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Help With Hand Plane Refinishing

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Forum topic by groy87 posted 607 days ago 1247 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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groy87

126 posts in 1437 days


607 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: hand plane question tip plane refurbishing

So I’m in the process of refinishing 4 hand planes a Bailey #4,6, block plane, and bull nose rabbet plane. On the #4 and 6 there is pitting as shown in the picture. Ideally I would like to sand down until the pits are removed but I am worried about removing too much material and ruining the hand plane. My question is that will the presence of these pits cause significant problems or will it have negligible effects?

Additionally I’ve trued up the bottom and sides of the block plane but while sanding I realized that towards the end of each side has a slight taper at the last 1/8-1/4 inch of the side. Is this normal in block planes or will this be a problem?


8 replies so far

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

1465 posts in 832 days


#1 posted 607 days ago

The taper you describe is typical wear for a heavily used old plane. Most users drag the plane on the back stroke lifting the rear a bit sometimes and that is probably what caused these worn marks. These are largely harmless because they are small, but you could continue until the sole is completely flat without thinning noticeably.

If you sand until the pits are gone, you will be an old man before you get done. There are experts out there that argue for and against pit removal. On the inexpensive planes you have, if they were mine, I would arrest the rust development, remove what rust is in the pits chemically (Evaporust?) and use wax to prevent future rust.

Check out the hand plane restoration forums and take advantage of the links to references for COMPLETE restoration and tune up tips. Too much info for here.
Good luck,
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com

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Dan Krager

1465 posts in 832 days


#2 posted 607 days ago

Here is the one reference I was thinking of. It’s on the restoration forum.
http://timetestedtools.wordpress.com/bench-plane-restore-the-dw-way/

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com

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groy87

126 posts in 1437 days


#3 posted 607 days ago

I’ve been looking at those forums and links before I attempted to refinish the planes so I know what you’re referring too. The slight taper is not on the sole but the sides of the base.

I have to say I went a bit overboard on the rust removal lol. I used evaporust and naval jelly to remove the extensive rust coating :P.

Whenever I am done sanding or handling the planes I coat them with wd40. Will that be just as effective as using wax?

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paratrooper34

760 posts in 1550 days


#4 posted 607 days ago

Groy87, the tapers you describe on your block plane are normal for some types. I used to have one exactly like that. The only downside to that style body is it is difficult to use them for cleaning up rabbets or other profiles where a 90 degree angle is encountered. But for regular service as a block plane, that style works just fine. Additionally, the pitting you describe won’t affect performance. Just clean it up best you can and put it to use. I have a couple of planes that have some minor pitting left after cleaning them up and it does not affect the performance whatsoever.

Good Luck and hope to see you putting them to use.

-- Mike

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Dan Krager

1465 posts in 832 days


#5 posted 607 days ago

WD 40 is not, IMO, a good rust preventer. As it dries it gets sticky. In some cases I use baby talc, which fills voids in the metal almost to the molecular level, and it’s slippery too. Smells good. A good carnuba wax is probably your best bet in the long run. Oh, by the way, do not mix talc and WD 40, there seems to be a chemical reaction that is adverse to the metal causing immediate surface crud that looks like rust and is hard to get off.
Supper’s ready with company.
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com

View Arminius's profile

Arminius

304 posts in 2401 days


#6 posted 607 days ago

WD40 is also a pain in the butt for a lot of different finishes, and can leave visible stains on lighter woods. I use jojoba oil and paraffin wax, both of which also help the bottom slide more easily.

View groy87's profile

groy87

126 posts in 1437 days


#7 posted 607 days ago

Good to know about the wd40. I’ll be sure to remove it once I get a good substitute. :)

View Don W's profile

Don W

14622 posts in 1165 days


#8 posted 607 days ago

I wouldn’t us wd40. I use a oil called fluid film if you can find it. Just regular oil (30wt or 10w-40) would be better than wd40. 3 in 1 works well to.

Don’t worry about getting the Pitts out.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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