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First cutting board - Take me to school!

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Forum topic by JSB posted 503 days ago 754 views 1 time favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JSB

659 posts in 581 days


503 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: cutting board

So I just got my Dewalt 735 and am dying to throw some wood through it. I also had to demo a kitchen today for a remodel and salvaged a boat load of poplar from the face frames. I was thinking of reclaiming it to make a simple cutting board for my first hardwood project. I need some do’s and don’ts on cutting boards. Minimal/optimal thickness? Tightbond II or III? Good oil to finish with? Is poplar even a good choice for this? I normally attempt a project and learn from my mistakes but I figured I could come into it a little more prepared. After all, thats one of the many benefits of LumberJocks. Feel free to respond as if I have never picked up a tool. This is a simple project…help me not ruin it :)

Any and all help, advice, dont do this, and why you are an idiot is welcomed :)

Thanks!

-- Jay - http://www.jayscustomcreations.com or http://www.woodworkingwithsketchup.com


8 replies so far

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BTimmons

1904 posts in 988 days


#1 posted 503 days ago

Can’t help with most of the questions, but I do know this. If you make an end grain board, do NOT send glued up end grain boards through a planer. A loud bang, flying chunks of wood and a possibly damaged planer will ensue.

-- Brian in Arlington, TX

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joein10asee

2763 posts in 510 days


#2 posted 503 days ago

I used Titebond 2 tilll about a year ago and switched to the 3. It seems to hold better (my opinion). As to where to start? Just cut some of the boards into strips and try flipping every other one, or every third one till you see something you like (that’s pleasing to the eye).
Glue ‘em up and clamp e’m. Let ‘em dry overnight and run it thru the planer.
I use a Butcher block treatment that has beeswax in it (it also smells like honey) for the first few coats. For renewing the coating I tell the folks I give them to that they can use simple mineral oil (yes, like your mom used to pour down your throat for “bowel movement issues” LOL
Sometimes I glue 6 or 8 feet of contrasting color woods 1” and 2” wide and then cut different shapes from the long-board. Usually they’re 12” overall wide. I have patterns for house, barn, several motorcycles, fish, cow, several pigs, and sometimes I just cut the ends at an angle (parallel-o-gram)

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

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joein10asee

2763 posts in 510 days


#3 posted 503 days ago

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View joein10asee's profile

joein10asee

2763 posts in 510 days


#4 posted 503 days ago

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

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JSB

659 posts in 581 days


#5 posted 503 days ago

Interesting shapes. I dont quite understand pic #3. What is that supposed to be?

-- Jay - http://www.jayscustomcreations.com or http://www.woodworkingwithsketchup.com

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joein10asee

2763 posts in 510 days


#6 posted 503 days ago

You mean the one between Texas and the chicken? It’s the shilloutte of my Honda Gold WIng. The first one I made didnt give much room to actually CUT on, so I added the wider part that extends from the wheels down. At the top is about 10” wide and it’s overall about 12” high.
If you look close at the pic with the wood clamped, you can see where I penciled in the GoldWing shape. But when I cut it out, the “body” of the motorcycle leaves little room for cutting

Here’s the first two motorcycles I made (before I increased the size for more cutting room.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

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derosa

1474 posts in 1339 days


#7 posted 503 days ago

I find 3/4in the thinnest I will go and base it on size for what feels comfortable for me. Usually anything in the 10-14” length I try to do 7/8-1”, shorter I’ll drop to 3/4”, longer I’ll go 1 1/8”, end grain I bump everything up for thickness. I feel that it helps to give the board a balance of size.
I’ll use titebond II or III, which ever bottle happens to be nearest to hand.
Finish has always been mineral oil for me, fairly cheap at the drug store, been meaning to try adding bee’s wax but don’t have it readily available.
Design is whatever you like, I prefer end grain but not the extra gluing. I keep a stack of boards that are nothing but scrap wood laid out in the most pleasing order I could figure out for emergency gifts. Keeps down the scrap.

-- --Rev. Russ in NY-- A posse ad esse

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Monte Pittman

10844 posts in 841 days


#8 posted 503 days ago

You have to ruin at least one like the rest of us :-)

Glued up long grain works in planer. Once you cut and glue for end grain, nooooooooo planer. At least not without the risk of severe bodily injury.

The great thing about them is that you can let your imagination run for designs. I use TB3.

Good luck.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it. - It's not ability that we often lack, but the patience to use our ability

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