LumberJocks

Bandsaw Tension Rod Stripping

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by Haigha posted 10-25-2012 01:05 AM 828 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Haigha's profile

Haigha

3 posts in 726 days


10-25-2012 01:05 AM

Hey all,

I’m hoping that someone here may be able to shine a light on a problem I’ve been having.

I have a Craftex 14” Band Saw (http://www.busybeetools.com/products/ULTIMATE-BANDSAW-14IN.-CRAFTEX-CX-SERIES.html)

The blade tensioning mechanism (rod attached to a handle that threads into a “special nut”) has stripped out maybe a dozen times since I bought the saw a couple of years ago. I haven’t been “cranking” it to excessive tension and I really am at a loss as to what’s going on. A machinist friend of mine took a look at the piece and made me a replacement out of a much harder steel but that hasn’t made any difference.

Has anyone else out there experienced something similar?


9 replies so far

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2959 posts in 973 days


#1 posted 10-25-2012 01:20 AM

Sounds like whatever it screws into is the issue, maybe it got cross threaded at one time and is chewing up the threads on the new screw. Can you post a pic of what it screws into?

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View Haigha's profile

Haigha

3 posts in 726 days


#2 posted 10-25-2012 01:31 AM

I’ll snap a picture of it tomorrow when I get in to the shop.

The threaded rod threads into a specially shaped rectangular “nut”. I’ve tried a brand new, several actually, nut and it doesn’t seem to have any effect. The end result is that the rod and nut both end up stripped.

Having to continually be ordering parts is getting to be murder on my productivity.

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2959 posts in 973 days


#3 posted 10-25-2012 01:38 AM

If you still have one of those old triangular pieces, drill one out so the screw goes through it and put a nut on the other side with a nice thick washer and see if that will hold. I’d look for case hard steel bolt. I’d also install another bolt on the top side, the side with the handle and use that to cinch it all down when I got it tight. If you use the BS on a regular basis, you shouldn’t need to loosen the blade once you get it where you want it. If it set for long periods of time, i’d losen it a little bit maybe 6 wrist turns or so. Something repeatable so you get back to the same tension unless you have one of those meters that tells you the tension.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View REO's profile

REO

626 posts in 760 days


#4 posted 10-25-2012 11:00 AM

||A friend of mine had the same trouble because he changed blades often. first ste was to make a replacement nut and rod with acme threads. It held up till we converted to a quick change mechanism.

View MonteCristo's profile

MonteCristo

2097 posts in 875 days


#5 posted 10-26-2012 02:54 AM

As far as I know, BusyBee isn’t exactly known for high quality so my guess is they have gone cheap on the tensioning system. You should be able to completely compress the tensioning spring without hurting the tensioning rod/nut, not that that is exactly a good idea as far as how much to tension a blade . . .

-- Dwight - "Free legal advice available - contact Dewey, Cheetam & Howe""

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3182 posts in 1362 days


#6 posted 10-26-2012 03:04 AM

You might need to talk to a metallurgist. This can happen when the materials are not correct. Not being one of those people, I can remember if they need to be the same or two different materials. There is a cure for this problem. Now the next question is; is the cure worth the cost?

View Loren's profile

Loren

7725 posts in 2334 days


#7 posted 10-26-2012 03:30 AM

Sounds like the manufacturer may have used threads inappropriate
to the application in order to shave costs. Going to an ACME
or similar robust thread may solve the problem, but considering
the cost and perhaps machining to do the conversion, you may
want to buy a quick release tension mechanism and see if you
can modify it and/or the saw to make it work. I know I could
figure it out, but the confidence comes from fiddling with a lot
of old machinery over the years.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View Haigha's profile

Haigha

3 posts in 726 days


#8 posted 10-26-2012 09:14 PM

Thanks all for the suggestions.

After to close to an hour and a half on the phone with Busy Bee the result was that the “technical customer support” gentleman essentially told me that it’s my fault and that they aren’t prepared to help me out. Apparently he has never heard of anyone else having this issue, there is nothing wrong with the materials used or design of the saw and as a result it must be something I’m doing wrong. I was just a bit surprised…

Towards a solution, I also kind of suspected that the UNC threads were the source of the problem. I’m in the process of “rebuilding” the mechanism with ACME. The stock tension rod is 3/8” but I’m sort of tempted to (since I’m rebuilding it anyway) to switch to a 1/2”. Any thoughts?

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3182 posts in 1362 days


#9 posted 10-26-2012 10:13 PM

Bigger is usually better. There may be fewer threads per inch so it would travel faster. Check on that. If it had few threads per inch you would have to use more muscle power to tension the blade but it would happen at a quicker rate.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase