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Is this a good approach to walnut/maple lamination?

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Forum topic by BinghamtonEd posted 10-22-2012 07:42 PM 1100 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1830 days


10-22-2012 07:42 PM

My upcoming project is going to be a baby gate for our house. To give a interesting look, I decided I would like to sandwich a thin layer of maple in between two thicker layers of walnut, to give it a nice highlight around the edges. The other alternative is to do an all-walnut construction, and then cut a groove down the middle of the pieces and inlay smaller pieces of maple. All joints are going to be M&T.

Which way will be more stable? The last thing I want is for this gate to warp. I could :
- Laminate 4/4 pieces of walnut to get to my final width, then cut the groove and inlay the maple
- Laminate 4/4 pieces of walnut with a 1/4 piece of maple in between
- Use 8/4 walnut and cut the groove and inlay the maple.

For clarification, here is a horrible MS paint sketch, showing the front and side view (side view shows maple).

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.


11 replies so far

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BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1830 days


#1 posted 10-23-2012 07:15 PM

Anybody?

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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chrisstef

15658 posts in 2467 days


#2 posted 10-23-2012 07:19 PM

I would just give it the ole glue sandwich. I dont see much chance of it warping either way you want to do it and glueing would certainly be the easiest IMO.

-- rock, chalk, jayhawk

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ChrisK

1809 posts in 2542 days


#3 posted 10-23-2012 07:26 PM

The 4/4 to maple to 4/4 glue method will help prevent warping as you will be able to alternate the grain on the walnut.

-- Chris K

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BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1830 days


#4 posted 10-23-2012 07:29 PM

Thanks for the responses. I’m glad my preferred method of sandwiching 3 layers, with the outer layers alternating, seems to be applicable.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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AandCstyle

2566 posts in 1718 days


#5 posted 10-23-2012 11:25 PM

Ed, to each his own, but IMO you are going through a lot of work for very little visual return. Have you thought about rotating the spindles 90* so the maple shows? Just my opinion FWIW.

-- Art

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crashn

528 posts in 1926 days


#6 posted 10-24-2012 12:54 AM

i made a solid walnut baby gate, has not warped in 2 years. As long as your lumber is dry and acclimated, you should be good. I do like the idea of a sandwich for visual appeal.

-- Crashn - the only thing I make more of than sawdust is mistakes

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RussellAP

3059 posts in 1747 days


#7 posted 10-24-2012 12:59 AM

For something that small you don’t have to worry about it. Tight Bond II.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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klassenl

169 posts in 2120 days


#8 posted 10-24-2012 03:25 AM

I made a baby gate in similar style but I used spruce (2×6) and had no problems with it going out of square. I don’t think that you will have too much to worry about as long as you have good stock.

-- When questioned about using glue on a garbage bin I responded, "Wood working is about good technique and lots of glue........I have the glue part down."

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BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1830 days


#9 posted 10-24-2012 01:17 PM

Thanks for all of the comments.

Art – Rotating the spindles is a nice idea, for my application I think I will keep them square, and soften the corners of them with a small stopped cove routed along each corner of the spindles. My plan is to make this walnut/maple sandwich for all pieces (the outer frame and spindles). The spindles will be narrower than the outer frame. So long as I plane my final laminations equally on both sides (keeping the maple dead center), I hope to have a visually continuous band of maple that flows through the entire piece.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2893 posts in 1709 days


#10 posted 10-24-2012 02:37 PM

I made a table (almost done) and did the same thing for a shelf on the bottom. My only problem was sanding/finishing. Make sure you get ALL that walnut sawdust off. The nice gleaming white Ash sandwiched between the walnut is noticeably darker than the rest of the ash in the table.

-- https://pinepointwoodworks.wordpress.com/

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BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1830 days


#11 posted 10-24-2012 03:50 PM

My other idea, for cost reasons, is to use poplar instead of walnut. I have some Tran-Tint dye that I could use, however if I do that. I would have to dye the wood before the lamination, and I don’t know if I could put finish on (thinking Danish Oil) without smearing the dye into the maple. Any ideas?

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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