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Forum topic by Laythen posted 645 days ago 1070 views 1 time favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Laythen

4 posts in 649 days


645 days ago

Hey All,

I had the great pleasure of acquiring a Delta Milwaukee 8” table saw (model 34-500) from a good friend. Unfortunately, it did not come with blade or belt gaurd. Does anyone have or know of someone who has a blade and/or belt gaurd for this saw? I looked up the numbers on the owwm site and here’s what I came up with: the blade gaurd(s): #34-967, or #34-966 and the belt gaurd #34-965. Thanks for your help!


15 replies so far

View ajosephg's profile

ajosephg

1839 posts in 2157 days


#1 posted 645 days ago

Welcome to Lumberjocks!!

I think you will find that the majority of the lumberjocks do not use a blade or belt guard on their saws.

1. The belt on contractor type saws is behind the saw and well away from the operator.

2. The guard (if available) is user unfriendly and in my opinion is more dangerous than not using it.

The key to safe usage include keeping your hands/fingers well away from a moving blade and make sure that they can’t be drawn into the blade. For example if you are pushing a board and the board departs the scene, will your hands be pulled or pushed into the blade? If you are ripping a board that requires the distance between the blade and the fence to be less than the width of your hand use a push stick. Even if my hand will fit between the blade and fence I’ll hook a couple of fingers over the fence to make sure I maintain a safe distance.

These are by no means all the things you need to be aware of. I’d suggest getting a good book on the care and feeding of table saws. I don’t have a good one in mind off hand, but I’m sure there may be some recommendations coming from other LJ’s.

I’ve been using power tools for more years than I want to admit to, and still have all my fingers, and have never had a cut from a power tool that was running. (Had minor cuts from tools that were not running!.)

-- Joe

View AlbertaJim's profile

AlbertaJim

47 posts in 1025 days


#2 posted 645 days ago

With all due respect I disagree with Joe. I too have been using a table saw for many years. It came used with out all the guards but I purchased them and used them. IMO they HELP keep fingers out of the way when we are distracted. On some cuts they are in the way but for most they are a help. There is no substitute for common sense when one is around a sharp blade that is spinning at around 5000 rpm.
That being said I bought a SawStop this spring and still use the guards as a reminder and help.

-- My Boss was a carpenter

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a1Jim

111999 posts in 2173 days


#3 posted 645 days ago

I have owned my saw for close to 18 years and in some cases found guards to be more harmful than helpful. As a woodworking instructor I always tell my students to error on the side of safety and to buy a Saw Stop if it’s in their budget , as a professional woodworker I could not stand having a guard on my table saw.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Laythen's profile

Laythen

4 posts in 649 days


#4 posted 645 days ago

Thanks for your time, guys. I agree the saw stop is the way to go. I think it will take a while to get that one ok’d by the finance dept. (my wife)... since the table saw that was given to me was free. What prompted my search in the first place were the testimonial videos on the sawstop website. I am more interested in the splitter function of the gaurd and haven’t figured out how to make my own gaurd and splitter.

View CessnaPilotBarry's profile

CessnaPilotBarry

877 posts in 706 days


#5 posted 645 days ago

Check out an overarm guard…

PSI, Exactor, and Excalibur, all make examples.

I found my Excalibur so useful in the 10 years I used it on my General 650, I kept it and installed it on my new SawStop.

A good overarm guard does not rely on the splitter for attachment to the saw, so it works with sleds and other non-through cuts. My Excalibur swings out of the way, or comes completely off the saw, without tools, so there’s no incentive not to replace it after the rare operations when it’s in the way.

-- It's all good, if it's wood...

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

1465 posts in 830 days


#6 posted 640 days ago

I’m not against the saw stop technology. I really don’t appreciate the way the inventor chose not to compete in the marketplace at first and moved directly and forcefully to cause new regulations to create his market for him. There are so many other ways to get hurt on a saw that the contact technology does not protect. In all my years none of the saw injuries I took care of were blade contact injuries. A riving knife is your most important guard. An over blade cover is nice, but a nuisance as often as not. (As Cessna points out, the Excalibur version is the most likely to stay useful.) Unfortunately on this saw, they are integral and not too functional. I’m going to post a picture of one on my blog.

Just be very careful and make SURE your alignments are accurate and stay that way. That will help the most in this case. Keep your blade exposure minimal for each cut. Examine the wood going in and know what it will do when cut. Pay special attention to the direction your hands are applying pressure so that a slip will not introduce them to the blade. Another time to pay special attention is when withdrawing the wood for a second pass. A sharp, clean blade is essential. The blade you bought to use is a good one because it has a safety feature built in…the depth of cut for each tooth is limited by the “knobs” between the teeth. That helps regulate the speed of infeed as well as limiting the traction the teeth can get should a board fall on the spinning blade.

I use tilting outfeed “plates”, not rollers or balls. Rollers and balls can steer the wood off the line of cut causing binding. My slippery, slightly pivoting plates are 12×12 inches square and replace the roller on a stand. The leading edge droops below the table level so as the outfeed sags the plate will “scoop” it up. As the outfeed reaches the pivot point the plate swivels level with the table and remains so, supporting the finished cut securely. I recommend the pivoting non-directional support especially when you have limited space and no guards.

Always use a push stick ripping narrow stock.
Dan

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2938 posts in 883 days


#7 posted 640 days ago

I’m with Jim, TS blade guards get in the way more than anything else.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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RussellAP

2938 posts in 883 days


#8 posted 640 days ago

I’ve also found that most of the injuries I’ve had while using my TS are from bumping my head after bending down to pick up something I dropped or to clean out some dust. Ouch.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View Don W's profile (online now)

Don W

14597 posts in 1164 days


#9 posted 640 days ago

I’ve bought and sold several TS over the years. Every one I’ve sold has gone with the guard still in the package it came in. In many cases these saws were used and the guard still came in the package it shipped in.

We all work different. Work how you feel safe.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View EEngineer's profile

EEngineer

885 posts in 2209 days


#10 posted 640 days ago

Finger saver needed

It is right between your ears.

-- "Find out what you cannot do and then go do it!"

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

1465 posts in 830 days


#11 posted 640 days ago

In my lengthy rant above, the edited sentence “I’m going to post some pictures on my blog” was attached to the wrong paragraph. The pictures are of the tilting outfeed supports I use now.
http://kragerwoodworking.weebly.com/1/post/2012/10/good-out-feed-support-contributes-to-safety.html
Dan

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

111999 posts in 2173 days


#12 posted 640 days ago

Dan
I know there are good number of folks that feel the same way you do about the inventor of the Saw Stop but no matter how you feel about it’s inventor the technology is well worth having an can save a major injury. As to your comment about there being many ways to injury yourself other than blade contact on a table saw ,I think is a stretch. The other major potential problem for injured is from kick back which can happen on any table saw. I feel your primer on table saw safety and their use is very good, but just because you have years of using a table saw without a injury due to blade contact does not mean that others will be as careful or as fortunate. I have shook hands with many woodworkers who have had one or more fingers missing due to just one second of distraction while using a table saw. I don’t own a Saw Stop nor do I have any affiliation with the Saw Stop company but I have used their saws and have seen their technology save a hand injury, in addition there saws are a high quality machines. Trying to discourage people from buying Saw Stops is tantamount to having folks buy older cars without seat belts or airbags because they were mandated by law. If folks are in the market for a new saw why not buy a quality safer saw that cost the same or less than other good cabinet saws. This is not meant to be a personal attack on you just a difference of opinion that I thought was important to point out to people with less experience .

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Loren's profile

Loren

7223 posts in 2244 days


#13 posted 640 days ago

I usually use a blade guard. I don’t find it impedes my work at all,
though I don’t like anti-kickback pawls.

You might want to see if you can find a second-hand “Brett Guard” –
it’s a well thought-out product.

Parts to these old saws are available on ebay, but are not always
affordable in relation to the resale value of the machine.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

1465 posts in 830 days


#14 posted 640 days ago

You are right, A1Jim, about kickback being a major problem. It occurs on ALL tablesaws, cheap and well made. It was kickback caused the major life threatening injuries I had to deal with on two memorable occasions in two different shops. Both were experienced operators that weren’t concentrating for a brief moment. More than one near miss involved boards dropped on a spinning blade. An out of control jig cobbled up a friends hand. An improperly adjusted power feeder, normally as safe as it gets near a saw, caused a spear to be embedded deeply in a brick wall. And on and on ad nauseum.

By the grace of God and a good head I have all my stuff and may you all keep yours!

Loren got us back on track. Over and out!

Dan

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com

View CessnaPilotBarry's profile

CessnaPilotBarry

877 posts in 706 days


#15 posted 640 days ago

Anti-kickback pawls are lame… Some even go so far as to damage softer stock and plywoods.

Has anyone noticed that proper riving knives don’t need anti-kickback pawls?

As a Bill Engval sez’... “Here’s your sign…” If your guard needs them, keep looking.

-- It's all good, if it's wood...

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