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Forum topic by steve6678 posted 10-28-2012 12:51 AM 2004 views 1 time favorited 25 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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steve6678

438 posts in 812 days


10-28-2012 12:51 AM

Narex…yes or no?

-- Steve - Dust sucks!


25 replies so far

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a1Jim

112934 posts in 2329 days


#1 posted 10-28-2012 01:17 AM

I prefer Irwin but I’ve heard others like Narex.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Tedstor

1506 posts in 1385 days


#2 posted 10-28-2012 01:25 AM

Narex makes perhaps the best chisel under $20.

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bhog

2177 posts in 1442 days


#3 posted 10-28-2012 01:27 AM

I have a set of em and am happy.

-- I don't drive a Prius.

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crank49

3524 posts in 1723 days


#4 posted 10-28-2012 01:31 AM

I love my Narex mortise chisels. If the regular bench chisels are as good, and no reason to think they are not, they should be fine. I have a few old Stanley #60s, some Fullers and a set of Wood Rivers and some made in the USA Buck Brothers and one Irwin/Marples. With that as my reference point, I think the Narex chisels are the best I own.

Now, if I had some Ray Iles, Lee Neilson, Veritas , Two Cherries or similar, I might have a different opinion. But, for the money I think the Narex are just fine. I even think the oval beech handles are nice, but I know some folks think they are ugly.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

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steve6678

438 posts in 812 days


#5 posted 10-28-2012 01:31 AM

I have an old set of Marples, and they are spent.
I didn’t know how to deal with sharpening a chisel and ruined them…I think.
Any advise on preparing new chisels from the box would be appreciated,
What do I need, to make new chisels ready…i.e stones, etc.?

-- Steve - Dust sucks!

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steve6678

438 posts in 812 days


#6 posted 10-28-2012 01:34 AM

I am Chisel dumb.
help.

-- Steve - Dust sucks!

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crank49

3524 posts in 1723 days


#7 posted 10-28-2012 01:44 AM

Read up on ” scary sharp”. You can Google it and there will be about a gazillion references along with videos on You Tube.

If I were starting fresh I would get a set of Narex Chisels from Lee Valley tools along with their sharpening jig and then study some of the reference material out there.

DO NOT take to a grinder with a new chisel. Unless you are extremely careful and have a proper brown or white wheel on you grinder you will overheat the chisel and ruin its temper. Besides, the only reason to ever touch a grinder with a chisel would be if you dropped it and chipped the edge or something similar.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

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a1Jim

112934 posts in 2329 days


#8 posted 10-28-2012 01:50 AM

There are a number of ways to sharpen chisels,a simple low cost method is the scary sharp approach. here’s a video about it.
http://www.woodsmith.com/magazine/extras/165/sandpaper-sharpening/

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Arminius

304 posts in 2555 days


#9 posted 10-28-2012 02:02 AM

The Narex are a phenomenal value. There are better chisels out there, but for a small investment you can get a full range of very good quality chisels.

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steve6678

438 posts in 812 days


#10 posted 10-28-2012 02:08 AM

Thank’s, thanks, and thanx

-- Steve - Dust sucks!

View John 's profile

John

208 posts in 2154 days


#11 posted 10-28-2012 02:17 AM

Steve- Don’t give up completely on those Marples. I have 3 sets (One set I purchased years ago & 2 sets I found at garage sales from someone like you that GAVE up on them.) They are a little on the soft side but sharpen nicely.

-- John

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Purrmaster

836 posts in 845 days


#12 posted 10-28-2012 04:40 AM

To prep new chisels the first thing you have to do is flatten the back. Find a very flat surface (a lot of people use glass) and find a way to slap some sandpaper on it. Basically just sand the back up to increasingly fine grits until you get the back shiny and mark free (more or less).

Then you need to sharpen the bevel. I’d get one of the Eclipse style honing guides and some sandpaper. The Eclipse style guides are cheap and everywhere. When hone a new bevel I start with 400 or 600 grit. Then sand up to 2,000 grit. I prefer 3M’s wet or dry sandpaper for the higher grits.

You only need to flatten the back once and subsequent sharpenings of the bevel can start from 1,000 grit and honing the bevel will only take a couple of minutes.

Many people use water stones, oil stones, sand diamond stones for sharpening.

There are also power sharpening systems such as the Work Sharp and Tormek.

I think the most cost effective way to get started is to buy one of the kits from Rockler. They call it their “glass plate sharpening system.” Get the fine grit one. It has the glass, the honing guide, and some stick on sandpaper.

View Kreegan's profile

Kreegan

1452 posts in 898 days


#13 posted 10-28-2012 02:26 PM

I have 3 different sets of what you’d consider affordable chisels, and I like all 3. I have 3 of the Irwin blue chip chisels (1/2”, 3/4” and 1”). I have gotten a lot of use out of those Irwins, mostly mortise and tenon chopping, but also a lot of paring.

I also have a 4 piece set of WoodRiver butt chisels from Woodcraft (1/4”, 1/2”, 3/4”, 1”). I really like these chisels because they’re easy to control. The main thing I’ve used them for is removing the waste from dovetails. They’re short and stubby and very easy to make fine, accurate cuts with.

I recently purchased a set of Narex bench chisels, as well as 2 Narex mortise chisels. I got these from Highland Woodworking and they’re metric chisels, which isn’t a big deal. These chisels are very nice quality and really required very little in the way of tune up out of the box. I’ve mostly used the 6mm chisel and the 6mm and 3mm mortise chisels so far, but they work very nicely. Smooth, clean cuts.

I started with the Scary Sharp method, and it does work quite well, but I found messing with sandpaper and adhesive really annoying after awhile. If you do decide to go that route, I highly recommend some PSA adhesive-backed sandpaper like 3M Stik-it or the Porter Cable stuff.

I recently switched to using diamond stones and a strop, using the method taught by Paul Sellers. It’s been working really well for me. You can check out his chisel sharpening video here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a6ykVzL2VAM&list=UUc3EpWncNq5QL0QhwUNQb7w&index=17&feature=plcp

I also learned a lot about chisel prep and sharpening watching Deneb Puchalski from Lie-Nielsen on YouTube. Here’s one of his chisel videos:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9aDPZzMvVTA&list=PL5BE69422F61CEE64&index=9&feature=plpp_video

Rich;)

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BubbaIBA

285 posts in 1128 days


#14 posted 10-28-2012 11:47 PM

I have an old set of Marples, and they are spent.
I didn’t know how to deal with sharpening a chisel and ruined them…I think.
Any advise on preparing new chisels from the box would be appreciated,
What do I need, to make new chisels ready…i.e stones, etc.?

—Steve, MA – Dust sucks!

Steve,

I doubt you have ruined your chisels. Most mistakes can be corrected, might need to waste a little iron but most mistakes are repairable.

You can do almost every thing needed; pare, chop mortices, clean up dovetails and tenon shoulders, you name it, with three chisels, 1/4”, 3/8”, and 1/2” bevel edge chisels the rest are mostly for bragging rights and wall decoration. Buy those three chisels and buy the best you can afford. The cost for three Ashely Iles chisels is a little over $75 USD. The Ashely Iles are as good as any and better than most.

Sandpaper is cheap for start up but expensive in the long run and I think there are issues using it but, it is a cheap and fast way to learn to sharpen. I like Diamond and Arkansas stones but now we are getting into religion and you know where that leads.

Go to http://antiquetools.com/sharp/ for a good overview on hand sharpening technique.

Good luck,

ken

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fussy

980 posts in 1803 days


#15 posted 10-29-2012 07:12 AM

Narex chisels are just fine. I have six, including the two skews, my favorites. They came sharp and the biggest
thing was getting the laquer or whatever they coat the blades to get them across the pond. Best buy out there.

Steve

-- Steve in KY. 44 years so far with my lovely bride. Think I'll keep her.

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