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Finish and kid's toys

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Forum topic by dakremer posted 11-20-2012 02:06 PM 918 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dakremer

2489 posts in 1808 days


11-20-2012 02:06 PM

What finish is appropriate for making toys that could potentially end up in a child’s mouth – like toy blocks or something? Shellac?

-- Hey you dang woodchucks, quit chucking my wood!!!!


20 replies so far

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bondogaposis

2681 posts in 1068 days


#1 posted 11-20-2012 02:13 PM

I stick with milk paint, salad bowl finish, mineral oil or shellac.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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thejaz

40 posts in 1200 days


#2 posted 11-20-2012 02:16 PM

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Clint Searl

1479 posts in 1078 days


#3 posted 11-20-2012 07:04 PM

Is this a trick question? Because once cured, all contemporary finishes are food safe.

Clint

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

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dakremer

2489 posts in 1808 days


#4 posted 11-20-2012 07:15 PM

False. They may be deemed “food safe” but that means nothing in terms of human health. Most food isn’t safe – food safe means nothing
You’d let your child chew on/eat any finish?

-- Hey you dang woodchucks, quit chucking my wood!!!!

View Charlie's profile

Charlie

1064 posts in 1003 days


#5 posted 11-20-2012 07:39 PM

“food safe” is a general term and it simply means that food can come in contact with the cured finish. There are a lot of finishes that are “food safe” as described above that I still wouldn’t want to eat.

So food safe just means food can TOUCH it. NOT that you can mix it with food. :)

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Clint Searl

1479 posts in 1078 days


#6 posted 11-20-2012 07:50 PM

So, what cured finish isn’t safe to eat?

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

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dakremer

2489 posts in 1808 days


#7 posted 11-20-2012 07:59 PM

Good question

-- Hey you dang woodchucks, quit chucking my wood!!!!

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dakremer

2489 posts in 1808 days


#8 posted 11-20-2012 08:00 PM

I personally wouldn’t want to eat any of them

-- Hey you dang woodchucks, quit chucking my wood!!!!

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Tennessee

1511 posts in 1231 days


#9 posted 11-20-2012 08:02 PM

Clint makes a good point I’d not really thought of much.
Once the carriers gas off, what’s left that would be poisonous in small chewed quantities?

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

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Kreegan

1452 posts in 863 days


#10 posted 11-20-2012 08:55 PM

Walnut oil or mineral oil.

Rich;)

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Elizabeth

811 posts in 1860 days


#11 posted 11-20-2012 09:06 PM

Though if the toy is for someone other than a known child (for example, a school/daycare setting or being bought as a gift for someone) it might be best to avoid nut based oils in case of allergies.

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JesseTutt

811 posts in 827 days


#12 posted 11-21-2012 05:45 AM

I remember seeing a video online somewhere where they heated and mixed mineral oil and bees wax. When it cooled they applied it like a paste wax.

-- Jesse, Saint Louis, Missouri

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

11962 posts in 1822 days


#13 posted 11-22-2012 04:42 AM

I’d leave them raw wood!

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View ShopTinker's profile

ShopTinker

881 posts in 1485 days


#14 posted 11-24-2012 05:12 PM

I read an article, somewhere the other day, that recommend Milk Paint and Bee’s Wax for children’s toys

-- Dan - Valparaiso, Indiana, "A smart man changes his mind, a fool never does."

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Puzzleman

345 posts in 1661 days


#15 posted 11-24-2012 06:08 PM

I have been making children’s toys and puzzles for a living for over 10 years.
I use a water based lacquer from Valspar..
I have had it tested and there is no lead in it so it passes the CPSIA standard.

-- Jim Beachler, Chief Puzzler, http://www.hollowwoodworks.com

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