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What is Danish Oil

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Forum topic by gfadvm posted 10-18-2012 02:33 AM 3102 views 6 times favorited 44 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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gfadvm

11548 posts in 1443 days


10-18-2012 02:33 AM

Topic tags/keywords: danish oil

I know this is a very popular finish but I’m unclear as to exactly what it’s composed of. Is it an oil/poly/MS combo? or what?

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm


44 replies so far

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Monte Pittman

15511 posts in 1091 days


#1 posted 10-18-2012 02:36 AM

I think it’s a type of tung oil

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

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patron

13182 posts in 2093 days


#2 posted 10-18-2012 02:39 AM

from wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Danish_oil

Danish oil is a wood finishing oil, made of either Tung oil or Polymerized Linseed oil.

Danish oil is a hard drying oil which provides a tough, water-resistant finish. It can be used as a finish, or as a primer or sealer on bare wood before applying paint or varnish.

When used, Danish oil provides a satin finish and provides coverage of approx 12.5 sq. m/l (600 sq. ft./gallon) and is usually applied over a course of three coats by brush or cloth, with any excess being wiped off shortly after application. The finish is left to dry for around 6-24 hours between coats, depending on the mixture being used and the wood being treated.

Rags used for Danish oil may spontaneously combust and start fires, so it is best to dry rags flat before disposing of them.

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View Eric in central Florida's profile

Eric in central Florida

3674 posts in 2328 days


#3 posted 10-18-2012 02:48 AM

I found the same definition as David. (above)

I get pretty much the same results using boiled Lindseed Oil and then a cut down polyurethane coat, at a lot less expense.

i don’t make those big horse doctor bucks !
(only kidding Andy) lol

-- All glory comes from daring to begin.

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Arminius

304 posts in 2556 days


#4 posted 10-18-2012 03:02 AM

It is basically an oil/varnish blend, with some properties of both, usually wiped on. Key concept is that it both penetrates and builds up a finish – though the ‘build’ is minimal, it can barely be felt. The oil can be a linseed or tung oil base. The drying oil component of the varnish (resin + solvent +drying oil) is usually something with the same base- I am not aware of a Danish oil blend that has polyurethane, though it is probably possible.

Woodwrecker is getting similar results because it is not that different in effect.

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1911 days


#5 posted 10-18-2012 03:02 AM

There’s a lot of mystery to Danish oil, but it is chiefly tung or linseed oil that has been polymerized for faster drying. Many Danish oils also include varnish resins to allow it to build up a thin film coat, but that varies with the product and, IME, doesn’t really happen in practice. It’s perhaps just a part of the polymerization..

Many people will opt for their own mixtures of oil/varnish blends, combining BLO or tung oil with something like a polyurethane varnish and a solvent like mineral spirits or turpentine. The ratios of the mixes vary from kettle to kettle, but Krenov was known for liking an even 1:1:1 mix of the three parts. Regardless, doing it yourself will build a better film finish than any of the danish oil products.

That said, I like Danish oil. It’s fast drying and does the job of any typical oil…I just don’t look for it to build up any type of finish.

BTW, some Danish oil brands like the Watco advertise the “varnish” nature of the product. Others like Tried and True make no mention of hardening outside the polymerization of the oil itself. But most feel the spirit of the Danish oil is as described above…an oil/varnish blend.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

7192 posts in 2056 days


#6 posted 10-18-2012 03:10 AM

it starts out from the mogambo nut….....LOL…ok andy i wont go any further, you didnt comment on my last funny post so i guess , well never mind…if anyone wants to know, well forget it, a bored man who thought he was funny…

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

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Kelby

133 posts in 1163 days


#7 posted 10-18-2012 03:20 AM

My favorite finish. Easy to mix your own, easy to apply (although it takes some time), and delivers phenominal results if you are patient.

Here’s my system (after sanding your project to 220 grit):

1. Mix equal parts mineral spirits, oil (either linseed or tung), and varnish (you can use poly, but I don’t like it quite as well).

2. Use a brush or paper towel to apply a coat over the wood, and let it sit for 15-30 minutes (varies by temp, humidity, and products you are using in your mix). Don’t let it get tacky.

3. Using paper towels or rags, wipe off all excess. Be VERY CAREFUL to let your rags/paper towels dry in a safe way—they can spontaneously combust if you put oily rags in a pile.

4. Let dry 24 hours.

5. Repeat steps 2-4. However, this time, after applying the Danish oil and before wiping the excess, wet-sand your project with 320 grit wet or dry. Then wipe the excess oil off.

6. Repeat step 5, but this time go up to 400 grit.

7. Repeat with 600 grit.

8. Go up as high as you like—I personally prefer to go to 2000 grit.

This process takes at least a week, because you need to let it dry 24 hours between each coat.

When finished, I prefer to apply a coat of wax.

The finish brings out the color of the wood and gives a very light lustre to it, but does not look like it has a coating it the way lacquer or varnish/urethane do. Sanded very fine with a coat of wax, the project feels extremely soft and smooth and compels people to touch it.

-- Kelby

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CharlieM1958

15817 posts in 2971 days


#8 posted 10-18-2012 03:25 AM

You guys are all wrong. Making Danish oil involves a bunch of Scandinavians and a very large garlic press.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Roger Clark aka Rex's profile

Roger Clark aka Rex

6940 posts in 2187 days


#9 posted 10-18-2012 03:33 AM

That’s right Charlie, and they use that squeezed oil to add to puff pastry breakfast cakes, hence Danish Pastries.

-- Roger-R, Republic of Texas. "Always look on the Bright Side of Life" - An eyeball to eyeball confrontation with a blind person is as complete waste of Time.

View gfadvm's profile (online now)

gfadvm

11548 posts in 1443 days


#10 posted 10-18-2012 03:33 AM

Thanks for all the quick responses. That’s why I love this site. I was curious as to whether you could build up some thickness since I thought it contained poly or “varnish”. I guess my next post will be : what is “varnish”??? Roger and Charlie are currently in a parallel universe so don’t mind them! And my friend Grizz is always kinda in a world of his own :-)

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View Roger Clark aka Rex's profile

Roger Clark aka Rex

6940 posts in 2187 days


#11 posted 10-18-2012 03:36 AM

gfadvm, my next question will be: Isn’t it past your bedtime?

-- Roger-R, Republic of Texas. "Always look on the Bright Side of Life" - An eyeball to eyeball confrontation with a blind person is as complete waste of Time.

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gfadvm

11548 posts in 1443 days


#12 posted 10-18-2012 03:39 AM

G’night all.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View Roger Clark aka Rex's profile

Roger Clark aka Rex

6940 posts in 2187 days


#13 posted 10-18-2012 03:40 AM

Goodnight Andy, Charlie and I will carry on cruisin’

-- Roger-R, Republic of Texas. "Always look on the Bright Side of Life" - An eyeball to eyeball confrontation with a blind person is as complete waste of Time.

View rance's profile

rance

4148 posts in 1913 days


#14 posted 10-18-2012 03:42 AM

I too think it is made up of a bunch of Danes. :)

I’ve never gone past three coats. I’d like to try the methods above. Thanks for sharing.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

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patron

13182 posts in 2093 days


#15 posted 10-18-2012 03:46 AM

have you tried the stuff
on your arms

after you deal with the horses

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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