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Is it me or the jointer that has a problem?

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Forum topic by rlrobinhood posted 12-05-2012 03:08 AM 1192 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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rlrobinhood

78 posts in 1392 days


12-05-2012 03:08 AM

Hi all,

(I’m a beginner woodworker) I have a Rockwell 37-290. Its an old 4” jointer that I think is built pretty well. But, its used (new to me) and I recently spent some time on it. By this I mean I cleaned it up and tuned it. I beleive all my tolerances (tables paralell, coplanar, knives, etc.) are .003 or less.

So now, when I edge joint two boards (18”), it looks AWESOME!!!! I thought I had it dialed in. I can hold the boards together and up to the light and no light. Tight joints, awesome….. or so I thought.

So, last night I started making a wood whisperer type cutting board, you know where you glue together alternating wood strips as one of the first steps. Well, I cut one strip about .25” too wide (I know, measure twice, cut once). But, I thought no big deal, I’ll just use the jointer to shave it down to the width I need. Well, when I was done, one end of the board was the width I needed and the other was not.

After experimenting, I found that the leading edge is cutting more wood off than the trailing edge. Not really noticable, unless you do many multiple passes. So, my question is, is this a result of poor technique (ie me) or did I miss something in my tune up?

Thanks in advance for the help.


22 replies so far

View getlostinwood's profile

getlostinwood

224 posts in 1348 days


#1 posted 12-05-2012 03:17 AM

In my experience the jointer, when running multiple passes will create a wedge, which sound like what you are describing. For the two faces to be paralell a job for the planer or thickness sander. You wont make this mistake more than 3000 times if your anything like me.

-- The basis for optimism is shear terror

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2966 posts in 1032 days


#2 posted 12-05-2012 03:20 AM

I misunderstood at first. You’re running the boards through a joiner like a planer right, flat side down?
If so, use a planer. I only use the joiner for the sides of lumber to square it up for the miter saw. When you plane with it, it comes out wavy as heck. I’d have to see the board you’re trying to cut.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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Moron

4723 posts in 2639 days


#3 posted 12-05-2012 03:26 AM

it might not be you ?

if I was a newbie i would focus on “a jointer can only make 2 straight, parallel lines being 1 face and 1 edge”

rip on TS parallel line and re-joint ripped edge on jointer,, faces go through a planer after edges are glued up

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View rlrobinhood's profile

rlrobinhood

78 posts in 1392 days


#4 posted 12-05-2012 03:27 AM

getlostinwood is describing exactly what I’m experiencing. I’m making many passes on the edge of the board. The result is a board that is 18” long, 1” thick, and 2” wide at one end and 1” wide at the other. This is an exageration, of course, but the defference in width between the two ends is very noticable.

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2966 posts in 1032 days


#5 posted 12-05-2012 03:29 AM

The board could have a slight twist or bow.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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Grandpa

3203 posts in 1421 days


#6 posted 12-05-2012 03:32 AM

Sounds like technique problems. Make sure the knives are the same height on each end. This will also cause this problem.

View Paden501's profile

Paden501

35 posts in 1096 days


#7 posted 12-05-2012 03:37 AM

It sounds like you’re ‘creating a wedge’ with the jointer. This isn’t too uncommon when you make multiple passes on the same face.

Remember that a jointer makes a straight face on a board in relation to the table, and 1 square corner when using the fence. It does not necessarily make 2 ‘parallel’ faces just because you ran both of them across the table. For that task you need to use the thickness planer.

I suggest for your scenario, you should joint 1 edge of the wood, and then one face, and use TS to cut the width (or the thickness planer to adjust thickness) of your board.

View Randy_ATX's profile

Randy_ATX

692 posts in 1188 days


#8 posted 12-05-2012 03:45 AM

I had a previous post pretty similar to yours. See if any of this info is helpful:
http://lumberjocks.com/topics/40554

-- Randy -- Austin, TX by way of Northwest (Woodville), OH

View Alongiron's profile

Alongiron

435 posts in 1439 days


#9 posted 12-05-2012 03:49 AM

Try this…lay your framing square on the outfeed side of your jointer leaving the end of the square above your blades..when adjusting your outfeed table; the blades should just touch the bottom side of the square…you are now set up correct. Make sure that your fence is square to your blades and table. Now when you joint your wood; keep pressure on the front of the piece that you are jointing….the outfeed side and you should be good to go!

-- Measure twice and cut once.....Steve Lien

View rockinmichael's profile

rockinmichael

34 posts in 1130 days


#10 posted 12-05-2012 03:57 AM

A lot of people do not know it, but a jointer usually will taper workpieces, not remove even amounts of materials from each side. Alternatively, you could simply reset the rip fence and trim off the extra quarter inch.

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rockinmichael

34 posts in 1130 days


#11 posted 12-05-2012 03:57 AM

A lot of people do not know it, but a jointer usually will taper workpieces, not remove even amounts of materials from each side. Alternatively, you could simply reset the rip fence and trim off the extra quarter inch.

View rlrobinhood's profile

rlrobinhood

78 posts in 1392 days


#12 posted 12-05-2012 04:04 AM

Very good points here, thanks guys. But, I do have some follow up questions to make sure I’m understanding correctly….

First, good to think about the basics, a jointer can do two sides and the corresponding 90-degree. So, take the cutting board out of the equation and lets just say I have a board that is approxiamately 18” long, 4”wide, and 1.25” thick. Say I run on face (2”wide) through the jointer and then put this face up against the fence and run the edge through. If my jointer is perfectly set up, I should have two flats (one face and one edge) and a 90-degree between them. Am I right so far?

OK, if so, then say the board is now 18” long, 3.75” wide and 1” thick. Now, I rip it though a well tuned table saw to 3” wide. The net result should be two parallel edges that are exactly 3” apart on both ends.

If I then took this board over to my jointer and ran the same edge (1” thick) through 30 times in the same direction, are you saying that it should be expected that the edges are no longer paralell and that a wedge shape is being formed?

Thanks again in advance, if I’m correct in the above, I’m glad I learned this early.

View Randy_ATX's profile

Randy_ATX

692 posts in 1188 days


#13 posted 12-05-2012 04:18 AM

OK, if so, then say the board is now 18” long, 3.75” wide and 1” thick. Now, I rip it though a well tuned table saw to 3” wide. The net result should be two parallel edges that are exactly 3” apart on both ends.
Correct.
If I then took this board over to my jointer and ran the same edge (1” thick) through 30 times in the same direction, are you saying that it should be expected that the edges are no longer paralell and that a wedge shape is being formed?
If your jointer is setup properly and your technique is correct this is NOT true IMO. Of course the more times you joint in a row the more potential for error to grow, however after ripping on the TS you should only need to joint that edge once or twice IMO. My table saw cuts so smooth its hard to tell the jointed edge from the ripped edge.

-- Randy -- Austin, TX by way of Northwest (Woodville), OH

View Birks's profile

Birks

109 posts in 975 days


#14 posted 12-05-2012 04:19 AM

It’s not you. That is what a jointer does:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5af_yZQHo8k

View Straightbowed's profile

Straightbowed

717 posts in 1044 days


#15 posted 12-05-2012 04:24 AM

the jointer dont measure it only makes it straight

-- Stevo, work in tha city woodshop in the country

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