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Upper Wheel Shaft Loose on Delta 14" Bandsaw

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Forum topic by Chris208 posted 652 days ago 1770 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Chris208

168 posts in 874 days


652 days ago

Hello LJs

I bought a 14” Delta Bandsaw that I am currently reconditioning. I noticed that the upper wheel shaft is loose where it meets the hinge in the tracking mechanism. How do I fix this? I included a picture of the offending part.


15 replies so far

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3055 posts in 1279 days


#1 posted 652 days ago

Chris, I see the part and the red arrows. Is the movement below the shoulder or washer I see? I don’t own a saw like this and have never worked on one of these. Is there a bearing in that casting? Is that where the movement comes from? I need a little more information on this. Maybe I can help

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Chris208

168 posts in 874 days


#2 posted 652 days ago

Thanks for your reply.

Yes, it’s loose under the washer, where the shaft inserts into the hinge. I have a HF 14” too, and its not loose on that, but I don’t know how to tighten it up.

No bearing in the casting. The bearings are in the wheel.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

1157 posts in 901 days


#3 posted 652 days ago

What’s under the washer? Is the casting that the shaft fits in to deformed like an oval? If so it sounds like you need a new casting or a way to keep the shaft from moving, maybe some JBWeld packed around it.

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Chris208

168 posts in 874 days


#4 posted 652 days ago

Under the washer is the hole into that the shaft inserts. Thehole goes all the way through to the underside of the hinge.

I’ll check for elongation when I get home.

If I use JB Weld, will it ever come apart again, say if I need to replace the shaft in the future?

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Grandpa

3055 posts in 1279 days


#5 posted 652 days ago

Well, the options are limited. You could ream the hole to a standard bushing size and then ream the bushing to fit the shaft. A machine shop could give you the best counsel on this method.

You could use JB WELD but that is going to be difficult to get in place and like you said it will be impossible to take apart.
I believe it is Loctite company that makes a product for putting into this type part. I do remember using it once chen I worked for a large pumping company. We had a spline that was not tight and knew it would break with the slop in it. We put this product in it and let it sit overnight. No problems. We pumped to 20,000 psi with a plunger type pump. It never cam back. I am not sure what is involved in removing the flange from the spline so you do need to check that. I think you can apply mild heat with a small torch and it comes apart. Maybe not. Let us know how this plays out.

Use a micrometer and measur ethe shaft and the bore for roundness. You might need to get a new part. That might be the cheaper option. Then again the new parts might all have slop in them.

View lew's profile

lew

9954 posts in 2359 days


#6 posted 652 days ago

On my band saw the casting (called a “Frog”) cracked. The replacement part did not have the shaft included. The original shaft was pinned in place with a rolled spring pin. Maybe you could use a similar method to secure your shaft.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

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Grandpa

3055 posts in 1279 days


#7 posted 652 days ago

I have been thinking about this. What does this hurt? It has some movement when all the tension is off the blade. When the balde is tight and the wheel is aligned it should be okay. Granted the shaft is pulled to one side of the bore but it doesn’t turn in that part. It could be a square peg in a round hole and not hurt anything…..the way I see it. Am I missing something in this thinking?

View Chris208's profile

Chris208

168 posts in 874 days


#8 posted 652 days ago

I disassembled the whole thing. The shaft has a V notch that the hinge pin slides through. I cleaned it and put it back together, but it’s still loose.

Maybe this won’t cause any problems once the blade is tensioned, but I’d love to know if anyone has had this same problem and can say how they fixed it, or if it is the way it is.

The saw is a 1992 delta 28-302 14 inch.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

463 posts in 803 days


#9 posted 652 days ago

It is supposed to be loose and will be loose as long as you don’t have the wheel tightened.. the shaft is held in place by the pin that goes through the back of the hinge and engaged in the v-groove. When you tighten up the nut holding the wheel on the shaft, it pulls it against the pin and tightens things up. Completely normal and as designed.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Fred Crooks's profile

Fred Crooks

11 posts in 299 days


#10 posted 297 days ago

I am new to this forum and just found this thread so sorry for the late entry into this.

I just posted a similar question. I am also reconditioning a Delta 14 inch band saw. But it is a much older one. Fortunately, they have not changed that much (especially for the part you are talking about).

My upper spindle is loose in the hinge as well. When I tighten the wheel on the spindle, that side-to-side play IS taken out. However, it does hit the back cover at around the 7 to 8 o-clock area.

When I got the machine, the spindle was tight in the hinge due to some rust build-up. Once I removed it to clean and inspect the part, it was not tight again.

I think prior to taking it apart that the rust just filled in the bore of the hinge as it aged and became worn. As tight as the rest of the machine is (in terms is the parts fitting together), I can’t believe Delta would have made or engineered that much play into that component.

I am in search of a new upper hinge casting and spindle. The SAWCENTER in MA may be able to get them. I am waiting to call them around noon today.

Will keep you posted as to my progress.

-- Best Regards

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

1015 posts in 1050 days


#11 posted 296 days ago

I would drill and tap the hinge and use a 10/32 set screw to keep the shaft from turning ,it would work better if you could drill a dimple on the shaft so the tip of the set screw would fit in it,I know it sounds like a complicated task but anyone with a drill and a tap & die set can do it.

-- Ken from Ontario

View Fred Crooks's profile

Fred Crooks

11 posts in 299 days


#12 posted 296 days ago

Excellent suggestion Ken. I went back out to look at it from that perspective. It appears that the hole in the hinge has been just too worn. As such I would be afraid that a set screw, while preventing any movement in the hinge, may actually push the shaft out of a true perpendicular orientation.

As I write, I just got confirmation from MikesTools.com that they have both items in stock (brand new). The hinge is $21 and the shaft is $18. I hope it is not made/cast in China because their manufacturing quality just does not stack up to American, Japanese, or German standards (at least that is what I have observed in their bearings)

Best Regards
Fred

-- Best Regards

View Chris208's profile

Chris208

168 posts in 874 days


#13 posted 296 days ago

I ended up not worrying about this too much. I stuck some paper shims in where the shaft goes into the hinge to take up some of the slop, and called it good.

My saw has been running like a champ for the last 6 months or so. A really great saw.

View Fred Crooks's profile

Fred Crooks

11 posts in 299 days


#14 posted 296 days ago

That’s great the paper shims worked. I really liked the saw when I viewed it on Craigslist. It was a bit rough from the years of neglect and poor maintenance. I expect it to perform very well for my projects also.

It came with a 1/2 HP Delta repulsion induction motor. Since that motor has open ends for air flow and there was an old mouse nest in it, I am thinking of purchasing a new 1 HP totally enclosed motor (to keep chips and other things out of it).

The question I have relates to optimal RPM speed of the band saw wheels. I have read that 600 RPM is best but I am not sure if that is correct and/or why. The argument was the faster the RPM the greater chance of wearing out the saw blade.

If 600 is optimal, then I need to size the motor RPM and the drive and driven pulley accordingly. My dilemma is in the pulley diameter selection seems to be in 1/2 inch increments. For example, if I use a 3” drive pulley with an 8” driven pulley, I will need a motor that runs at 1600 RPM. Single phase, 115 volt, AC motors seem to come in 1725 (what my Delta motor is) or 3460. There are a few other RPMs but not 1600.

So, assuming I can only find pulleys in 1/2” increments, how far above or below the driven RPM of 600 can I go?

-- Best Regards

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

1015 posts in 1050 days


#15 posted 295 days ago

Here’s a couple of links that might help:
http://vintagemachinery.org/math/sfpm.aspx
http://www.carbideprocessors.com/pages/saw-blades/band-saw-calculator.html

(Motor RPM) x (motor pulley diameter) / (bandsaw pulley diameter) x (bandsaw wheel diameter) x 3.1416 / 12 = SFPM

-- Ken from Ontario

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