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Forum topic by mIps posted 663 days ago 1104 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mIps

174 posts in 680 days


663 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: jig question router

I was able to pick up a new-to-me router 2nd hand for $25.00. It’s a Craftsman 1.75 HP fixed base (model 315.175110). Yes, I know craftsman isn’t the best but it was what I could afford and I figured a average router is better than no router at all. Things I like: LONG cord. Probably 10-12 feet. Variable speed. I think this will be a good feature later on. What would be above-table spindle lock. I don’t think I will use this in a table, but it’s still a nice feature

Challenges:
The height adjustment is very stiff and difficult to move. Does anyone know of a way to make this better?
It has only a 1/4” collet.

Things I already know I want:
Straight edge guide. This will be great for routing grooves and such. Reasonably sure I can build one.
Circle guide. I have ideas for some other things that will require circles. Reasonably sure I can build one.
Adjustable Dado guide. Without a Dado blade for my table saw, this is a virtual necessity. Reasonably sure I can build one.


Any input on other jigs or add-ons that I might want to tackle?

-- Be honest, honorable, kind, work hard, and generally be awesome.


12 replies so far

View Bob Kollman's profile

Bob Kollman

1796 posts in 1817 days


#1 posted 663 days ago

I copy and pasted the model # of your router into my browser. Apparently you got a junk router. On the first page of search I found 4 questions pertaining to the height adjustment ring assembly being frozen to router body. You can buy repair parts but they probably will cost as much as your initial investment, with no guarantee of a fix. Unfortunately you may have been stuck with a junk router. I own a lot of good craftsman tools,but I also know they can make a fair share of junk also. Good luck, maybe you’ll find a fix.

-- Bob Kenosha Wi.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3320 posts in 1439 days


#2 posted 663 days ago

Empire dry lube is a great way to lubricate the moving parts on your router. Just blow off the dust and give it a couple squirts. It is oil-free (won’t attract sawdust), and silicone free (won’t affect your finishes).

How about a simple circle guide Those are fun to use with routers.

As far as dado jigs, I just use Emerson straight edge clamp guides. Coupled with undersized plywood bits and some standard bits, you can make just about any size dado. I do prefer the tablesaw for cutting most dados, because the dust collection is better.

Good luck

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112010 posts in 2203 days


#3 posted 663 days ago

You’ve got a router that’s beginning, you can trade up later . The problem your having I’m afraid is kind of a business as usual for many older craftsman routers. Like “pintodeluxe” said a dry lube any brand that is basically graphite will work. I think I would spend a good amount of time cleaning both parts of the router with some naphtha or lacquer thinner. A alternative is to try some paste wax on both parts,just make sure it does not have any silicone in it. If you haven’t used a router very much a typical mistake is to shove the router bit al the way down in the collet ,this can get the router stuck in the collet particularly in older routers you may have to pound the router bit out of the collet. To avoid that problem push the router bit all the down and then pull it back up a 1/8-3/16s before you tighten it down. As far as investing in accessories goes I would stick to shop made jigs and fixtures until you can afford a router that can accept 1/2” router bits. Once you can do that then there are a good number of things you will want to invest in like these http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shopsite_sc/store/html/smarthtml/pages/routacc2.html#brass_template_anchor
Good luck with your router.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3075 posts in 1301 days


#4 posted 663 days ago

Craftsman had a good router for many years that was older than this. I still use one of those. This router you have is probably 10 to 15 years old or possibly newer. It was a change from the old solid router to a cheaper moder that used a lot of plastic. The problem with most routers that don’t want to adjust in depth of cut is saw dust between the motor and the inside of the base. IF you can get that out of this area then it will probably work more easily. Good luck.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

4824 posts in 1203 days


#5 posted 663 days ago

Congrats on your new to you router. You’ll figure it out and make some
projects with it and a belated welcome to LumberJocks!
http://lumberjocks.com/topics/31631 more ideas for ya.
HTH

View mIps's profile

mIps

174 posts in 680 days


#6 posted 663 days ago

- Bob: Yeah, I found the same things, that’s why I was hoping someone had found a fix. Were you able to find anyone who had determined if the problem was with the ring or the thread? Luckily mine is not immovable, just very stiff.
- Pintodeluxe & a1Jim: Sounds like I should avoid any kind of “wet” lubricant like grease, oil or other petroleum-based stuff and look into dry, graphite-based. I have some Johnson paste wax so I may try that. Pretty much dry lube is dry lube, yes? I definitely want to get a set of bushings at some point but will need a different base-plate to do the brass PC style. Maybe I could make a compatible base-plate…

-- Be honest, honorable, kind, work hard, and generally be awesome.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112010 posts in 2203 days


#7 posted 663 days ago

Mips
I would try clean the two pieces first ,try it out ,if that works then just clean it frequently,if not give the wax a try just make sure there’s not any silicone in it some paste waxes does have it. Sure a shop made base will work for guides. As far as dry lube just make sure it’s not a mix of graphite and some other lube. They sell small tubes of graphite as speedometer lube and for router bearings .

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View mIps's profile

mIps

174 posts in 680 days


#8 posted 663 days ago

I worked the based off of the router body and cleaned it thoroughly. (round 1: Soap, water and a old toothbrush to get off all the sawdust; Round 2: Citrus based cleaner to get rid of and sap, grease, oil or other crud and Round 3: paper towels to soak up any leftover water or other liquid). I was able to find some graphite-based lube at a local hobby store and put a little in the grooves on the motor sleeve and some on the ramp on the base ring and put the whole thing back together. It seems a little better, so here’s hoping.

Thanks for the input!

-- Be honest, honorable, kind, work hard, and generally be awesome.

View NiteWalker's profile

NiteWalker

2709 posts in 1203 days


#9 posted 663 days ago

IMHO, that $25 would have been better saved and spent on a used newer router.
Even if you get it working, you’ll be stuck with a marginal tool at best, a dangerous one at worst.

My first router was a $60 ryobi and it served me well for 3 years. It too was only a 1/4” shank, but I managed that obstacle by only using smaller bits (less than 1” diameter) in it. I did a minimal amount of research and figured it was good for my needs; and it was.

My point is, even with insignificant purchases like sandpaper, even a tiny bit of research beforehand would save you some trouble and frustration in the long run, even if you have to spend a bit more to get what you need.

I hope it works out for you, but I agree with the fact that you may have ended up with a $25 junk router. Since you already have it, keep it, tune it the best you can, and get your $25 out of it.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

View Bob Kollman's profile

Bob Kollman

1796 posts in 1817 days


#10 posted 662 days ago

No I did not see any fixes for the router. But the complaints spelled it out for me. I have never encountered a router where the ring assembly froze to the body. That tells me the threads were cut wrong from the start. I am a machinist for 25 years and a thread that size your not going to fix because there is to much surface area for friction to build. It will always be a constant fight to adjust the height of your bit, you will get little pleasure out of using this tool. The saving grace is that the router will still be good using it as a dedicated machine working with flush trim bits for patterns or to use as a edge trimmer on large boards. Good luck, and x-mas is around the corner…ask Santa for a new router!!!!

-- Bob Kenosha Wi.

View mIps's profile

mIps

174 posts in 680 days


#11 posted 662 days ago

Bob: Sadly, Santa will likely not be visiting this year as my wife and I are both under-employed and barely scraping by as-is. As much as I wish I could have found a better router, this was the best I could find for what I could scrape together. I’ll do the best I can and, hopefully, not hate the thing.

Thanks again for all the input and advice.

-- Be honest, honorable, kind, work hard, and generally be awesome.

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2829 posts in 874 days


#12 posted 661 days ago

I have the 2hp version of this router. I got it brand new as a birthday gift A LONG time ago, before I was even into woodworking. It actually sat in a box for about 6 years before I finally found a use for it. Although I have several routers now I still use it all the time and love it. I keep my 1/8” roundover bit in it for knocking down sharp corners. You did exactly what I was going to suggest. This will happen from time to time, especially if you use it in a table. Just take the base all the way off and clean it good. I usually rub on/off some johnsons paste wax on the threads and it works like magic. Just make a habit out of screwing the base off and cleaning it regularly and you won’t have problems.

A lot of people here really hate on Craftsman, but this router is not terrible. You could do A LOT worse for 25$. hell, you could do a lot worse for 75$. Take care of it and it will serve you well.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

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