to one side.
I bet you could use some metal thin shim stock to bring one side of the table up until it was square to the blade.

-- Fine Custom Woodwork since 1978

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toolie

1714 posts in 1214 days


#5 posted 580 days ago

How do you check for runout?

like this:

http://www.newwoodworker.com/basic/tsalign.html

see fourth section, “Start at the Blade”

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

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MedicKen

1599 posts in 2047 days


#6 posted 580 days ago

How far off of 90 degrees are you? It may take a few small shims in one or more corners of the table and cabinet to move it. I would first check that there is not any sawdust build up in the worm gear and in the trunnion itself. The trunnion cleaning will require a complete removal of the top.

-- My job is to give my kids things to discuss with their therapist....medic20447@gmail.com

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danjo

20 posts in 680 days


#7 posted 580 days ago

I measure about 1/32 gap near the top of the blade on the left side. It is the same exept gapped at the bottom of the blade on the right side. Im not sure how many degrees this is maybe 5 or so? Its far enough that I cant bring a cut straight to a glue up. I cleaned the castings and didnt seem to help. The casting that moves when adjusting a bevel is actually hitting the trunnion when I try to zero the saw. It is hitting very very close to 90, just not all the way. I have also considered shimming the table but it seems to need about 3/16 or more when it runs out that far.

-- http://cookcontracting.webs.com/

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MedicKen

1599 posts in 2047 days


#8 posted 580 days ago

The arbor is hitting the stationary portion of the trunnion assembly? If that is true, the arbor is driven on to the pivot too far. In the pic below there should be a gap of about 1/2” between the arbor and the casting. The arbor should be flush on the pivot point.

-- My job is to give my kids things to discuss with their therapist....medic20447@gmail.com

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Fred Hargis

1614 posts in 1078 days


#9 posted 580 days ago

Did you consider the shims on both sides of the table…one side up, the other down? Sometimes when folks take the top off they mistake the shims for washers, and put them back in (or not) in a random order, rather than keeping track of which one goes to what corner.

-- I long for the days when Coke was a cola, and a joint was a bad place to be (Merle Haggard)

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Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1744 days


#10 posted 579 days ago

There should be plenty of leeway between the stops to NOT require shimming of the table. Either the stops are adjusted too tight, there is a bad arbor bearing, or there is an obstruction, which could be dust in the threads or something hitting the motor when tilting.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

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