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Forum topic by lumberjoe posted 11-03-2012 03:24 PM 1072 views 0 times favorited 27 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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lumberjoe

2893 posts in 1716 days


11-03-2012 03:24 PM

There seems to be a fair amount of people here who are somehow involved in the IT industry, or were at one point. One could draw a conclusion that it is a common hobby for us keyboard jockeys – BUT I don’t think that is the case. For example, not a single one of my coworkers is into woodworking at all. What are your experiences?

Is there a correlation between IT and woodworking, or does there just happen to be a sizable sample here (and other corners of the internet) because IT professionals tend to be internet superusers?

-- https://pinepointwoodworks.wordpress.com/


27 replies so far

View Matt Przybylski's profile

Matt Przybylski

528 posts in 1845 days


#1 posted 11-03-2012 04:21 PM

I’m a web developer myself and when I was younger and early in my career I would sit on the computer for hours and do tutorials and learn as much as I can to move ahead. At this point in my life I’m pretty comfortable professionally (even though you have to keep learning all the time but it comes easier now that I have a basis) and I started a family. Couple that with the fact that I now hate the computer “after hours” and am trying to get away and do something productive and owning a house and wanting to make furniture for it and that’s how I got into it. I now can’t stop and think about it constantly. I think it’s a combo of just wanting to feel like you’re doing something with your hands and “manly” :) (no disrespect to any female woodworkers here intended, just for the men).

-- Matt, Illinois, http://www.reintroducing.com

View Don W's profile

Don W

17971 posts in 2035 days


#2 posted 11-03-2012 04:30 PM

I switched careers a little over 15 years ago. I used to do carpentry / woodworking and went into IT. I’ve met a lot of IT guys with the same story.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

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David Craig

2136 posts in 2576 days


#3 posted 11-03-2012 08:26 PM

I think some of it might be an age thing, mixed with the IT. The younger generation grew up on computer games and that kind of thing. When you get into the 30+ age group, there are some of us that still remember having no digital entertainment growing up and might be a little nostalgic for things we used to do physically. In my area, it seems that the 20+ crowd of IT pros will have entertainment revolving around the virtual, and the older folks will be engaged in things like hunting, woodworking, mechanics, things of a more physical nature. Again, just an observation in the general sense.

-- There is little that is simple when it comes to making a simple box.

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TopamaxSurvivor

17677 posts in 3143 days


#4 posted 11-03-2012 10:32 PM

some of us that still remember having no digital entertainment growing up Yeah, like no TV ;-)

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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Don W

17971 posts in 2035 days


#5 posted 11-03-2012 10:37 PM

We got our first tv when I was 13. If you told me when I graduated high school I would make a living doing this stuff, I’d have laughed so hard I would have peed my pants.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

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David Craig

2136 posts in 2576 days


#6 posted 11-03-2012 10:40 PM

My Dad once told me, when I was about 12, that the average kid watched 3 hours of tv a day (obviously that number is much larger now). He told me it was one of the few times when he could say he was proud to have a kid that was well below average :)

-- There is little that is simple when it comes to making a simple box.

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TopamaxSurvivor

17677 posts in 3143 days


#7 posted 11-03-2012 10:54 PM

Hey guys, we have Cisco Kid and Hoppy reruns on Saturday afternoon here ins Seattle ;-))

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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TopamaxSurvivor

17677 posts in 3143 days


#8 posted 11-03-2012 11:02 PM

When I was 12 I spent about 3 hours a day milking and doing my chores. Not sure how many hours were watching TV. Not that many left ;-)

I thought about moving on to IT, but I can’t sit around in a cube like my kid does!

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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ChuckV

2881 posts in 2994 days


#9 posted 11-03-2012 11:18 PM

Interesting post.

I’ve been a software developer since about 1982. In my current group of 11 people, I am the only woodworker. Of the many developers that I work with, there are very few woodworkers. Many of my coworkers are amazed that someone can actually make the things that we here take for granted.

I think that the numbers here are inflated because someone who is or was in a computer field is likely to be interested in seeking such a community on the internet.

-- “Big man, pig man, ha ha, charade you are.” ― R. Waters

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HamS

1809 posts in 1856 days


#10 posted 11-03-2012 11:35 PM

I am a second generation programmer. I am about the 10th generation of builders/woodworkers etc. Not very many sixty year old second generation programmers, but dad started programming in 1955. In my officde there are six of us and two woodworkers. I think there are stronger correlations between IT and musicians than woodworkers

-- Haming it up in the 'bash.

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2524 posts in 2905 days


#11 posted 11-03-2012 11:50 PM

You’ll find a number of professions of people who where woodworkers. An good example is my friend Brett. He taught english with me at the school is worked at. He finally had had it with the seasonal of and on carpentry business and needed something more stable. He got his teaching degree and never went back.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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MarkTheFiddler

2053 posts in 1656 days


#12 posted 11-03-2012 11:57 PM

HamS – You hit the nail on the head. I know so many programmer musicians, that it’s a scary true correllation. I actually started programming because I LIKED it. What does not surprise me is the tie between the artistic types and programming.

-- Thanks for all the lessons!

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MontanaBob

570 posts in 2151 days


#13 posted 11-04-2012 12:19 AM

I had read a little about computer programing in the early 70’s…so thought why not…I went to the Billings Business Collage (It closed up years ago) and the head of the collage told me that computer programing was just a fad, and would never amount to anything…He was an old guy then, but I’ve always wondered if he lived long enough to see what happen with computers….I’ve had computers back since the 386 days….My son is in IT. I did learn a little programing on my own, just to see how they did that…Javascript was the way to go, c+, and c++ was way over my head…and I haven’t touched programing for years now….

-- To realize our true destiny, we must be guided not by a myth from our past, but by a vision of our future

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oldnovice

5733 posts in 2835 days


#14 posted 11-04-2012 12:25 AM

I started in software/hardware back when the first Intel 8080 microprocessor was introduced circa 1972; in fact my development system was an Intel MDS serial number 4 which I donated to the Intel museum in Santa Clara California.
I continued in this direction until 1985 when I went into distributed control systems hardware/software and was the author/co-author of 7 patents including the original PoE (Power over Ethernet).
In 2005 I changed direction into DNA micro-array processing, laser interferometry, and in 2009 I was laid off and decided that 40 years was enough and retired!

My woodworking started in 1960 and has been with me through all of the professional career changes mentioned above and is still with me today.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2893 posts in 1716 days


#15 posted 11-04-2012 01:14 AM

We always had a computer growing up because my parents were early adopters of everything. I never took an interest though. I had almost no interest in video games (still don’t) and rarely watched TV I started in IT by chance. I went to school for marketing. While putting myself through school, I worked at a (now closed) electronics retail chain. I started selling appliances and did quite well. I was asked to move to the computer department, because in the late 90’s, computers were selling like hotcakes. . Being one of those people who has to know everything about everything, I leaned quick. My first job after college was general help desk work for an ISP. I then moved into the Tier II group, and finally the Tier III team before the company closed it doors. I got a great severance and took the opportunity to get some Cisco certs. I then joined my current company as a junior engineer, then moved up and am now in upper management (my direct manager is an Executive). I would agree there are strong connections between IT and musicians, but I think we have a “bad sample” here to say there is a strong connection between woodworking and IT.

I don’t really think woodworking as a hobby comes with age. My peers now are all director or executive level, and I am the baby of the group at 35 years old. Predominant hobbies seem to be sailing, traveling the world and golf. There is not one woodworker in the bunch. They think the (mediocre) work I do is some kind of black magic.

I think if you were to sample internet woodworking forums, you may find a lot of IT professionals. However I think if you sample IT environments, you will likely find the opposite.

-- https://pinepointwoodworks.wordpress.com/

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