LumberJocks

Cutting Board Care

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by Mark Smith posted 12-01-2012 06:10 PM 857 views 1 time favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Mark Smith's profile

Mark Smith

497 posts in 707 days


12-01-2012 06:10 PM

I’m making some cutting boards to sell and I’d like to print up little cards to go with them telling people how to care for their cutting boards. I’m only going to put mineral oils and beeswax on them so I’m looking for suggestions of things to put on the card. Here’s what I have so far, let me know what I should add or change:

1. Do not put your cutting board in the dishwasher, handwash only.
2. Do not let your cutting board sit in water or other fluids for any length of time. It can get wet, but towel dry it as soon as possible and store it in a dry location.
3. Apply a new coat of mineral wax every six months or as needed to keep your board in the best shape.

And what else should I add or reword?

-- Mark Smith, Tracy, CA., http://www.markscustomwoodcrafts.com


14 replies so far

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1825 days


#1 posted 12-01-2012 06:47 PM

I would put a word or two about safety…be sure to use the board on a flat surface and, as always, be careful when using cutting instruments.

I’d also be sure they know not to use other cleaners.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View Mark Smith's profile

Mark Smith

497 posts in 707 days


#2 posted 12-01-2012 07:18 PM

Yeah I guess you need to put those legal disclaimers in there too. 4. Knives are sharp, do not use them to cut your fingers off on this board!

-- Mark Smith, Tracy, CA., http://www.markscustomwoodcrafts.com

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112170 posts in 2244 days


#3 posted 12-01-2012 07:32 PM

Good Idea to include the care and feeding of their new cutting board. Just wondering did you mean Mineral oil instead of mineral wax?

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Mark Smith's profile

Mark Smith

497 posts in 707 days


#4 posted 12-01-2012 07:37 PM

Yes I did. I put mineral oil and beeswax on them so it’s easy to get confused in my old age. :)

-- Mark Smith, Tracy, CA., http://www.markscustomwoodcrafts.com

View rockindavan's profile

rockindavan

283 posts in 1303 days


#5 posted 12-01-2012 07:39 PM

I’d say not to cut meat on them

View foodog's profile

foodog

25 posts in 2093 days


#6 posted 12-01-2012 08:11 PM

Do NOT set hot pans on them

-- Stan from St. Paul Mn

View Mark Smith's profile

Mark Smith

497 posts in 707 days


#7 posted 12-01-2012 08:17 PM

Hot pans is a good one, but why not cut meat? I thought that was what they were mainly for and the entire reason for the drip channel. I haven’t put a drip channel in one yet, but my next one will have it.

-- Mark Smith, Tracy, CA., http://www.markscustomwoodcrafts.com

View jap's profile

jap

1231 posts in 721 days


#8 posted 12-01-2012 08:23 PM

don’t say “not to put hot pans on” cause then, hopefully, they will put a hot pan on it and put scorch marks on the board and it will look ugly…so they will buy another board from you :)

-- Joel

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2833 posts in 915 days


#9 posted 12-02-2012 12:18 AM

Why no hot pans? Because of the wax? plenty of people make wooden trivets.

I’d add that it should be stored on edge whenever possible.
Recoat with mineral oil when the board looks dull. If you did the wax right, you probably will never need to do that again. Trust me, check out my thread on how to remove a mineral oil/wax finish from a board. After planing down a quarter of it’s height and taking a belt sander with 36 grit paper to it, I gave up.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View Mark Smith's profile

Mark Smith

497 posts in 707 days


#10 posted 12-02-2012 12:22 AM

The question was why no cutting meat on it. I understand the hot pans.

-- Mark Smith, Tracy, CA., http://www.markscustomwoodcrafts.com

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2833 posts in 915 days


#11 posted 12-02-2012 12:35 AM

Myths and urban legends. I’ve made my wife 3 or 4 boards. Every single one of them has been used for some kind of meat at one time or another. If you do cut meat, avoid open grained wood like oak and ash.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

1337 posts in 924 days


#12 posted 12-02-2012 01:27 AM

I try to put a positive spin on things:
1. To best preserve your new cutting board wash with soap and warm water immediately after use and dry with a soft towel, no need for the dish washer.
2. Apply mineral oil when the board looks dry or dull.
3. Some people choose to use one side for meat and the reverse side for vegetables.
4. You might prefer to use one side for cutting/chopping and keep the face for display.

FWIW

-- Art

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3393 posts in 1480 days


#13 posted 12-02-2012 03:33 AM

I would recommend Howards butcher block conditioner. It is a blend of mineral oil and soft wax.
Recommending a specific product could be helpful.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Mark Smith's profile

Mark Smith

497 posts in 707 days


#14 posted 12-03-2012 12:55 AM

Thanks guys. I have everything I need. I got a nice list via email that some other users on here had put together.

-- Mark Smith, Tracy, CA., http://www.markscustomwoodcrafts.com

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase