LumberJocks

Baseboard Radiator Covers

  • Advertise with us

« back to Designing Woodworking Projects forum

Forum topic by Patrick Riley posted 11-12-2012 04:14 AM 17027 views 1 time favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Patrick Riley's profile

Patrick Riley

6 posts in 1509 days


11-12-2012 04:14 AM

Good Evening All,
I just moved into my new house and it has hot water baseboard heaters on pretty much all the walls. The house is 62 years old and the baseboards are in rough shape which means they need some updating. I have been searching the web for some ideas of what other people may have done but there’s not much out there. I have found a picture of something that I’m going to use as a rough plan but I want to know if anyone else has had some sort of experience with this??

Pat


6 replies so far

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

3265 posts in 1699 days


#1 posted 11-17-2012 02:09 AM

The picture shown is beautiful. If you do something like this, be sure to use well dried poplar as your base wood. Anything else is likely to give you trouble due to proximity to heat. You will want to make some part of it removable for cleaning out the inevitable dust bunnies that clog circulation. And all surfaces, front, back, top, bottom, ends get the same finish treatment (or else!)
I used to build entire cabinets over baseboard heaters. The trick was to use a false back and false bottom with enough vents to provide the original circulation. The cabinet itself had to be vented at least on top to let accumulated heat escape. I usually concealed the vents in the toe space and behind shutters or other distraction.
Good luck!
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com There are three types of people...those who are good at math and those who aren't.

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

2572 posts in 1722 days


#2 posted 11-17-2012 02:21 AM

Could you use MDF for the raised panels? Would that be a less expensive option than poplar?

-- Art

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3042 days


#3 posted 11-17-2012 02:28 AM

cool design Pat, great job.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Patrick Riley's profile

Patrick Riley

6 posts in 1509 days


#4 posted 11-17-2012 02:54 AM

Thanks for the input. I think MDF is what I am going to use. I just finshed making the baseboards for the other walls that don’t have heaters on them and MDF is what I used. It worked well and was much cheaper than buying pre made baseboards from the hardware store plus I was able to get the exact look I wanted.

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

3265 posts in 1699 days


#5 posted 11-17-2012 07:17 PM

Yes, MDF will work pretty well. The product has improved greatly in recent years but my early experiences with it left much to be desired back then.
Good Luck.
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com There are three types of people...those who are good at math and those who aren't.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4456 posts in 3425 days


#6 posted 11-17-2012 08:12 PM

Using an exterior grade MDF would be even better. It is more dense, and when sealed with a good primer (I use Seal Coat) will paint very well. This stuff is almost bullet proof.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com