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Forum topic by bluekingfisher posted 651 days ago 1223 views 0 times favorited 28 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bluekingfisher

989 posts in 1576 days


651 days ago

I know there are a lot of hand plane fans out there so I am hoping one of you guys can help with identification of a hand plane I have lying in my tool chest.

I was watching a Rob Cosman video on hand planes the other evening and got me wondering about the hand planes I have but rarely use.

I was going to try to tune up a little Stanley Bailey No4 plane I have, I think I bought it at a flea market about 15 years ago, anyways I was hoping someone could give me some details on it’s age etc and if it is worth keeping or is it just one from a batch of 10 billion made yestertear.

The markings on the bed at the base of the rear tote read like this

PAT – 0
MAR – 25 – 02
AUG – 19 – 02
APR – 19 – 10

On the chip breaker it is stamped, New Britain, Conn, USA

Any info would be appreciated.

David

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan


28 replies so far

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9573 posts in 1215 days


#1 posted 651 days ago

It’s a piece of total detrious, better send it to me for safe disposal.
.
Oh, well, maybe not.
.
It’s a great tool. Don’t have the type studies in front of me, but I’m going to guess it has what’s called a low knob and a plain lever cap. That’d make it a Type 11, but it could be a Type 12. Between the wars, late 19-teens. A common smoother, really, but an excellent user.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

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bluekingfisher

989 posts in 1576 days


#2 posted 651 days ago

Thanks Smitty, its in pretty good condition although the reat tote has been re glued at some point. If I were to keep it is it worth buying a replacement and thicker blade or just use it as it is.

Had I known I should have taken a couple of photographs. If you would think it worthy I’ll take some photos of it tomorrow for you to see??

Yes it has a stubby low front tote and the lever cap is smooth (no brand name or anything stamped on it)

Anyways thanks for your info.

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan

View Don W's profile

Don W

14606 posts in 1164 days


#3 posted 650 days ago

With 3 patent dates behind the frog, Smitty’s right, its most likely a type 11 or 12. An 11 will have a low front knob and a small brass iron adjustment knob (about 1”). A 12 will have a high knob and a larger brass iron adjustment knob ( about 1 1/4”).

Both should have the frog adjustment screw.

Its definitely worth putting to use. These are some of my favorite vintages. We’d love to see some pictures.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

9573 posts in 1215 days


#4 posted 650 days ago

It can very effectively be used with the original iron! It’s maybe a $35 tool, depending on condition, street prices may vary. But you made a solid purchase those years ago! Pictures welcome, as Don said.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

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Don W

14606 posts in 1164 days


#5 posted 650 days ago

sorry, forgot to mention the original iron. Ditto on what Smitty said.

Depending on condition $35 is in the middle of the price range.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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bluekingfisher

989 posts in 1576 days


#6 posted 650 days ago

Thanks for the info gents, I guess it must be the type 11 then, it has a low front tote and the adjuster is an inch.

I guess at $35 its worth holding onto and putting to use. I bought it for £0.50 so on that reckoning I’m in the money.

Thanks again

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan

View Don W's profile

Don W

14606 posts in 1164 days


#7 posted 650 days ago

This is one spot Smitty and I disagree. Type 11 is on of my favorites. I’m working on a complete set, including all smooth and corrugated. Smitty’s more of a high knob SW guy. That Bailey will sere you well.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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bluekingfisher

989 posts in 1576 days


#8 posted 650 days ago

Thanks Don, it is a nice little plane, I had not realised that it was so old, maybe because I am no expert on hand planes and they all look the same to me although having cleaned it up a little and viewed your blog on renovations I can see how collecting planes can become addictive.

I have already printed off a template of the rear handle from Lee Valley tools as per identified on your blog I won’t replace the handle on the bailey but I have several other planes which could do with some customisation.

Thanks again for the hints and tips on how to go about fettling and fitting the totes and handles.

David

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan

View Arminius's profile

Arminius

304 posts in 2400 days


#9 posted 650 days ago

Agree with DonW – the Type 11 might well be the best user type Stanley ever made, barring the Bedrock types. Tuned and fitted with a modern iron they can perform with the best.

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bluekingfisher

989 posts in 1576 days


#10 posted 650 days ago

Thanks Arminus, further reassurance and satisfaction of my flea market find.

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan

View racerglen's profile

racerglen

2254 posts in 1377 days


#11 posted 650 days ago

“I bought it for £0.50 so on that reckoning I’m in the money.”
Yes you are !

-- Glen, Vernon B.C. Canada

View bluekingfisher's profile

bluekingfisher

989 posts in 1576 days


#12 posted 650 days ago

For those you showed an interest and gave some valuable information I have added some photos for you to see the little Bailey plane.

BTW how do I go about setting the blade for a light cut? Do I adjust the frog first then the iron or the iron first then the blade which ever way I try to do it I either cut a thick slice or I clog the mouth.

Anywat here it is.

Thanks gents

.

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9573 posts in 1215 days


#13 posted 650 days ago

Blue – That’s a nice plane!

RE: Fettling. The abbreviated version is something like this: Set the frog ‘depth’ so that the angled face of the frog matches the bevel of the mouth. Not back, not forward. The same. For now…

Set the chipbreaker to the iron with a 1/16” of the iron revealed from the cutting edge. Place it in against the frog, snap the lever cap in place (shouldn’t be too easy or too hard. If either, turn the capscrew a quarter turn at a time until it’s right)

Draw the iron back until it doesn’t cut. Then spin the adjuster a bit at a time until it does cut just a bit. It’ll be off-center. Use the lateral adjust to get it right. Sight down the bed of the plane whilst it’s upside down, knob end towards your face, like you’d check for crown in a board. You should see the iron peeking out. Use the adjuster to get it even, and better yet a piece of scrap run back and forth across the cutting edge to see there’s (barely) uniform contact.

Try a cut now…

Repeat as often as needed to get it where you want it.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

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Don W

14606 posts in 1164 days


#14 posted 650 days ago

Here is what I do. First I set the frog so its as even as I can get it to the back side of the mouth.

I then put everything back together and drop the blade until I can just barely see it when I sight down the sole.
I just laterally if needed, and it usually does.
I then set it on the wood and slide the plane forward. If the iron grabs, back the blade off.
Then in very small increments I lower the blade and test by moving forward.
You may find you’ll get thin shavings from one side to the other. If that happens, move the lat adjuster toward the shavings, just a little.
Test again and lower again, in very small increments.

At some points, you’ll need to check and see how wide the mouth is. Once you start taking thin shaving, if the mouth is to wide, move the frog forward, if its closed up tight, move the frog backward, and start the above again.

It sounds like a lengthy process, but once the frog is set its set. And the rest once you’ve done it a few times only takes a few seconds.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Don W's profile

Don W

14606 posts in 1164 days


#15 posted 650 days ago

I see, as usual, Smitty snuck in ahead of me!

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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