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Stranded Bamboo Shop Floor

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Forum topic by Doe posted 11-10-2012 04:29 PM 1028 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Doe

980 posts in 1487 days


11-10-2012 04:29 PM

Topic tags/keywords: shop floor

I want to use bamboo in my shop with a “QuietWalk” underlayment. Does anyone know how this works with the heavy shop tools? The guy in the store showed us how hard the stranded stuff is but I’d like to know how 200+ pounds of equipment will affect it. Does anyone have any ideas?

-- Mother Nature talks, I try to listen


19 replies so far

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RussellAP

2951 posts in 944 days


#1 posted 11-10-2012 05:04 PM

It’s suppose to be the hardest wood flooring available.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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shampeon

1377 posts in 841 days


#2 posted 11-10-2012 09:21 PM

I have bamboo floors in my house, and quite frankly they suck. I know it’s supposed to be hard, but it dents and scratches very easily.

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

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Bill White

3457 posts in 2618 days


#3 posted 11-10-2012 10:05 PM

My only question would be about how “soft” would the underlayment be? Would the weights transfer into the flooring?
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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Doe

980 posts in 1487 days


#4 posted 11-11-2012 09:51 AM

Thanks for the replies. Shampeon, the guy in the store said the the stranded stuff is a lot harder than the layered planks, and it’s got 7 layers of finish on it. He showed examples of both and was whacking them to show how hard the stranded is. Mind you, it’s twice the price. Bill, good point; we’re going for the best underlayment and I’ll ask about compression, just to be sure.

Thanks again,
Doe

-- Mother Nature talks, I try to listen

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Charlie

1017 posts in 943 days


#5 posted 11-11-2012 10:47 AM

A good strand woven bamboo will be somewhere around 2300 to 2600 on the janka scale. It’s basically the waste from the manufacture of vertical and horizontal flooring. That said, it’s still grass which is why the flooring scratches easily. I have bamboo cooking utensils that regularly get heated, steamed, beat on, used as cutting boards, etc, and I’ve had most of them for YEARS.

BUT… (and it’s a big butt) if you put a wood floor of any type in a workshop and expect it to stay looking pretty, you’re going to be extremely disappointed. ALSO, in terms of “soft step” or “quiet step” or whatever…. that’s usually a layer of compressible material. If you combine a heavy machine with compressible material, I think you’ll see separations and chipping at seams where equipment gets rolled over it or sits stationary.

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BentheViking

1752 posts in 1221 days


#6 posted 11-11-2012 02:55 PM

The stranded bamboo is a perfectly fine product, but I am far more concerned with the fact that you said your using QuietWalk. QuietWalk is a sound deadening and insulating padding to put under FLOATING FLOORS. If the salesman was trying to sell you this then he either is selling you a floating floor which is supposed to float over the sub floor and the weight of your heavy machines will act as anchors and prevent your floor from moving as a unit and may eventually bucklet. If it is a naildown floor then he is recommending an incorrect underlayment. QuietWalk’s naildown complement is Insulayment, but there are other types out there (Bellawood Premium, Eco Silent Sound HD). I think of all of them I’d recommend the Eco Silent Sound HD. It is the thinnest and as you nail down the floor it will compress more and really shouldn’t provide instability. If your still concerned go with a simple vapor barrier paper such as Silpaper, which is a modern version of rosin paper (disentergrates in time) and Felt/Tar paper (gives of some chemical fumes/vapors). Again all of this presumes your doing a naildown floor and are going over a plywood subfloor. If not let me know and I’ll let you know how you can handle it with a glue down floor.

-- It's made of wood. Real sturdy.--Chubbs Peterson

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Doe

980 posts in 1487 days


#7 posted 11-11-2012 02:55 PM

Charlie, I don’t expect the floor to stay pristine for long (maybe 15 minutes—- if I’m lucky). I’ve never heard of the janka scale; that was an interesting read and handy to know for other things. Now I have more to muddle over . . .

Thanks very much, Doe

-- Mother Nature talks, I try to listen

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RussellAP

2951 posts in 944 days


#8 posted 11-11-2012 03:15 PM

What do you plan to lay this over? Wood or concrete?

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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Doe

980 posts in 1487 days


#9 posted 11-11-2012 04:42 PM

Russell, it’ll be over concrete.

-- Mother Nature talks, I try to listen

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Doe

980 posts in 1487 days


#10 posted 11-11-2012 04:45 PM

Ben, yes it’s a floating floor over concrete. Thanks

-- Mother Nature talks, I try to listen

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RussellAP

2951 posts in 944 days


#11 posted 11-11-2012 04:46 PM

And why do you want to put something over that, too cold, look nicer…?

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8780 posts in 2757 days


#12 posted 11-11-2012 04:49 PM

I am 100% behind BentheViking’s comments.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2951 posts in 944 days


#13 posted 11-11-2012 04:50 PM

Any wood on concrete needs a barrier which will add some sponge to it. Heavy tools will cause problems. The concrete needs to be sealed and a product like a thin 1/4 styrofoam goes down next. If the floor isn’t level you’ll need to address that as well.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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Charlie

1017 posts in 943 days


#14 posted 11-11-2012 04:52 PM

Yeah the wood movement thing could bite you. Bamboo moves a LOT. They ship bamboo plywood sealed in plastic for a reason. If you get a load of it in and take it out of the plastic because you’re going to be using it the next morning, and you stand it in your vertical rack, and you pack it in there pretty tight because the rest of the rack is full and there’s nowhere else to put it…. you’ll need to use a come-along to get the first piece out in the morning because it all swelled over night…. in the shop…. NOT on a particularly humid night.

Can you tell this happened to someone? :)

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TeamTurpin

85 posts in 718 days


#15 posted 11-11-2012 04:53 PM

I’ve got bamboo flooring for my shop’s countertops. So far, I like it. But, countertop use doesn’t have to meet the demands of a shop’s floor. I chose it because it was about a third the price of maple.

-- http://www.teamturpin.org/house/shop.htm

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