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Anti-seize compound on planer bolts question

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Forum topic by TopamaxSurvivor posted 10-28-2012 09:06 PM 1295 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TopamaxSurvivor

14875 posts in 2367 days


10-28-2012 09:06 PM

Topic tags/keywords: seized bolts planer head anti-seize compound

I have seen threads about seized bolts in planer heads several times. Is there a good reason not to use an anti-seize compound on planer bolts?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence


20 replies so far

View NiteWalker's profile

NiteWalker

2710 posts in 1268 days


#1 posted 10-28-2012 09:57 PM

I’ve seen plenty of recommendations to do so, and I don’t have a planer yet, but I do have a tube of anti-seize ready to go for when I do.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

View Tedstor's profile

Tedstor

1369 posts in 1324 days


#2 posted 10-28-2012 10:00 PM

I don’t see how it could hurt. But I always thought the bolts became seized after looong periods (years) of idleness. That said, if the machine is used periodically and maintained, I wouldnt think they would sieze-up in the first place.

View ajosephg's profile

ajosephg

1854 posts in 2252 days


#3 posted 10-28-2012 10:04 PM

”I have seen threads about seized bolts in planer heads several times. Is there a good reason not to use an anti-seize compound on planer bolts?”

I’d say that makes a good case to use anti-seize.

-- Joe

View cutworm's profile

cutworm

1065 posts in 1484 days


#4 posted 10-28-2012 10:15 PM

I’ve seen threads too. I have a new planer and am thinking about replacing the bolts with a higher grade. My guess is that manufacturers go with low bid on bolts as long as they are within a very loose spec.

-- Steve - "Never Give Up"

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TopamaxSurvivor

14875 posts in 2367 days


#5 posted 10-28-2012 10:20 PM

Thanks for the input. I have one that I haven’t used. I guess the first thing I will do is anti-seize it ;-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2072 posts in 1330 days


#6 posted 10-28-2012 10:58 PM

More than you asked for, but since there are many kinds of anti-sieze compounds for differing needs, here’s a minute or two of reading for you:

Galling
A severe form of adhesive wear which occurs during sliding contact of one surface relative to another. In extreme cases, welding may occur due to friction.

Anti-Seize
A compound used on the threads of fasteners to prevent galling. Often used on stainless steel fasteners.

From the Loctite site:

Anti-seize compounds protect mated metal parts against friction, galling, and corrosion. Anti-seize also reduces wrench torque to facilitate assembly and disassembly of threaded connections. Loctite anti-seize compounds are stocked in a variety of formulations for your specific applications. Some of the more common anti-seize compounds are listed below.

C5-A Copper Base

Exclusive formula suspends copper and graphite in a high quality grease. Protects metal parts from rust, corrosion, galling and seizing at temperatures to 1800°F. Tested and certified to MIL-A-907.

Technical Data Sheet – C5-A

Nickel Anti-Seize

Copper-free. Recommended for stainless steel and other metal fittings. For preventing corrosion, seizing and galling in harsh chemical environments and temperatures to 2400°F.

Technical Data Sheet -Nickel Anti-Seize

Heavy Duty Anti-Seize

Metal-free. Excellent lubricity. Provides outstanding lubrication to all metals including stainless steel, aluminum, and soft metals up to 2400°F. Meets requirements of USDA for incidental food contact.

Technical Data Sheet – Heavy Duty Anti-Seize

Moly Paste

Very low friction. Lubricates press fits, protects during break-in and under high static loads up to 750°F. Allows maximum clamping from available torque. Meets requirements of USDA for incidental food contact.

Technical Data Sheet -Moly Paste

Moly Dry Film

Solid film lubricant for sliding surfaces and slow-moving parts. Temperature resistant up to 750°F as a dry film lubricant, 2400°F as an anti-seize. Won’t squeeze out, burn off or pick up dirt.

Technical Data Sheet – Moly Dry film

Food Grade Anti-Seize

Meets USDA code H2 standards for incidental food contact. Prevents seizure, galling and friction in stainless steel and other metal parts up to 900°F.

Technical Data Sheet – Food Grade Anti-Seize

Graphite-50 Anti-Seize

Electrically conductive, non-metallic. (was MIL-T-5544). Temperature resistant to 900°F. Highly electrically conductive in metal-to-metal joints..

Technical Data Sheet – Graphite 50

Moly-50 Anti-Seize

General-purpose thread lubricant tested to MIL-T-83483. Temperature resistant to 750°. Provides excellent lubricity.

Technical Data Sheet – Moly 50

Zinc Anti-Seize

Protects aluminum and ferrous surfaces from seizure and corrosion to 700°F. Tested to MIL-T-22361.

Technical Data Sheet – Zinc Anti-Seize

Silver Grade Anti-Seize

Graphite and metallic flake petroleum-based lubricant compound. Will not evaporate or harden in extreme cold or heat- assemblies up to 1600°F.

Technical Data Sheet – Silver Grade

N-1000 High Purity Copper Anti-Seize

Certified pure. Copper based anti-seize suitable for critical, long-term stainless steel applications and high nickel alloy bolting. Recommended for protecting Class 2 and 3 power plant hardware. Temperature resistant to 1800°F.

Technical Data Sheet – N-1000

N-5000 Nickel High Purity Anti-Seize

Nickel-based. Lubricates and protects Class 1,2 and 3 power plant hardware. Recommended for highly corrosive environments to 2400°F.

Technical Data Sheet – N-5000

C-200 Sold Film Lubricant

Bake on solid film protection for engine parts, bearings and servo-mechanisms. Temperature resistant up to 750°F as a dry film lubricant, 2400°F as an anti-seize. Tested and certified to PWA-586.

Technical Data Sheet – C-200

Extreme Pressure Grease

Lubricates gears, bearings and slides up to 450°. NLGI #1 Rated. Withstands extremes of pressure, resists water washout. Maintains pumpability at low temperatures; will not take a hard set after cooling. Meets requirements of USDA for incidental food contact.

Technical Data Sheet – EP Grease

Food Grade Grease

Extreme pressure grease with temperature resistance tom 450°F NLGI #2 Rated. Protects after flushouts and steam cleaning. Meets requirements of USDA for incidental food contact.

Technical Data Sheet – Food Grade Grease

Silicone Lubricant

Multi-purpose aerosol stops sticking, friction, squeaking and binding of moving parts. Non-gumming. Will not mar paint, rubber or plastic surfaces. Waterproofs and electrically insulates. Meets requirements of USDA for incidental food contact. Contains no ODCs.

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14875 posts in 2367 days


#7 posted 10-29-2012 01:42 AM

which is best?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View NiteWalker's profile

NiteWalker

2710 posts in 1268 days


#8 posted 10-29-2012 01:51 AM

This was the one I seen mentioned the most, so it’s the one I grabbed.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

2913 posts in 1776 days


#9 posted 10-29-2012 02:00 PM

Cutworm, if your planer came with grade 5 bolts then the planer is strong enough to take the torque for grade
5 and you put grade 8 bolts in the torque required to properly tension the grade 8 bolts may be more than
the planer was built to take, so using the stronger bolts may cause the bolt holes to strip out. For a bolt to
hold properly, enough tension has to be applied to slightly stretch the bolt and give it the correct clamping
force. Too little torque will allow the bolt to loosen, to much will strip the threads. This is why many machines
come with torque specs and recommend the use of a torque wrench. This is one reason why I keep a torque
chart for the different grades of bolts, both metric, US standard and SAE and a torque wrench handy in my
shop.

-- As ever, Gus-the 75 yr young apprentice carpenter

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

5092 posts in 1268 days


#10 posted 10-29-2012 02:26 PM

http://www.portlandbolt.com/technicalinformation/bolt-torque-chart.html

Torque bolt chart for different applications.

Thanks for the info on the anti-seize compounds. Interesting.

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3190 posts in 1366 days


#11 posted 10-29-2012 02:38 PM

+1 for the torque lesson that Bluepine stated. Installing grade 8 fasteners is not the answer to the world’s problems like many think. Install the fasteners that the tool was designed around and tighten them like they told you in the owner’s manual or on a torque spec. My pet peeve (well, one of them anyway) is a tire shop that runs the lug nuts up with an impact wrench then puts a 4 ft long torque wrench on the nut. They jerk on the handle and if the wrench clicks they say it is torqued! Not so!
Most of the people on this site have the better woodworking tools but when it comes to wrenches to loosen the nuts and bolts they have the cheaper lines of tools. Open end wrenches will spread when a large amount of pressure is applied so I am an advocate of buying some better wrenches for this type of job. Only a couple of wrenches would be necessary in many cases. Snap-On or MAC are a couple of the brands that professional mechanics use. I am sure there are other brands but not all of them are in this class. I had a sitiuation where a starter motor bolt was rounding off. My friend said let’s try my Snap-On wrench. I was totally amazed and shouldn’t have been. The good wrench turned the bolt with no more stripping. This needs to be considered when we are dealing with a situation like jointer knives or planer knives.
Have a good day!!

View IrreverentJack's profile

IrreverentJack

724 posts in 1534 days


#12 posted 10-29-2012 07:48 PM

Permatex would be the easiest brand to find in my area. I would avoid anything with silicone in it. -Jack

View Knothead62's profile

Knothead62

2364 posts in 1652 days


#13 posted 10-29-2012 07:52 PM

Anti-seize wouldn’t hurt. I use the grey icky stuff on shotgun choke tubes and anything else I don’t want to stick. Dad said he used it on spark plugs on C-47’s in the South Pacific.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14875 posts in 2367 days


#14 posted 10-30-2012 12:53 AM

Looking at the torque bolt chart, I suppose anti-seize compound would count as lubricated, eh?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3190 posts in 1366 days


#15 posted 10-30-2012 02:28 AM

I would say lubricated

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