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Forum topic by Sandra posted 10-23-2012 12:04 PM 884 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Sandra

6983 posts in 1538 days


10-23-2012 12:04 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question pine

Good morning all,

I’m trying to design a wrapping station for my newly built craft area in our basement. The wall where it will be mounted is an interior wall which backs onto a storage closet. The storage closet is drywalled also. I’ve wrapped my mind around how I’d like the paper to be stored (pardon the pun) but have been toying with the idea of building something under the wrapping station to store gift bags. I’m more of a ‘follow the plans’ kind of person, so this is a stretch. I have a few questions if anyone can oblige. I have searched online, but can’t find what I’m looking for.

The unit will be made of pine and painted. I have access to most shop tools.
The top of the unit would be something like this, minus the drawers:

For the bottom of the unit, I was thinking something like this, coming out a few inches from the wall and ideally using the space between the two walls as well:

Here are my questions -
The wall itself measures 45” from the corner to the trim on the closet door -

I located a stud at the midway point but am not picking up another one. Is that normal for that size wall? I’m used to 16” from centre to centre. With the stud in the middle of the wall, am I nuts for trying to do a built in?

-I would prefer the gift bags to be out of sight, and thought the flour bin idea might work. Would you have any other suggestions, or have any ideas for building something like that keeping the wall stud in mind?

Thanks
Sandra

-- No, I don't want to buy the pink hammer.


14 replies so far

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

22005 posts in 1801 days


#1 posted 10-23-2012 12:14 PM

Studs “should be” 16 inches on center. It is possible that the one you have located is an extra added in for some reason. A stud finder should be able to find them. I have seen people think they have located a stud only to find it’s a water pipe :-(

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

3059 posts in 1749 days


#2 posted 10-23-2012 12:15 PM

Sometimes basements are framed with 20” or even 24” centers. Do you have a stud finder?
I know that when I finished out my basement there were some walls that you could not do 16” centers because of a pipe or electric or just because it was the last wall framed and 16” centers were not even, so maybe I’d do 14” or 18” between a few. Tap the wall with a mallet and see if you can hear the stud if the finder wont find one. You can also cut a small square hole and have a look behind if you think there may be pipes there.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View Sandra's profile

Sandra

6983 posts in 1538 days


#3 posted 10-23-2012 12:24 PM

I used a stud finder, but I agree, something is amiss. The wall was just built so I know for sure there is no plumbing or electrical, but I didn’t pay attention to the studs. Will have to do a look-see.

-- No, I don't want to buy the pink hammer.

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RussellAP

3059 posts in 1749 days


#4 posted 10-23-2012 12:27 PM

Also just guessing here, but if there is a shower on the other side of that wall, look for 10 -12” centers.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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Sandra

6983 posts in 1538 days


#5 posted 10-23-2012 12:30 PM

The other side of the wall is a storage closet. It was built specifically to hold all of our outdoor gear. The electrical panel is on the same exterior wall as the window, but inside the closet. The wiring that was run in the closet goes through another wall altogether.

-- No, I don't want to buy the pink hammer.

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RussellAP

3059 posts in 1749 days


#6 posted 10-23-2012 12:32 PM

That’s good to know…did you finish this basement?

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View Sandra's profile

Sandra

6983 posts in 1538 days


#7 posted 10-23-2012 12:38 PM

No – that would be way beyond my abilities. I was watching with great interest however!
I just went back down and measured again and used the stud finder again.
The wall is 48” wide and I’m locating the stud just shy of centre at 23 1/2. If I’m missing a stud, it seems odd that one would be at 12” from the corner….. Thanks for the help. A little drywall repair wouldn’t kill me, but I’m trying to figure out how I would build this thing before hacking into a brand new wall.

-- No, I don't want to buy the pink hammer.

View jdmaher's profile

jdmaher

384 posts in 2042 days


#8 posted 10-23-2012 01:03 PM

I wouldn’t do a built-in.

You’re going to surface mount the upper cabinet, right? So a built-in base and a surface-mount top don’t really match anyway.

If you DO use the space “in the wall”, you’re only going to pick up about 1.5” inches anyway (by what, 30” high?). Using a flour bin approach will, I believe, cause you to lose more volume than you’d gain. Maybe I don’t get it.

If it’s a wrapping station, wouldn’t you want a a big flat surface just under the wraps? So, make a base cabinet with doors (45”W x 30”H x 24”D). Maybe with pull-outs – like you see for kitchen garbage cans – and use the type of stacking bins shown in your photos. One (or more) of thse bins could hold a lot of folded gift bags.

-- Jim Maher, Illinois

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2202 posts in 2621 days


#9 posted 10-23-2012 01:07 PM

Is there an outlet in that wall? The stud will typically be alongside the outlet since the box needs something to nail into with new installations. If so, find which side of the box the stud is on and measure your 16” centers from there.

When you start close to a corner, there can be an number of reasons to add another stud where it is unexpected.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View Sandra's profile

Sandra

6983 posts in 1538 days


#10 posted 10-23-2012 01:25 PM

Thanks Jim – what you’re saying make sense. Any space gained wouldn’t be worth the pia factor.
Directly across from the wrapping station wall is my craft area with countertop space for wrapping, so I don’t need a fixed surface under the wrapping paper. My other wild idea was a drop down table top.

Not a good photo, but here’s the view of my area. The wall is to the right of the window. I can’t seem to post that part of the picture, but if you click on the photo and drag it away a bit, you can see the closet wall…

-- No, I don't want to buy the pink hammer.

View Sandra's profile

Sandra

6983 posts in 1538 days


#11 posted 10-23-2012 01:28 PM

jay – no outlet in the wall. Wall is 48” from corner to doorway into the closet.

Thanks

-- No, I don't want to buy the pink hammer.

View jdmaher's profile

jdmaher

384 posts in 2042 days


#12 posted 10-23-2012 02:43 PM

Okay. So, primary purpose is to store gift bags. And maybe other “flat” wrapping accessories like tissue paper or folded sheets of wrapping?

How about adapting the following idea (from Amazon):

That is, make a “lower” portion of the “upper” cabinet, with several such angled bins. It could extend as low as you like (down to the base molding on the wall). In essence, a full-length hanging cabinet.

Which reminds me, how you gonna hang that upper cabinet with only one stud in the wall? If it were me, I’d extend the upper cabinet UP, all the way to the ceiling, and lag screw it into the wall header. I suppose you could widen it to use all the available width and hit the studs at the wall ends, but some “whitespace” at the sides might look nice and avoid a clearance obstacle at the closet door.

-- Jim Maher, Illinois

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

7703 posts in 2305 days


#13 posted 10-23-2012 04:26 PM

Sandra,

Get a ladder and see if you cant take out the ceiling tiles on that wall side. use a flashlight if it is too dark. there shuold be some space to allow you to see what is nailed in. possibly a makeup mirror on a stand would improve viewing.

Re: upper cabinet you can set some studs floor to ceiling using top and bottom plate. w plywood back anchor to the available studs. Should prevent racking, (left right movement from downward pressure. The wrapping table/cabinet can be anchored to the plywood . This allows for pressure down and out if you hang somethng like wrapping paper holder. If the rolls are not 50 or 100 pounds then shuoldn’t be a problem.

Box store( Lowes) sell unfinished base cabinets and countertops.

Just thinking about the problem…Good luck! Gotta go to the day job. LOL!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View Sandra's profile

Sandra

6983 posts in 1538 days


#14 posted 10-23-2012 04:30 PM

Oh, I like that idea Jim – will have to take that into consideration.

Doc, thanks for the tips. It’s no problem moving the ceiling tiles – hadn’t thought of that. I’ll head down and take a look.

Have a great day.

-- No, I don't want to buy the pink hammer.

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