LumberJocks

Ever heard of this saw?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by ohtimberwolf posted 10-17-2012 12:48 AM 1100 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View ohtimberwolf's profile

ohtimberwolf

274 posts in 1019 days


10-17-2012 12:48 AM

Found this on CL and am puzzled. Any information on it would be interesting. Thanks

http://akroncanton.craigslist.org/tls/3306998723.html

-- Used to be a barn cat, now a lap cat...


17 replies so far

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3159 posts in 1342 days


#1 posted 10-17-2012 12:52 AM

The radial arm….the other one must be an organ company saw….couldn’t resist. No I have never heard of it but it might be regional

View ohtimberwolf's profile

ohtimberwolf

274 posts in 1019 days


#2 posted 10-17-2012 01:07 AM

Not sure what you mean by an organ company saw. Do you mean something to cut off fingers and such? Just wondering.

-- Used to be a barn cat, now a lap cat...

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3159 posts in 1342 days


#3 posted 10-17-2012 01:12 AM

No, I was just going on with a line of…..Malarky I think was the word thrown out last week. Hammond organ company. They made a lot of organs and many of them were the small type you could find in a persons home.

View Loren's profile

Loren

7625 posts in 2314 days


#4 posted 10-17-2012 03:20 AM

It’s a linotype saw. I have one – use it all the time for
cutting small parts precisely, especially aluminum. That’s
a good deal. Those saws cut dead square.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View ohtimberwolf's profile

ohtimberwolf

274 posts in 1019 days


#5 posted 10-17-2012 10:09 AM

Thanks guys I had no clue…

-- Used to be a barn cat, now a lap cat...

View kizerpea's profile

kizerpea

746 posts in 1034 days


#6 posted 10-17-2012 01:08 PM

I found it on OWWM web sight…hammond machine co. kalamozoo mi. check it out.

you can find any old machine there.

-- IF YOUR NOT MAKING DUST...YOU ARE COLLECTING IT! SOUTH CAROLINA.

View yrob's profile

yrob

340 posts in 2319 days


#7 posted 10-17-2012 06:49 PM

hammond used to make saws especially customized for printers. These glider saws had micro-adjustments and they were designed to cut the spacing between type setting letters. They have zero side play and are very very accurate. I can not say for sure from this picture if this is one of those with the missing gliding mechanism.

-- Yves

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

5010 posts in 1464 days


#8 posted 10-17-2012 07:34 PM

If it cuts linotype “mats” I know exactly why it needs the precision.
As a little guy I had the opportunity to watch my dad type-set with a linotype in his small country newspaper shop.
I sat for hours marveling at the intricacies of that wonderful machine. I figured out for myself how it accomplished every one of it’s many diverse functions and to this day I credit it and the other vintage machines in my dad’s shop with giving me the ability to visualize, plan and design as well as I can.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View sixstring's profile

sixstring

296 posts in 910 days


#9 posted 10-17-2012 07:47 PM

Does that table saw have a 10” blade or smaller? Hard to tell by the pic, but after others suggested it’s a linotype saw, i started thinking it may just have a 7” blade. Maybe not, just my 2 cents…

Looks interesting for sure. Cant be a bad purchase at $100 for both machines. Cant say I’m a RAS fan, but hell, it cuts right?

-- JC Garcia, Concord, CA : "It's easier to ask forgiveness than permission..."

View teejk's profile

teejk

1215 posts in 1351 days


#10 posted 10-17-2012 08:18 PM

shipwright…they should have charged admission to watch that linotype machine work! I worked for a small town weekly and the owner was a pro (although I think he must have had a deluxe model since I recall it cut the type in place).

those huge font cases…somehow the operator would type a few letters and those pieces fell down into the holder…once completed, send the line to the hot lead, then hit something to return the lino pieces back to the font case where they somehow got into the correct spot to be used for the next line. What an amazing piece of machinery! We were pretty much in the offset mode at the time but still used the lino for wedding invitations and funeral cards on the old cast iron letter presses.

View juniorjock's profile

juniorjock

1930 posts in 2432 days


#11 posted 10-17-2012 08:53 PM

When I first began working with my Dad at our weekly paper, he told me that he had heard that there were more than 50,000 moving parts on a linotype. He also said that the guy that invented the linotype actually went crazy before he died. Doubt that either is true. If you ask me, I’d say that the thing had at least 100,000 moving parts and the guy that invented it was probably crazy before he started working on the machine. There’s just something about working in a spot where there is melted lead being shot into a mold that’s just about a foot or so from your face. I understand what teejk is saying. We were making the change to offset printing about the time I started working with my Dad and about the only thing the linotype was used for was funeral cards and programs. No cost printing the cards on the old C&P press (hand fed, of course).

View teejk's profile

teejk

1215 posts in 1351 days


#12 posted 10-17-2012 09:52 PM

juniorjock…this is all OT but that linotype machine still has me shaking my head at all the things that happened when someone started typing. People “ooh and ahh” over a marble machine or a set of dominoes…no comparison! For anybody wondering about it, google linotype museum.

My boss had a hand-feed letter press but also an auto feed press (we were “high tech” in the world of 1910 machinery). To this day I’m surprised the floor held it (and now that I think about it, the basement darkroom where I spent my weekends developing/printing the photos was right above me). Before we get kicked off this thread, I’ll add that the basement also contained drawers and drawers of old wood type blocks…I wonder what ever happened to all that stuff.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6942 posts in 1581 days


#13 posted 10-17-2012 09:56 PM

Wow! Thanks @shipwright, that is a great first person account for something that follows Ben Franklin and American history. It is amazing what humans were able to do WITHOUT computers. Sometimes we STILL wonder how they did it. Very cool!

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

5010 posts in 1464 days


#14 posted 10-17-2012 10:01 PM

teejk and juniorjock,
I can tell you know your linotypes.
The one at your weekly teejk, was not a deluxe model. They all made type on the spot but it was, as noted, cast not cut. The mats I referred to are the little brass pieces that carried the impression of the letters to be cast. Each mat had its own slot in the magazine up above (interchangeable for font size) and when typed, they would fall into the chase where, when a line-o-type was assembled, lead would be poured against the indented letters in the mats. Once the “slug” was made, the mats were raised back up above the magazine and would be dropped percisely back into the right slot there.

It was the unique pattern of little steps in the vee notch at the top of each mat that allowed it to fall off the rail only at its own slot. I’m thinking this saw may have been used to machine those little steps.

Wasn’t I an observant little bugger.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View juniorjock's profile

juniorjock

1930 posts in 2432 days


#15 posted 10-18-2012 12:12 AM

Not bad, Paul M. I could see that machine running in my mind while reading your post. I got pretty good at using the linotype, but my Dad was an expert. I never remember a time that something didn’t go wrong on the machine when it was being used. Dad could fix the problem in about five minutes. It would take me hours. When Dad passed away, the funeral home asked me if I wanted them to use another printer for the cards for his funeral. I said “hell no”, I’ll do them. There were only five or six lines of type that had to be set for one of those cards, the other type stayed the same. It took me seven hours to get that card done.

After looking at that saw again, it looks almost exactly like what we had. It is basically a sliding table saw, for lead. We had two lineotypes. On one, the columns of type was about two inches, but it cast the lead in a slug about four inches long. So we had to trim off the excess. That drawer on the bottom is where the cut-offs and the lead “chips” ended up. When it came time, we’d add that to the rest of the lead to be melted down again to cast “pigs”..... I could go on forever. Things were simple back then . . . . very simple.

teejk, you’re right, didn’t mean to hi-jack the thread. Just hard to stop when you get going. We had one hand fed Chandler and Price press and another (larger) that had a feeder on it. We had the big one on concrete but the smaller one was on the wooden floor (above the basement) – - – - where I built the darkroom. Now, ain’t that something.

Now, I’ll be quiet for a while. Sorry, ohtimberwolf.

showing 1 through 15 of 17 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase