LumberJocks

How do I repair a dimple in my new SawStop table top?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by Grampa_Doodie posted 631 days ago 1178 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Grampa_Doodie's profile

Grampa_Doodie

148 posts in 894 days


631 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: sawstop question tablesaw

I really do hate asking questions like this, but I must. I’ve had my brand new SawStop table saw for just a few months now, and I did something this past weekend that nearly brought tears to the eyes of this old woodworker.

I accidentally tipped over my 18V driver/drill…which had an 1/8” bit secured in the chuck. The tip of the bit put an ever so tiny dimple into the nice, shiny new cast iron top of my SawStop table saw.

This dimple isn’t so much the issue, but rather the ridge that was created around the perimeter of the dimple. I’m afraid that this very sharp rim will eventually damage any wood that happens to glide over it.

So, I’m calling all woodworkers in hopes that you’ll share your expertise on how to fix this unfortunate mishap. I’m hoping I can fix this sharp rim without doing too much damage to the beautiful surface of the table top.

Any tips would be great appreciated.

Gramps.

-- If at first you don't succeed...DO NOT try skydiving.


21 replies so far

View Cellulosespinner's profile

Cellulosespinner

62 posts in 631 days


#1 posted 631 days ago

My 2 cents would be to use a fine file to remove the ridge and the wet sand mineral oil and 600 grit or finer wet/dry sandpaper.

-- Once in a man's life you should have a good dog, a good horse and a good woman. The trick is to get them all together at the same time

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2163 posts in 1447 days


#2 posted 631 days ago

I would use a handle-less file, gramps, and lay it flat on the table and stroke gently the ridge. It will go away. I’ve done this.

And be a little kinder to yourself. Tools are made to do work, and they will end up showing signs being used. “Character marks.” A table saw sitting in a store has potential to do work, but no proof and no character. You are giving this inanimate object a realized purpose and the personality to go along with it.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View doordude's profile

doordude

1085 posts in 1579 days


#3 posted 631 days ago

like a new car, with its first scratch. it’s now broke in!
just wet sand with 320,400 600 untill the burs are gone. no big deal

View doubleDD's profile (online now)

doubleDD

2317 posts in 640 days


#4 posted 631 days ago

try a very st.iff putty knife with a quick swoop, that may get rid of it.

-- --Dave, Downers Grove, Il. When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2254 posts in 1479 days


#5 posted 631 days ago

sand it with progressively finer grits.

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

View patron's profile

patron

12955 posts in 1937 days


#6 posted 631 days ago

with all the dings and dents
that happen

i just use my da erbital sander
and some mineral spirits

then wax again

good to go

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View Grampa_Doodie's profile

Grampa_Doodie

148 posts in 894 days


#7 posted 631 days ago

Thank you all for the wonderful replies. I knew I could count on this wonderful community of woodworkers to come up with great ideas.

Very much appreciated, Gramps.

-- If at first you don't succeed...DO NOT try skydiving.

View Grampa_Doodie's profile

Grampa_Doodie

148 posts in 894 days


#8 posted 631 days ago

On another note. I’m like a kid on Christmas day today. My “aircraft carrier” Grizzly 8” jointer is being delivered this afternoon. :)

Again, thanks everyone!!

Gramps.

-- If at first you don't succeed...DO NOT try skydiving.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6914 posts in 1510 days


#9 posted 631 days ago

That is nothing that a six-pak of beer couldn’t fix.

Wanna feel bad… I had the chain of my 1-ton hoist (normally pulled to the side and up on a hook) get loose and fall across my TS and put maybe three dozen little dings on the cast iron top, all close together. I had owned my new TS less than 2-months at the time.

The beer fixed the panic, and by golly you wouldn’t believe it! The TS still worked and cuts a straight line! (sarcasm)

Personally, I think you would stand a greater chance of messing up the top by trying a DIY repair than ignoring it and getting on with making dust. (serious)

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1755 days


#10 posted 631 days ago

My dad once bought a new truck and he immediately put a scratch on it, on purpose. When I asked why, he said, ” Now I don’t have to worry about scratching it.” I thought that was absurd at the time. Now, I think it’s pretty smart.

I would attempt to use a ball-peen hammer to work down the raised metal, then sand smooth with some WD-40 and small piece of fine grit sand paper, if necessary. Seriously, that last step is probably unnecessary and will make the “repair” more obvious.

But that’s just the first of many dings and scratches to come! Kinda sad.

BTW, I’d recommend anything from Stone Brewery to help you through these traumatic times.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6914 posts in 1510 days


#11 posted 631 days ago

One mistake that I DID MAKE, was using when “Rust Free” rust remover. A good product if used correctly

NEVER: Spray directly on any iron surface to be cleaned. I did and now have a small area where I have permanent “splash” marks from the spray.

ALWAYS DO: Always spray on a cloth not facing your cast iron. And THEN use the dampened cloth in a back and forth single direction across the entire surface (straight line).

BTW, this product works best on old iron surfaces that have already discolored. It works on new surfaces as well but does change the color of the surface to more of a gray.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View CessnaPilotBarry's profile

CessnaPilotBarry

877 posts in 707 days


#12 posted 631 days ago

Trust me, I understand… If you’re using stuff, stuff happens!

A few years ago, my Veritas large shoulder plane landed nose first on concrete! Careful filing, a little wet sanding with a block and WD-40, and it’s perfectly usable. Cellulose and Lee describe methods nicely.

Consider it “patina”... ;^)

-- It's all good, if it's wood...

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1755 days


#13 posted 631 days ago

Yah, I dropped my LN rabbet-block plane on the cement floor the other day. Ugh. I flattened it back out, but I wasn’t happy with myself. The thing about those planes is that they are more vulnerable to breakage by design, so I got a little lucky.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1755 days


#14 posted 631 days ago

Mike said, “NEVER: Spray directly on any iron surface to be cleaned. I did and now have a small area where I have permanent “splash” marks from the spray.”
—————————-

Yeah, this is why I said that its probably better to skip the sanding step if not completely necessary. You end up making a bigger scratchy spot rather than a small ding. It just makes matters worse. And you have to be careful what chemical you use, if any, because of discoloring the top.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View Grampa_Doodie's profile

Grampa_Doodie

148 posts in 894 days


#15 posted 631 days ago

I really enjoyed reading all of your answers, especially HorizontalMike’s “six-pack of beer” suggestion. :)

I’d really like to leave the ding alone, but the raised part of the ding has me worried. I had a similar issue on my old table saw, and every time I ran a nice sheet of oak, cherry, or birch plywood across my saw’s table top, it would leave a nasty line cut into the surface of the sheet goods.

So I’m going to put together all of your replies and try the one that I think will work best in my situation.

As always, you’re a great group of people with wonderful tips. Thanks again for all your help!!

Gramps.

-- If at first you don't succeed...DO NOT try skydiving.

showing 1 through 15 of 21 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase