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Forum topic by Dave Witkus posted 11-22-2012 08:09 PM 1055 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Dave Witkus

28 posts in 864 days


11-22-2012 08:09 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tip question joining clamping veneering

Imagine cutting a sheet of plywood into 8 equal size pieces, 2’x 4’.......then stacked like pancakes. I want to glue them up to make a solid block of wood, 2’x4’ and about 6’‘

I prefer not to buy a vacuum pump w bag in case I never need to do it again.

One idea is sand bags as they have good weight and due to it being sand, might disperse weight evenly.

I guess C clamps around the edges and huge C clamps to get the interior but of course I have no C clamps.

All responses will be appreciated.

aloha

Dave

PS…the final purpose is to create a large block and then carve a huge salad or fruit bowl. I’ve seem plywood bowls and artwork, just dont know how they join the plywood.

-- After you wipe away all the hype, who you really are is synonymous w how you treat people.


19 replies so far

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2963 posts in 1006 days


#1 posted 11-22-2012 08:16 PM

Be sure to use furniture grade plywood, less voids, but still has a few. Hopefully they won’t be on your bowl.
You could make a sturdy frame around the 2’ width. Make them 8”x 24” and use wedges to push the work together, but you have to make about three of the frames.

Harbor Freight has some pretty decent clamps for less than 5$ each that you should probably look into.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

5191 posts in 1296 days


#2 posted 11-22-2012 08:21 PM

http://www.bowclamp.com/

Or, you can make your own cauls as well.

I like using the bowclamps they are very effective.

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1834 days


#3 posted 11-22-2012 08:43 PM

I gess you wont use the corners on the plywood :-)
use two nails in the corners diagonal to each other
to prevent the plywood to slide around under the glue up
you can use sand bags , books , concreteblocks and if you
like to throw iron then take the dishes from the benchpress
everything can be used :-)

Dennis

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FirehouseWoodworking

632 posts in 1992 days


#4 posted 11-22-2012 10:06 PM

I like Dennis’ idea, only I’d modify it slightly.

Just get four 1/4” bolts, 8” long with washers nuts. Use a fender washer under the head and another under the nut. Drill a 1/4” hole in each corner, about 2” from the end and 2” from the edge. That of course assumes you will round off the corners of the bowl. Adjust the measurements accordingly.

Spread your glue, stack the plywood, insert the bolts, and tighten everything down. Then add whatever you have for weight such as sand bags, sand-filled milk jugs, cement blocks, rocks, barbell weights, or whatever. Should work. Good luck.

Cheers!

-- Dave; Lansing, Kansas

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

3709 posts in 2453 days


#5 posted 11-22-2012 10:35 PM

Dave Witkus sez” Imagine cutting a sheet of plywood into 8 equal size pieces, 2’x 4’…....then stacked like pancakes. I want to glue them up to make a solid block of wood, 2’x4’ and about 6’‘

Wow, that must be one hell of a saw, if it can cut a 4X8 sheet of plywood into eight 2’ X 4’ pieces !!!!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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Dave Witkus

28 posts in 864 days


#6 posted 11-22-2012 10:35 PM

You know what? Red neck method was tried before and worked pretty good….my dead brain cells forgot about that one.

-- After you wipe away all the hype, who you really are is synonymous w how you treat people.

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2062 posts in 1950 days


#7 posted 11-22-2012 10:41 PM

8 equal pieces = 2’ x 2’, right?

You could place a couple of 4×4 post under your project. Use cauls across the top and clamp your project between the 4×4’s and the cauls.

Like this ->here

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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patron

13142 posts in 2060 days


#8 posted 11-22-2012 10:44 PM

i’m with einstein on this one

if you cut one sheet of ply
into 2’x4’ pieces
all you get is 4 pieces

now if you were to cut two sheets …....

or as confusius might say
‘less beer
more ply’

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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Dave Witkus

28 posts in 864 days


#9 posted 11-22-2012 10:54 PM

easy guys…..8 pieces….2×2….no magic saw…...

-- After you wipe away all the hype, who you really are is synonymous w how you treat people.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

5191 posts in 1296 days


#10 posted 11-22-2012 11:01 PM

One might want to sharpen their pencils on that one.

+1 for Einstein

View teejk's profile

teejk

1215 posts in 1404 days


#11 posted 11-22-2012 11:39 PM

don’t forget the saw kerf! plywood is usually sized exactly at 4×8 so you lose about 1/8” for every cut (MDF is usually oversized). homemade cauls from 2x stock work…better if you can taper the cauls a bit on the outside edges to form a slight bow with more meat in the centers (an untuned jointer will do that for you quickly..LOL). Otherwise a few passes with belt sander on each end will work. The idea is to clamp the ends without bowing the caul upward in the center.

View a1Jim's profile (online now)

a1Jim

112494 posts in 2296 days


#12 posted 11-23-2012 06:58 AM

I think the only thing missing out of Dave’s statement is”approximately 2’x2’ ,no big deal.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View crank49's profile

crank49

3481 posts in 1690 days


#13 posted 11-23-2012 04:10 PM

Also, don’t forget that most 3/4” plywood is between 11/16” and 23/32” thick and that slight difference adds up when you add layers.

You will be a little less than a 1/2” shy of 6” with 8 layers.

My entire Roubo style workbench is made of laminated plywood; legs and all.
I had to deal with the thin plywood problem all the time during the build.

Sheets sliding around when clamping up is a real problem. Redneck solution helps because at least two wheels stay on the ground and help to stabilize things. Uneven concrete on the bottom can be another problem though.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View DS's profile

DS

2132 posts in 1139 days


#14 posted 11-23-2012 05:45 PM

If I had this project, I would glue up in several stages with more manageable pieces.
For example, the first glue up would be four glue ups with two pieces each.

Then, once those are dry, two glue ups with two of those doubled up pieces each.

And finally, the last two pieces to finish the glue up.

Trying to get eight slippery pieces to stay aligned while applying clamping pressure is just a bit too much of a challenge for someone of my advanced years.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View Howie's profile

Howie

2656 posts in 1642 days


#15 posted 11-23-2012 11:14 PM

Make sure you alternate the plywood grain when you glue it.
I’d go for the bolts with cauls if it was me.

-- Life is good.

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