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combination blade or switch blades for rips and crosscuts ?

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Forum topic by yrob posted 10-24-2012 01:08 AM 1459 views 1 time favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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yrob

340 posts in 3118 days


10-24-2012 01:08 AM

What do you guys usually do ? Do you use a combination blade for all your cuts or do you organize your project and spend thje time to switch from rip to crosscut blades all the time ?

-- Yves


18 replies so far

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7216 posts in 2841 days


#1 posted 10-24-2012 01:13 AM

Both…it depends. Cleanest cuts come from crosscutting with a quality crosscut blade….if I want the best results for a particular crosscut or ply cut, I’ll toss on an 80T Hi-ATB blade. Thicker rips are faster and easier on the motor with an aggressive ripping blade….if I’m ripping a lot of thick dense hardwood, I’ll toss on a 20T or 24T FTG ripper. Otherwise, a good 40T or 50T general purpose/combo blade suffices most of the time…..actually a good 40T or 50T blade will leave a cleaner edge than a 20T or 24T ripper, so if I want cleaner rips I’ll leave the general purpose blade in so long as it doesn’t burn.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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47phord

175 posts in 1703 days


#2 posted 10-24-2012 01:16 AM

I’ll be honest, I use a Diablo 60T combo blade for both 95% of the time and get perfectly acceptable results. The only time I use my rip blade (glue-line rip blade actually) is when I need to rip a lot of stock at once (it goes faster) or when I want an extra crisp edge.

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lumberjoe

2893 posts in 1714 days


#3 posted 10-24-2012 01:22 AM

I posted this in another thread, but it fits better here:
I use a general purpose/combo blade (the Infinity 010-150 is amazing) most of the time. If I am doing a lot of ripping, like squaring the un-jointed side of boards, or ripping thick stock, I use a 24 tooth rip blade.

I also use the combo blade for most cross cuts. It leaves a clean enough finish that a little sanding makes it perfect. I use a cross cut blade when trimming the edges of table top glue up’s, cutting boards, etc. I like to get the pieces square and flat before I trim the edge; which usually includes a full sanding though the grits. In those cases I want a mirror smooth cut.

I also use a cross cut blade on anything where the end grain will be visible and take finish. Since the cut is SOO smooth, I just just go right to the 400 grit sandpaper and save myself some time and hassle of working up from 150 (I estimate that’s about where the combo blade leaves it)

-- https://pinepointwoodworks.wordpress.com/

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7154 posts in 2380 days


#4 posted 10-24-2012 01:44 AM

What knotscott says +10

I have two of these 24T bad boys because they work so well This get used for ripping 8/4 and 12/4. if I haven’t ripped these on the BS. Very pleasant ripping 6/4 milled.

Freud LM72M010 Industrial Heavy Duty Rip Saw Blade 10-Inch by 24t Flat Top 5/8-Inch arbor Ice Coated
You can even crosscut with this blade and, more often than not, you can have glue line straight from the saw.

Once I have stock down to 3/4” My Freud 50T gets a workout. I also have an 80T Freud, but have found that I just do not have the patience for that blade. The 50T cuts much better/faster.

Freud LU84R010 10 Inch X 50 Tooth Red Combination Blade

Freud LU85R010 Teflon - Carbide Industrial Cutoff Blade

MY HANDS DOWN FAVORITE IS THE 24T. It cuts nearly everything and thickness…

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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bondogaposis

4035 posts in 1817 days


#5 posted 10-24-2012 01:54 AM

I use a Freud 50T combo blade in the table saw most of the time. When I have a lot of ripping to do I switch to a Freud 30T glue line rip blade. I also keep a Freud 80T crosscut blade in the RAS at all times for making the final cut to length.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7154 posts in 2380 days


#6 posted 10-24-2012 12:55 PM

Oh yeah, I almost forgot. I have a 12” 50T Freud Diablo on my miter saw for crosscutting 8/4 and 12/4. And most of my initial ripping is done on the 14” Rikon BS w/3/4” 3TPI. By the time most lumber now makes it to the TS it is a max of 1 1/2”. The only exception to that was when I was building the 3” top for my workbench project.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View OggieOglethorpe's profile

OggieOglethorpe

1213 posts in 1576 days


#7 posted 10-24-2012 01:28 PM

I often switch for ripping, as I’m usually doing groups of one or the other. If it’s only a few rips in 3/4” or thinner stock, specially if the edge will get further shaping, I’ll leave the 40 or 50T combo on.

Times that I’ll pretty much always switch out the combo:
- Ripping thick wood (to the 20T)
- Ripping tapers (also to the 20T or 24T)
- Ripping glue lines (to a 30T glue line)
- Very narrow rips (to a thin kerf rip w/ matching insert)
- Ripping burn-prone stock (to the 24 or 30T)
- Ripping construction lumber (to the 20T)
- Plywood (to an 80T)
- Melamine (to an 80T, negative hook)
- Super critical cuts like picture frames (usually an 80T)

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2893 posts in 1714 days


#8 posted 10-24-2012 01:44 PM

Ripping tapers (also to the 20T or 24T)

I actually do the complete opposite. I use a cross cut blade to cut tapers in table legs. I’ve found my LM72 makes a mess of the edges and I get a little burning. It could be the wood though, because I have only cut tapers in Oak to date. With a 60 tooth cross cut blade and going nice and sloe, I get a smooth finish. Is there something I am doing wrong?

-- https://pinepointwoodworks.wordpress.com/

View NiteWalker's profile

NiteWalker

2735 posts in 2043 days


#9 posted 10-24-2012 03:13 PM

I use a combo blade for everything.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

View yrob's profile

yrob

340 posts in 3118 days


#10 posted 10-24-2012 04:27 PM

Thank you all for your input.

So I have a Freud combination blade right now which cuts relatively cleanly. With a backer board when crosscutting its relatively clean but not perfect along the cut.

I think I am going to get a 80T crosscut blade and a 20T rip blade. Probably the woodworker II thin kerf 20T and the Freud 80T ATB crosscut blade. When my budget allows, I probably also will need a glue line rip blade for finish cuts. Meanwhile, I guess I will simply make a pass on my jointer after the rip.

My saw is a Ridgid 3650 and only 1 3/4HP so I prefer going for thin kerf. I never had it bog down so far but I have not tried cutting anything bigger than 4/4 maple. For some projects I may need to cut 8/4.

-- Yves

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7216 posts in 2841 days


#11 posted 10-24-2012 04:31 PM

Your Freud combo blade is plenty capable of glue line rips, so you may not need a specific “glue line” blade just for that task….there’s be a lot of redundancy. The other choices make good sense to me. If money’s tight, I wouldn’t hesitate to look into a Freud Industrial LU87 24T FTG ripper, or similar from CMT 202.024.10, Infinity 010-124, DW Precision Trim DW7124PT, or Irwin Marples….when you get down to the 20T to 24T range the differences are less obvious, and these are all good rip blades too.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2893 posts in 1714 days


#12 posted 10-24-2012 04:34 PM

Check out my review on the Irwin Marples rip blade. I compared that and the Diablo 24 tooth side-by-side. Both were good, the Irwin was better. Both of these blades are under 30$. Also be aware the glue line rip blades are only recommended for a maximum thickness of 1”, so they are not ideal for prepping 8/4 stock.

-- https://pinepointwoodworks.wordpress.com/

View crank49's profile

crank49

3981 posts in 2437 days


#13 posted 10-24-2012 04:39 PM

I do most of my cross cuts on my miter saw and it has a 90 tooth crosscut blade on it.
I keep a 54 tooth combo blade on my table saw most of the time.
If I were going to do a lot of long ripping, especially on thick stock, I’d swap in a rip blade on the TS.

Overall, the combo blade makes me happy most of the time, and I hate changing out blades.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

View RogerM's profile

RogerM

764 posts in 1865 days


#14 posted 10-24-2012 04:49 PM

Install a Forrest Woodworker II blade and do both ripping and crosscuts with superior results. The time you will save switching blades will pay for the Forrest.

-- Roger M, Aiken, SC

View OggieOglethorpe's profile

OggieOglethorpe

1213 posts in 1576 days


#15 posted 10-24-2012 05:38 PM

@ Lumberjoe:
I actually do the complete opposite. I use a cross cut blade to cut tapers in table legs. I’ve found my LM72 makes a mess of the edges and I get a little burning. It could be the wood though, because I have only cut tapers in Oak to date. With a 60 tooth cross cut blade and going nice and sloe, I get a smooth finish. Is there something I am doing wrong?

Too slow feeding, necessitated by too many blade teeth, can cause burning, that’s the point of the rip blade. As far as the edges, I use a shop-made taper sled that provides zero clearance support on the bottom edge. The sled is simply a single runner attached to a 3/4” plywood floor, with locator blocks and DeStaco clamps screwed to the face. The first pass down the miter slot trims the edge of the floor. This locates the kerf. Attach the blocks and clamps using a line drawn on the first leg and the edge of the floor to locate. For future tapers, unscrew the blocks and move them as necessary.

The brown area is the offcut… Clamps not shown, as I didn’t feel like drawing them in Sketchup.

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