LumberJocks

hanging doors...any tips?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by mzimmers posted 613 days ago 769 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View mzimmers's profile

mzimmers

104 posts in 2511 days


613 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: hinges door hanging sag

I probably should have asked this before I started, but…I just put a door on a cabinet, and despite my best efforts, it hangs about 1/8” low on the unhinged side. (The door is about 24”x24”.) Can this be recovered, or is it yet another learning experience?

I was even thinking of removing the hinges, putting dowels into the holes and re-hanging the door, but I’m not sure what I’d to to correct my mistake. It sure seemed lined up…I guess it’s a bit of give in the hinges. The hinges are the H-shaped ones from Horton.

Installing these was a bit of an adventure, too. My cabinet doors have maple furring, and I broke off several of the #4 brass screws trying to screw them in. I think the problem was that the unthreaded part of the screw just couldn’t pass through my pilot hole. I’m reluctant to go with a bigger pilot, though, since that would likely weaken the threads. Fixing THAT was a hassle, and the hinges are hiding some serious ugliness.

Thanks for any input…this project is close to being fininshed (I think).

-- M. Zimmers, central CA


14 replies so far

View Gary's profile

Gary

6960 posts in 2029 days


#1 posted 613 days ago

Looks like no one wants to jump on this one. Dang hinges are always problems. I’ll give you my part and maybe someone much better than I will give you better info. Then we both will learn. First, I use a spacer at the bottom for the door to sit on. It’s there when I mark for the hinges and stays there until the job is finished. Yes, you can dowel the holes and re-drill. Also, don’t use those brass screws until you use either a gimlet or run a steel screw down thru your pilot hole. The steel screw or gimlet will put the threads in the wood so the brass screw wont break off. Are those hinges morticed? Maybe you could post a picture.

-- Gary, DeKalb Texas only 4 miles from the mill

View patron's profile

patron

12953 posts in 1937 days


#2 posted 613 days ago

sounds like those surface mount rustic hinges

like gary said put a spacer under the door
and anywhere else to hold it in place
mount the hinge to one side or the other first
then ‘twist’ the hinge
so it takes any slop out of the pin connection area
even if they are slightly squed
then when the spacers are removed
the door won’t ‘fall’ as the pins take hold

try try again

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View mzimmers's profile

mzimmers

104 posts in 2511 days


#3 posted 613 days ago

Thanks for the tips, guys. I did indeed use spacers, and clamped the door to the EXACT spot I wanted it. My mistake evidently was not taking the slop out of the hinge.

Good call on the steel screw; I’ll definitely do that the next time.

So…do I need to dowel all the holes, or can I solve this with just doing the door (or cabinet)?

Thanks.

These are the hinges I’m using:

http://www.horton-brasses.com/store/hinges/specialtyhinges/brasshhinges

-- M. Zimmers, central CA

View patron's profile

patron

12953 posts in 1937 days


#4 posted 613 days ago

you can just dip some wooden matches or toothpicks
in glue
and beat them in
(fill hole completely)
trim flush

wait
and reset the hinges

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View mzimmers's profile

mzimmers

104 posts in 2511 days


#5 posted 612 days ago

That’s an interesting idea, but I’d be afraid of not filling the hole completely, and having the screw “find” the old hole (they’re only going to be off by a hair, after all)...I think I’ll head into Home Despot this AM and get some 1/8” hardwood doweling.

Thanks again for the tip on taking the slack out; I don’t know how that didn’t occur to me. It’s so obvious now.

-- M. Zimmers, central CA

View patron's profile

patron

12953 posts in 1937 days


#6 posted 612 days ago

i found out the same way you did
hope it comes out right this time

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View mzimmers's profile

mzimmers

104 posts in 2511 days


#7 posted 612 days ago

Well…no steel #4 wood screws at Home Despot. (Couldn’t even find zinc in 3/4”; they only had 5/8”.)
And, I have no idea where to buy gimlets…even a search at Sears didn’t turn up anything.

Here’s my next idea: since the screws seem to be breaking where the shank meets the thread, and at the point where the shank should be entering the hole…maybe I should drill a second hole over the first one. It would be the diameter and depth of the shank.

I know it sounds like a hassle, but I only have to do it six times…what does anyone think?

-- M. Zimmers, central CA

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1148 posts in 1220 days


#8 posted 612 days ago

I dont know where they came from so I dont know where to get them, but I have a set of tapered drill bits. Must have been in the box from my dad and grandfathers estate. They sound like the answer to your dilemma
.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

View joeyinsouthaustin's profile

joeyinsouthaustin

1205 posts in 668 days


#9 posted 612 days ago

Drill the holes the same diameter of the shaft. The maple is hard. If it was hard enough to break the screws don’t worry about the threads not holding. (we do the same thing in mahogany doors and all hard woods with true brass and other screws) Next dip the screw in paste wax to lubricate it. this will also harden in the hole helping ease the doubts about the screw threads pulling out. As for those tapered bits…. $27 at rockler and they work great for the older style cab screw. If you fill the hole but are worried about drilling back into the whole two things. Let the glue dry…and/or clamp the hinge in place and use a centering bit (vix is a common brand) Here is another handy tip. We use a super glue and an activator. instant dry glue ;)

http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=10609&utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_term=&utm_content=pla&utm_campaign=PLA&gclid=CMfUv7GZ17MCFSOnPAodMEEAdA

-- Who is John Galt?

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

4744 posts in 1173 days


#10 posted 612 days ago

GRKs maybe? They’re available at Home Depot and work well.

HTH

View Tag84's profile

Tag84

573 posts in 1252 days


#11 posted 612 days ago

you could give the screw another direction, if the hinge needs to go a little up.. let the screw lean the opposite way you want the hinge to go to, and drive it in.

-- -Thomas -

View mzimmers's profile

mzimmers

104 posts in 2511 days


#12 posted 612 days ago

Thanks for all the suggestions, guys.

Joey: when you say to “drill the holes the same diameter of the shaft,” where on the shaft would I measure the diameter? I assume you don’t mean the shank; that would leave virtually nothing for the screw threads to grab.

waho: these are countersunk screws; not sure whether GRK makes them in that shape (and in a size 4).

Tag: given how miniscule the opening in the hinge is, I don’t think that would work. Besides, I’m not averse to drilling and doweling. If I had a little more room to work and/or the screws were bigger/longer, I’d definitely go that way.

-- M. Zimmers, central CA

View joeyinsouthaustin's profile

joeyinsouthaustin

1205 posts in 668 days


#13 posted 612 days ago

to be specific. The diameter of the solid that the threads are spun from. I gather from your question what kind of screw this is. The best result will come from a tapered drill bit, because the “shank” is the same size as the thread, or to say, the screw it’self is tapered The other option is to drill with a smaller bit for the threads, and then counter sink for the shank. These buggers are designed to pull tight in softwoods, and not easy in hard woods. I would also mention that with the hardwood and true brass screw combo, hand drive is the only way to go. there is also a coring tool we use when bad mistakes are made. unlike the toothpick method it will extract a whole broken screw and leave a larger hole to fill.

I promise I am not a rockler rep… we buy these from other suppleriers (grainger and wurth)

-- Who is John Galt?

View mzimmers's profile

mzimmers

104 posts in 2511 days


#14 posted 611 days ago

Heh…I’m such a clod. After collecting all this great advice (which I really do appreciate, by the way), I went out today to attack the hinges, and…realized that since my hinges are on the sides of the doors (not on the front), this approach wouldn’t work.

So, here’s what I did: I made some shims for the hinges, to “pull” the door in the right direction. It’ll never win a beauty contest, but it’s not bad IMO, especially since they’re on the sides.

In retrospect, I’m a little surprised this was necessary, since I went to great pains to make sure the cabinet was a really good rectangle, and the same with the doors. But, anyway…that part is thankfully behind me.

I will indeed invest in some of the tools mentioned above, but since I really wanted to get the doors on today, I took the drill twice approach (larger diameter up front for the shank). That made a big difference, though I still managed to break one more off in the process. One thing I’m coming away from this project with is a real respect for just how damn hard maple is.

Once again, thanks to everyone. I’m going to start a new thread about installing the ball catches, but I’ll probably post a pic with this to make the situation clearer.

-- M. Zimmers, central CA

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase