LumberJocks

Flamed Maple Finish

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by dpwalker posted 10-18-2012 05:23 PM 2150 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View dpwalker's profile

dpwalker

265 posts in 1483 days


10-18-2012 05:23 PM

Can anyone tell me how to get a finish like this? Notice the white/cream parts of the flames. I can do blue & black but the white has me stumped…!

https://s3.amazonaws.com/lumberjocks.com/mc3myyw.jpg!

-- You have not really lived until you do something for someone who can never repay you.


18 replies so far

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1702 days


#1 posted 10-18-2012 05:37 PM

It’s hard to tell from the computer I’m on, but is it actually white, or is it just the light natural maple showing through? Again, hard to tell, but it looks to me like it might just be the maple showing through?

If I would’ve kept sanding more on this trivet, the maple would’ve come through even more. I simply dyed it all blue, then sanded it down a bit, lightly exposing a little of the natural wood underneath.

I wonder if doing something like white washing it by adding an alcohol-friendly dye to Seal Coat, then applying a coat of the dyed Seal Coat, then lightly sand to remove part of it down to the bare wood, then add the blue? I’m thinking that may get the dye down into the softer grain, then once you sand, you’d be exposing part of the wood to accept the blue dye. Just don’t use an alcohol-based blue, and have it essentially “sit” on top of the shellac, then wipe it down, leaving your white in-place. Not the best description, but I’m thinking something like that might work, if I’m thinking about it correctly? Does this sound like a feasible option?

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View HoosierDude's profile

HoosierDude

48 posts in 1667 days


#2 posted 10-18-2012 05:40 PM

Here is one way to do it.

-- Paul Lyons

View bhog's profile

bhog

2135 posts in 1342 days


#3 posted 10-18-2012 05:50 PM

It kinda looks like a slight chamfer to me, which would go down to bare wood through any dye.

-- I don't drive a Prius.

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1702 days


#4 posted 10-18-2012 05:52 PM

You’ve probably already seen Trifern’s popular post, describing his technique, here. Just thought I’d mention that as well.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1810 days


#5 posted 10-18-2012 06:37 PM

The Trifern post is great.

Try Ed’s thread here…

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/27475

Lots of experimentation done there.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View shampeon's profile

shampeon

1376 posts in 835 days


#6 posted 10-18-2012 07:56 PM

bhog: That’s a guitar, so the natural color edge is flamed maple binding, applied after the maple top was dyed.

The various posters here got it right. Dye the entire top black, then sand back, then dye the entire thing blue. Seal it up, then proceed with finishing coats.

If you want more contrast between the flames, you dye it black, sand it back, then spray a thin blue-tinted toner coat. Seal it, then add the top coats. The flame will pop a ton as the clear layers are added.

Here’s a good thread showing a Les Paul getting refinished with the double staining technique:
http://www.mylespaul.com/forums/luthiers-corner/107455-r9-top-refinish.html

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

View dpwalker's profile

dpwalker

265 posts in 1483 days


#7 posted 10-18-2012 08:09 PM

While I appreciate & thank you all for the replies maybe I wasn’t clear in my first post. I am not referring to the body binding, but rather the white/cream streaks in the flames themselves. It appears to be the natural maple itself showing thru as Jonathan suggested. Maybe they only dyed blue & didn’t use black & sanded down? Now that I study the picture again that is how it appears to me. Anyone agree?

-- You have not really lived until you do something for someone who can never repay you.

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1810 days


#8 posted 10-18-2012 08:21 PM

I think this was done first with black dye to pop the grain, then sanded back entirely. It was likely then uniformly sprayed with the blue dye…the color of which would be the light blue you see in the “whiter” areas. The dark blue you are seeing is a blend of the black and light blue dyes.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View shampeon's profile

shampeon

1376 posts in 835 days


#9 posted 10-18-2012 08:24 PM

The first part doesn’t have to use black dye. It could be a dark blue dye, followed by a light blue dye. Regardless, there’s still a light blue tone to the parts you’re describing as white or cream.

I guess it goes without saying that you need a very heavily flamed piece of maple to make this look like the piece you’re trying to emulate.

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1810 days


#10 posted 10-18-2012 08:29 PM

I agree, Ian. But I think that first dye is dark.

It’s not a question of what a light blue looks like over white and black, but rather how it appears over a light and dark canvas.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View BigYin's profile

BigYin

231 posts in 1068 days


#11 posted 10-18-2012 09:01 PM

http://i668.photobucket.com/albums/vv47/bigyin1961/075.jpg
http://i668.photobucket.com/albums/vv47/bigyin1961/067.jpg

some other pictures there as well

Clearcoat all surface
mask edge
blue clear coat in layers more layers to outside makes it darker
clearcoat again
There is no seperate edging, just the clear false edging.

-- ... Never Apologise For Being Right ...

View HalDougherty's profile

HalDougherty

1820 posts in 1889 days


#12 posted 10-18-2012 09:55 PM

To get this effect on maple, you first have to be coloring tiger or flame maple. You can see the streaks of cross grain wood in the grain before you dye it. The reason the stripes are darker after dying, is the cross grain absorbs more dye than the grain running lengthwise. Trifern also uses 3 dye layers. The first one is black, the second is the main color coat and the third is a yellow dye coat. It highlights the grain even more after the yellow dye.

-- Hal, Tennessee http://www.first285.com

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1702 days


#13 posted 10-19-2012 05:14 AM

So I recommended Trifern’s tutorial/post, yet suggested something else before doing so. Not enough sleep last night, nor enough coffee this morning, in addition to thinking about blending paint lately was a bad combination for my first post… sorry. It’s also clearer in looking at it at home on a nice monitor, versus what I was viewing it on earlier.

In thinking about this a couple of times today, I think it’s either a dark blue overall, or black first, as others have said above. The really dark color (blue, black, whatever) should really heighten and darken the grain first, and really show up after sanding it back, then hitting it with blue, and sanding back until you get down to more or less the first layer of wood.

Basically not only building layers of color, but showcasing the differences in depth between them, and especially the differences between the two hardnesses of wood in the maple, which allows for this type of technique to work well in the first place.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1810 days


#14 posted 10-19-2012 12:11 PM

Yep, that’s right, Jonathan.

I really recommend the thread link I posted above. It’s one of my favorite threads on LJ’s and I followed it closely when Ed was doing all his experiments with a flame-maple amp head. The result was magnificent and it shows everything you need to know to do that techniques with dyes.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1702 days


#15 posted 10-19-2012 02:21 PM

Jay,

I will have to take a look at Ed’s thread when I have a bit of time later this morning. It’s something I’ve always wanted to experiment with and learn more about, as I’ve only used dye on the trivet I linked to above, and the little Bud Light bottle cap balancer, so the more I can read about it, the better. Thank you.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

showing 1 through 15 of 18 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase