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Finishing OLD Recycled Redwood

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Forum topic by gfadvm posted 648 days ago 829 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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gfadvm

10606 posts in 1296 days


648 days ago

I have some redwood 1×12s that came from a really old house torn down in Ks. The problem I’m having is that it soaks up finish like a sponge! Three coats of undiluted Zinsser shellac and NO evidence of any finish on the surface. It just soaks in. Any thoughts other than to just keep laying on more coats? Thanks for looking.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm


13 replies so far

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patron

12978 posts in 1947 days


#1 posted 648 days ago

maybe let each coat dry some first
or the wet ones will keep soaking in
deeper and deeper

you need to build a ‘dam’
in the cells
close to the surface first

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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gfadvm

10606 posts in 1296 days


#2 posted 648 days ago

“let each coat dry some first” Shellac dries really fast anyway but on this wood it is dry to touch in 1-2 minutes. Maybe put on 2-3 coats, leave it overnight and then try some more? I’m not married to the shellac if another finish would give me a semi-gloss with less hassle. Maybe some nice thick Spar Urethane? Always appreciate your input David.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View Cajun  Box Sculptor's profile

Cajun Box Sculptor

4940 posts in 1914 days


#3 posted 648 days ago

How about a sanding sealer….

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rrww

257 posts in 719 days


#4 posted 648 days ago

I have used a medium-heavy coat of sanding sealer (and let fully dry) that I sprayed on. I finished with a lacquer semi-gloss top coat. The sanding sealer did the job. I had a whole pile of 1×6 reclaimed redwood. The lacquer by itself soaked in just like its doing to you. Sure does look good once its done!

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Monte Pittman

13393 posts in 944 days


#5 posted 648 days ago

I thought of sanding sealer as well.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it. - It's not ability that we often lack, but the patience to use our ability

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patron

12978 posts in 1947 days


#6 posted 648 days ago

when sanding sealers first came out
they were very sensitive
only ones made for lacquer
would work for lacquer
then sealers came out for poly

i am not sure these days
but with all the new products
i think they work for most now

all the hype from chemical manufacturers
would have you believe only THEIR stuff works
(like lacquer thinner bygi3479 should be used with this product)
making more money for them

i got to the store
and buy what i can afford
if it says lacquer thinner
that’s what i use
regardless of who makes it
(i did buy some new paint thiner that is water based
and doesn’t do anything
it won’t even start a fire in my stove) lol

i like the taste of lipstick
whether cheap or expensive

gluckonthisgfadvm

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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Boxguy

1413 posts in 873 days


#7 posted 648 days ago

Andy, I have had some luck with a nice thick coat of Minwax Tung Oil as my first coat or two on dry redwood. It soaks in but does seem to start a process of sealing. I let it dry a day or two between coats. Old redwood does really soak in the finish. If it has that chalky, powdery top layer I’d plane it first.

-- Big Al in IN

View Nate Meadows's profile

Nate Meadows

1077 posts in 812 days


#8 posted 647 days ago

I am a big fan of Shellac for many things. I use Miniwax Sanding Sealer before using Shellac and it always turns out great. Just let the Sanding Sealer dry over night!

Nate

-- "With a little bit of faith, and some imagination, you can build anything!" Nate

View Blackbear's profile

Blackbear

81 posts in 825 days


#9 posted 647 days ago

I haven’t finished redwood, but I have had some Mahogany that really soaked up finish. I used some Danish Oil and wet sanded the surface with the oil with 600 grit sandpaper. The result was a fine slurry that pushed into the pores and did a fair job sealing the wood. After a night of drying I then applied another coat with better results.

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gfadvm

10606 posts in 1296 days


#10 posted 647 days ago

I thought sanding sealer was shellac (not sure just what it is now). I’ll try some as it was the most recommended solution. In the meantime I found sanding to 600 grit helps a lot (especially on the end grain). Is that sanding sealer compatable with all finishes or just???? Thanks for the suggestions all.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View AJswoodshop's profile

AJswoodshop

1057 posts in 882 days


#11 posted 647 days ago

I thought of sanding sealer too. Good luck!

-- If I can do it.....so can you! -AJswoodshop

View KarenW's profile

KarenW

123 posts in 794 days


#12 posted 646 days ago

Totally agree with Patron – ”all the hype from chemical manufacturers
would have you believe only THEIR stuff works
(like lacquer thinner bygi3479 should be used with this product)
making more money for them

Whatever you use, sand with at least a 220 grit paper before you put on the next coat. Sanding not only smooths the surface but also helps seal the surface, allowing you to start building up coats rather than having them soak in. If you’ve ever over-sanded an area (trying to remove a scratch or a spot of glue) then tried to stain the piece, the resulting light area where you’ve over-sanded is proof of this.

-- Happiness does not come from doing easy work but from the afterglow of satisfaction that comes after the achievement of a difficult task that demanded our best. --Theodore I. Rubin

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gfadvm

10606 posts in 1296 days


#13 posted 646 days ago

Haven’t tried the sanding sealer but sanding the wood to 600 grit and sanding the shellac is working very well. Maybe sanding to that fine a grit is burnishing the wood. Thanks for the input.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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