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Forum topic by Texchappy posted 11-01-2012 12:52 AM 1132 views 0 times favorited 32 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Texchappy

252 posts in 871 days


11-01-2012 12:52 AM

As I approach leaving the military, we’re designing our retirement house. This leads me to my question…

For a handtool workshop for a person with limited mobility – would you have it part of the design for the house (i.e. within the blueprint) or would you have it detached from the house?

Location will be the Texas panhandle.

-- Wood is not velveeta


32 replies so far

View Moron's profile

Moron

4666 posts in 2544 days


#1 posted 11-01-2012 12:57 AM

Limited mobility would tell me to have it attached.

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

1313 posts in 908 days


#2 posted 11-01-2012 01:00 AM

I would have it attached since that more easily permits sharing utilities such as heating, cooling and plumbing. Also, I don’t like to put on/take off a jacket or boots every time I run back and forth between the house and the shop. Since you will be mostly be using hand tools, dust and noise shouldn’t present much of an issue.

Thanks for serving our Country.

-- Art

View JesseTutt's profile

JesseTutt

804 posts in 761 days


#3 posted 11-01-2012 01:08 AM

With an attached shop you have a ease of access, ease of wiring and heating/cooling. But, you have the dust problem and the “Honey could you …” consideration.

-- Jesse, Saint Louis, Missouri

View splinterking's profile

splinterking

50 posts in 688 days


#4 posted 11-01-2012 01:11 AM

Just my opinion if you’re building from scratch I’d attach it to the house for HVAC and electric like AandCstyle said, but I’d also put a garage or other large door on the front and give it a drive way. That way you could move lumber in or take deliveries of it very easily, instead of having to haul it around the house or worry about delivery truck access to your shop. Who knows you could get a bug for a Powermatic cabinet saw one day and with a large front accessible door it would be no problem.

-- "Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society." ~Mark Twain

View Pabs's profile

Pabs

175 posts in 2105 days


#5 posted 11-01-2012 01:16 AM

I’ve had both and I LOVE my attached workshop
in my case I took over the attached garage and made it my workshop. I can run the loudest machine while the family is sleeping without any problems!
so much more fun to be able to simply go from the house to the shop without having to get dressed to go outside..I live in Canada so in winter I always had to get dressed heavily before heading into the shop

since you are in the design phase just make sure you position it in a way that is far from the bedrooms and make sure the walls between the house and the shop are well insulated in order to provide a sound barrier
but for me , hands down it’s attached!

-- Pabs

View toolie's profile

toolie

1759 posts in 1279 days


#6 posted 11-01-2012 01:21 AM

when wood magazine featured a shop article about a soldier with injuries serious enough to require a wheelchair, he attached his shop to the house for ease of mobility.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112070 posts in 2228 days


#7 posted 11-01-2012 01:28 AM

Depending on how limited your mobility is, I would build a detached shop. I have mine attached and even though my compressor is on the far side of my shop outside it’s still noisy enough to be an annoying . I have the same problem with noisy equipment when it’s running. One other problem is tracking lots of saw dust in.plus fumes coming in the house every time you open a door in the shop(assuming you won’t have a spray booth). If you decide to go with the attached shop shop you will need more than just normal insulation to cut down on the noise.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View pmayer's profile

pmayer

572 posts in 1716 days


#8 posted 11-01-2012 01:30 AM

I concur with the masses on this. I favor attached in general, and given mobility limitations I would think it would be a much better approach for you.

-- PaulMayer, http://www.vernswoodgoods.com

View Milo's profile

Milo

851 posts in 1970 days


#9 posted 11-01-2012 01:46 AM

Detached, but with easily access. Noise, dust, and wife issues are important!

-- Beer, Beer, Thank God for Beer. It's my way of keeping my mind fresh and clear...

View Gripfast's profile

Gripfast

14 posts in 1988 days


#10 posted 11-01-2012 02:07 AM

I have had both, and by far enjoy having a stand alone shop. because I ran gas, hydro & phone, I was not allowed to run plumbing. Apparently, plumbing makes it habitable and that changes the tax rate.

-- Hakuna Matata

View Pabs's profile

Pabs

175 posts in 2105 days


#11 posted 11-01-2012 02:11 AM

to be honest dust has never been an issue for me…I don’t crack the door open when I’m in the middle of working and do a decent job with dust collection/cleaning…
you mentioned hand tools,if that’s the bulk of what you will do then dust is not an issue…the one point about fumes is valid. if you work with things that are smelly then you may have an issue… personally I stay away from anything that smells…there usually is a non smelly , not toxic version of the smelly stuff!
I care more about my lungs than I do about a high gloss finish! :)

-- Pabs

View jap's profile

jap

1228 posts in 705 days


#12 posted 11-01-2012 02:14 AM

attached

-- Joel

View upinflames's profile

upinflames

87 posts in 813 days


#13 posted 11-01-2012 12:08 PM

You could always have detached, not but 20 or 30 feet, run a breezeway between house and shop, something in the line of a screened in porch per say.

View Gripfast's profile

Gripfast

14 posts in 1988 days


#14 posted 11-01-2012 12:10 PM

I have had both, and by far enjoy having a stand alone shop. because I ran gas, hydro & phone, I was not allowed to run plumbing. Apparently, plumbing makes it habitable and that changes the tax rate.

-- Hakuna Matata

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

1675 posts in 1573 days


#15 posted 11-01-2012 12:20 PM

I agree with a1Jim . I had an attached shop and now have a detached one. Sawdust is the issue so I prefer detached. Heating the shop here in west Texas is not so much an issue and a window unit works well for cooling.

-- In God We Trust

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