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Interesting grain after turning, what is this?

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Forum topic by lumberjoe posted 11-05-2012 07:25 PM 933 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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lumberjoe

2842 posts in 935 days


11-05-2012 07:25 PM

I made myself a quick and crappy pen for shop use out of a pretty nondescript blank that came in a bulk pack. After turning it, it noticed it actually had a really cool pattern. The wood was sort of a yellowish orange, kind of soft, very easy to sand, and made powdery shavings at the drill press and on the lathe. I thought it was marblewood, but it’s not. I’ll see if I still have the small off cut and try to get a pic of the end grain. Any guesses?

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts


16 replies so far

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Sodabowski

2039 posts in 1520 days


#1 posted 11-05-2012 07:37 PM

Dude, that’s spalted something. From the thin lines I would tend to tell ”Xylaria Polymorpha” as for the mushroom that attacked it, which LOVES maple. I have a bunch of lined maple munched up by that very spalter, so I guess it’s one of the possibilities. Another one is beech, with a different mushroom in that case, Fomes Fomentarius. Can you do a close-up in full light so we can see in details? I kinda spy some green in there, which would mean beech + Fomes + Chlorociboria.

-- Holy scrap Barkman!

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lumberjoe

2842 posts in 935 days


#2 posted 11-05-2012 08:05 PM

Spalting is possible. It’s definitely not maple.

here is the off cut from that specific blank:

here is the end grain

Also here is another blank that appears to be the same species

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

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Ripthorn

768 posts in 1672 days


#3 posted 11-05-2012 08:08 PM

That last shot looks like it could be some sort of palm. Not sure though, as your first two pics scream spalted something. My gut reaction was spalted cherry, but the later pictures are certainly not that.

-- Brian T. - Exact science is not an exact science

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lumberjoe

2842 posts in 935 days


#4 posted 11-05-2012 08:09 PM

It works a lot like zebrawood, if that is any help. My first thought was olivewood, but after some research, it doesn’t appear to be.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

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Sodabowski

2039 posts in 1520 days


#5 posted 11-05-2012 08:12 PM

Wow that’s a tricky one. Not maple at all, nor beech. Can’t be palm. Mahogany maybe? though it’s very clear.

-- Holy scrap Barkman!

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lumberjoe

2842 posts in 935 days


#6 posted 11-05-2012 08:22 PM

Ripthorn, you may be correct:

Black palm: Black fibers embedded in a lighter tan or light brown colored body. Fibers are more densely packed toward the outside of the tree trunk, becoming more and more sparse toward the center of the tree. The center core of the tree is soft and contains none of the darker vascular bundles that give the wood its characteristic look and hardness. (This is nearly opposite of the typical outer sapwood/inner heartwood combination found in dicot hardwoods.)

The end grain certainly looks like palm

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

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Handtooler

1096 posts in 819 days


#7 posted 11-05-2012 08:31 PM

Could that possibly be Chinaberry? Coloring looks somewhat like some I use to try to whittle in the 50’s.

-- Russell Pitner Hixson, TN 37343 bassboy40@msn.com

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Sodabowski

2039 posts in 1520 days


#8 posted 11-05-2012 09:07 PM

Not palm, the hardness is at the two opposite extremes between the dense black fibers and the soft material in between them. Palm is an absolute PITA to turn, I spent three full hours turning a black palm pen once and won’t do it again. It splinters like crazy even with the sharpest carbide tools, the fibers tear out, I had to turn it using mostly 80 grit sandpaper and take the time… The endgrain sure looks like palm but you’d have had a really hard time with it, which doesn’t seem to be the case.

-- Holy scrap Barkman!

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lumberjoe

2842 posts in 935 days


#9 posted 11-05-2012 09:09 PM

It splintered a lot, and if you look at the pic of the blank, it is splintering like crazy. I am just good :)

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

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Sodabowski

2039 posts in 1520 days


#10 posted 11-05-2012 09:11 PM

Well maybe then, but anyway the endgrain view of palm can’t be confused: the fibers are always seperated. In this case you have a bunch of hard stuff with some softer stuff in between. Or you stumbled upon a very special specimen :)

-- Holy scrap Barkman!

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Sodabowski

2039 posts in 1520 days


#11 posted 11-05-2012 09:15 PM

Black palm blank that I drilled a year ago and that will wait until the end of time before I turn it!

-- Holy scrap Barkman!

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Sodabowski

2039 posts in 1520 days


#12 posted 11-05-2012 09:17 PM

Your stuff looks like wenge or mahogany, without the color.

-- Holy scrap Barkman!

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lumberjoe

2842 posts in 935 days


#13 posted 11-05-2012 09:19 PM

Yikes! The only wood I have not been able to turn so far is African blackwood. It’s never even made it off the drill press table in one piece.

I think it is some rather plain red palm:

http://www.exoticwoodgroup.com/images/penblanks/RedPalmpenblanks.jpg

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

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Sodabowski

2039 posts in 1520 days


#14 posted 11-05-2012 09:23 PM

Ah yes, that looks more like your stuff indeed. African blackwood is a pesky species, but it’s worth the effort, I made a crude preliminary version of a two-tone electric guitar fretboard out of African Blackwood and Redheart. Without a table saw nor any decent mitering jig… but boy, does that beast shine after some sanding!

-- Holy scrap Barkman!

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biggeorge50

11 posts in 878 days


#15 posted 11-06-2012 05:45 PM

A friend of mine made a duck call and a goose call out of black palm. They are sure beautiful, but he said it will take him at least a year to build up the patience to do any more.

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