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Please help with rewiring new Tablesaw

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Forum topic by MGW posted 11-24-2012 07:42 PM 1287 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MGW

38 posts in 1219 days


11-24-2012 07:42 PM

Topic tags/keywords: resource tip question tablesaw

Hello everyone!

I have purchased a new saw, and while it is truly a beautiful machine, until I am able to rewire it for 220V (it’s currently set up for 110V), it is not very useful. I have attached an image of both the diagram on the motor and the wires that I am able to see.

Is anyone able to help me figure out how to change this? I would really appreciate it, and if my wife asks, we are just trying to be truly safe, it’s not because I can’t figure it out!!! :)

Michael
(MGW)

-- Michael, North Carolina -- Whittling away the time making fine lumber into perfect fire stove fuel.


13 replies so far

View teejk's profile

teejk

1215 posts in 1407 days


#1 posted 11-24-2012 08:02 PM

get a voltage meter. your drawing didn’t come across too well.

View Swyftfeet's profile

Swyftfeet

169 posts in 894 days


#2 posted 11-24-2012 08:15 PM

Wire tie the yellow & black leads from the motor together. You then tie the red from power to the one leg of the switch, and red from the motor to the other leg of the switch. Now wire nut the white lead from the motor to black from power supply, and attatch the ground from supply to chassis of te tablesaw somewhere. Done…

-- Brian

View crank49's profile

crank49

3481 posts in 1693 days


#3 posted 11-24-2012 08:17 PM

Based on the motor diagram shown you should have the two hot lines from the 220v-240v source connected , one to the RED #1 wire from the motor and the other to the WHITE #4 wire from the motor. These two wires, #1 & #4 should have nothing else attached to them.

Then the BLACK #2 and YELLOW #3 wires from the motor are tied together and wire nutted and/or taped.

If your diagram is correct, then that is all you do to the motor.

I have no idea how the switch is wired on your saw and if there is more to be done. There probably is.

I am confused by your diagram of “wires you can see”.
It looks like you are seeing 3 wire nut clusters when there should only be 2.
I suspect there may be some capacitor wires in there that were not shown in any of the diagrams.
Is there no instructions in the user manual?
Perhaps it’s time to call the manufacturer of vendor for some guidance.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View Gary's profile

Gary

7526 posts in 2155 days


#4 posted 11-24-2012 08:22 PM

Michael, if you’ll call the manufacturer, they will walk you thru it

-- Gary, DeKalb Texas only 4 miles from the mill

View MGW's profile

MGW

38 posts in 1219 days


#5 posted 11-24-2012 08:22 PM

Thanks for the help. The three wire nut groups is really what is confusing. “What I can see” means the actual wires coming from the breaker (overheat reset switch plate).
The wires lead from 2 terminals on that either to the motor or to the cord (that goes to the on/off switch and becomes the plug cord).

Brian, I don’t have a red wire coming from the power, only 1 black and 1 white in addition to the green grounded to the housing.

Thanks!!!

MGW

-- Michael, North Carolina -- Whittling away the time making fine lumber into perfect fire stove fuel.

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

1522 posts in 1237 days


#6 posted 11-24-2012 08:23 PM

While your 220 feed is two blacks and a white, it is nothing more than two hots and a common, whereby 120 is one hot and a common. The white is always common, so in your diagram, the two hots would be the two leads going out, the red and white. You should have one other place to tie the white. I cannot make sense of your current wiring, so I would look up the wiring diagram online, of consult an electrician or motor shop.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

View MGW's profile

MGW

38 posts in 1219 days


#7 posted 11-24-2012 08:56 PM

Brian (Swyftfeet), I don’t have a red wire coming from the power, only 1 black and 1 white in addition to the green grounded to the housing.

Should I use the black wire as you said and the white in place of the red in your answer? These are both hot wires from the switch.

Thanks!

-- Michael, North Carolina -- Whittling away the time making fine lumber into perfect fire stove fuel.

View teejk's profile

teejk

1215 posts in 1407 days


#8 posted 11-24-2012 09:04 PM

I say first figure out what is coming to your outlet from the breaker…2 pole breaker would suggest 240v. maybe it got split into 2 legs (dunno if that’s permitted anymore but used to be common). a voltage meter will be your best friend if you want a serious shop that you didn’t build.

I think you can hook a 240v wired motor to 120V service without much damage. the opposite is not true as far as I know…but we have a few “sparky’s posting here and they’ll opine.

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MGW

38 posts in 1219 days


#9 posted 11-25-2012 02:11 AM

Thank you! I hope to get this figured out in time to make some scraps before Monday!

-- Michael, North Carolina -- Whittling away the time making fine lumber into perfect fire stove fuel.

View Swyftfeet's profile

Swyftfeet

169 posts in 894 days


#10 posted 11-25-2012 02:43 AM

You should have 2 hots and a ground. If the wire used only has black white and ground, just ensure that the black and white are on separate hot poles at the breaker, not hot and nuetral, and you should be fine as far as the power goes, 220v circuits do not require a nuetral connection.

Use an AC capable voltmeter to ensure that it’s wired correctly.

-- Brian

View MonteCristo's profile

MonteCristo

2098 posts in 911 days


#11 posted 11-26-2012 05:02 AM

Not sure why it’s not useful on 110V. Even if you can switch it to 220V, all that will do is cut the amp draw in half.

-- Dwight - "Free legal advice available - contact Dewey, Cheetam & Howe""

View hhhopks's profile

hhhopks

564 posts in 1100 days


#12 posted 11-26-2012 12:05 PM

I like how you start your question with a diagram.
All LJ wiring questions should be that way.
It is a good reference point to start the dialog.

Don’t forget to change out your “circuit breaker” at the saw. It really is just an on/off swith with a built in overload to a two pole (currently it is single pole wired for 120 switching the “hot” leg) unit.

Let me know, if you need a new sketch of the diagram.

-- I'll be a woodworker when I grow up. HHHOPKS

View MGW's profile

MGW

38 posts in 1219 days


#13 posted 11-26-2012 05:33 PM

Thanks everybody! She’s humming now!

-- Michael, North Carolina -- Whittling away the time making fine lumber into perfect fire stove fuel.

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