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Hurricane Sandy - What are you doing to prep?

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Forum topic by chrisstef posted 10-26-2012 01:20 PM 944 views 0 times favorited 38 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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chrisstef

10858 posts in 1664 days


10-26-2012 01:20 PM

Maybe some good ideas will come from this post. Hurricane Sandy seems to be eyeballing the east coast of the US. Being pegged as “Frankenstorm” here in New England ive been getting all my ducks in a row preparring for what might be another week without power. Ill be gathering fuel, testing the generator, stocking up on water to flush toilets, cleaning the gutters, and making sure ive got lights in the shop ;)

Whats everyone else doing in preparation of the pending storm?

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty


38 replies so far

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lumberjoe

2833 posts in 906 days


#1 posted 10-26-2012 01:28 PM

I am going to be so pissed if this ruins my son’s birthday. His Birthday is Oct 30th. Last year we got that freak snowstorm on the 29th, and we were literally stuck in a house with no heat/power for half the day because of the amount of massive trees that came down on our street. We had an awesome party planned that we were forced to cancel.

I got a generator last winter so I’ll be running that and making sure it can power the important stuff; you know – the shop lighting, table saw, drill press, lathe ,etc :)

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

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chrisstef

10858 posts in 1664 days


#2 posted 10-26-2012 01:31 PM

Atta boy Joe. We went 8 days last October without power … zero on the fun meter. I hope it doesnt bungle up the little guys bday.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

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lumberjoe

2833 posts in 906 days


#3 posted 10-26-2012 01:37 PM

We went 16 here. It sucked. I generally work from home. No power means I have a 170 mile round trip commute to the office. There was one good thing that came out of it. I had 6 trees on my property that came down and needed to be chopped up. Cheap chainsaws where in short supply everywhere, so I bought the only saw our local power equipment dealer had in stock, a Stihl MS 290 farm boss. This thing is awesome!

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

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chrisstef

10858 posts in 1664 days


#4 posted 10-26-2012 01:40 PM

That 290 is a nice saw, ive got the 260 i believe and the old mans john deere on back up. 2 spare chains and plenty of 2 stroke oil at the ready.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

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lumberjoe

2833 posts in 906 days


#5 posted 10-26-2012 01:42 PM

Speaking of which, I should break out the files and sharpen up the chains while I am testing the generator.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

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Mosquito

4698 posts in 950 days


#6 posted 10-26-2012 02:10 PM

Absolutely nothing. If it makes it to MN with enough oomph to cause issues… well, it wouldn’t.

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN -- Stanley #45 Evangelist - www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods

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chrisstef

10858 posts in 1664 days


#7 posted 10-26-2012 02:15 PM

Good to hear Mos .. well store it all up here on the east coast for ya. You can keep all the snow.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

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Tedstor

1369 posts in 1291 days


#8 posted 10-26-2012 02:44 PM

Being in the emergency management biz, I’ll chime in here.
Don’t be “that guy” who:
-Doesn’t secure lawn furniture, only to have a folding chair smash their bay window and chaise lounge take out the neighbor’s windshield. Kiddie pools and trampolines will re-locate to the next zip code if not secured. A trampoline in my neighborhood destroyed a fence and deck before breaking apart and transforming into a giant, flying nunchuk.

- Runs out of gas. No electricity means gas stations can’t pump fuel. And the ones that can pump will bend you over and give you a very expensive ”pumpin”$$$. Fill-up this weekend.

-Has to go to the hospital because they don’t have RX meds. This happens all the time. Especially to diabetics. Refill your meds this weekend.

MOST importantly and often overlooked, check-in with any family/friends/neighbors that might need assistance. Make sure they have everything they need. DO NOT assume the gov’t will take care of such people. The gov’t is fairly good at cleaning up the overall mess, but SUCK at caring for individuals. Just a fact. Most pepole that endure undue suffering could have been spared if those closest to them reached out. It way easier to intervene BEFORE a disaster than during/after. Offering to secure an elderly/disabled neighbor’s lawn furniture (for example) will take you 20 minutes but can potentially save A LOT of grief. And that 20 min gesture also lets them know that someone is looking out for them.

I could go on for hours, but I won’t. Taking a few minutes to think ahead is all most folks need to do. While this storm probably won’t claim many lives, it will likely be a huge pain in the a## for those affected. $100 worth of preparations will make the experience a bit easier. Visit your State’s Emergency Management website or FEMA.gov for more info.

Signed- Mother

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lumberjoe

2833 posts in 906 days


#9 posted 10-26-2012 02:50 PM

All good points. One thing I overlooked on last years epic storm was CASH!. A lot of places of business where up on auxiliary power, but did not have any forms of electronic communication available to process credit/debit transactions. The same goes for ATM’s. I’ll be withdrawing about a weeks worth of cash that will cover incidentals (food, gas, diapers, etc)

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

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Sodabowski

2013 posts in 1491 days


#10 posted 10-26-2012 03:02 PM

Living across the pond has its advantages after all…

-- Holy scrap Barkman!

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chrisstef

10858 posts in 1664 days


#11 posted 10-26-2012 03:03 PM

Tedstor – very good tips. Cash is a good idea. Having a newborn in the house has drastically changed my mindset. It wasnt bad when it was just me the wife and the dog but ive got a little guy that cant fend for himself. I wont go unprepared this time. Ill also make a point to pop over the neighbors house this weekend to see if theres anything i can help with. Be good, be safe all.

Youre welcome any time Soda ;)

All of our jobsites are currently in lock down mode. Securing all loose gear and equipment, dewatering pumps for open excavations and erosion control means. My inbox is flooded with jobsite emails. Im glad i dont have to figure out how to cover 600 yards of excavated soils.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

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Mosquito

4698 posts in 950 days


#12 posted 10-26-2012 03:05 PM

Deal. You keep that crap, I’ll keep my snowmobile :-)

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN -- Stanley #45 Evangelist - www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods

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lumberjoe

2833 posts in 906 days


#13 posted 10-26-2012 03:06 PM

You also need to be careful about heat. My daughter was only 4 months old the last time we lost power for a while, and it got into the 20’s for a few days. Infants have much less tolerance for cold than adults. If you can’t heat your house without power, plan on staying somewhere else. Fortunately we have an old wood stove in the basement that did the trick.
You mentioned you have a generator, just make sure it can power whatever heat source you have.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

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chrisstef

10858 posts in 1664 days


#14 posted 10-26-2012 03:11 PM

Roger that, i dont want to backfeed the house at this point without a transfer switch but i do have the means to do so if required. Oviously shut off the main feed. Its not supposed to get out of the 50’s but always vigilant on keeping babystef nice n warm. Plenty of firewood in the basement ready to go as well. We can always cuddle up with the big yellow lab for heat ;) .. she loves it.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

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lumberjoe

2833 posts in 906 days


#15 posted 10-26-2012 03:28 PM

Transfer switches are too expensive. I got one of these:

Square D interlock kit

It’s easy enough to install, a lot cheaper, and (at least in MA) meets code requirements.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

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