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Forum topic by Surfside posted 10-10-2012 03:00 PM 696 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Surfside

3361 posts in 917 days


10-10-2012 03:00 PM

Found this shared on linked.com:

Blade manufacturing processes:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=huHXmrHcg4A&feature=share&list=ULhuHXmrHcg4A

So, this is how their blades are welded?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2t0OqSp1LVQ&feature=share&list=UL2t0OqSp1LVQ

-- "someone has to be wounded for others to be saved, someone has to sacrifice for others to feel happiness, someone has to die so others could live"


9 replies so far

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Tennessee

1555 posts in 1258 days


#1 posted 10-10-2012 04:52 PM

On the welding, that’s about it, and most good maintenance shops have a good blade welder to fix broken blades. Trick is in the anealing. Most anybody can get the two pieces to weld together with these machines, the real trick is in making the weld the same hardness as the rest of the blade. Then you have to grind down the weld so it is the same thickness as the blade proper.

The general old school test for checking a new or repaired bandsaw blade is to take the freshly welded, annealed and ground blade, throw it up in the air like a barrel hoop, and let it hit the ground, springing back up. If the weld holds, good to go.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

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Surfside

3361 posts in 917 days


#2 posted 10-10-2012 06:07 PM

That’s a scary old school test! And the teeth should face upwards?

-- "someone has to be wounded for others to be saved, someone has to sacrifice for others to feel happiness, someone has to die so others could live"

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GrandpaLen

1586 posts in 1016 days


#3 posted 10-10-2012 06:09 PM

Interesting Videos, thanks for sharing.

Work Safely and have Fun. – Grandpa Len.

-- Mother Nature should be proud of what you've done with her tree. - Len ...just north of a stone's throw from the oHIo, river that is, in So. Indiana.

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DougRog

12 posts in 798 days


#4 posted 10-10-2012 06:35 PM

Good to see how the pros weld the blade, but remember you can do it too, that is you can repair broken band saw blades in your shop. I haven’t done it in a long time, but I remember using silver solder, which you can melt just with an ordinary propane torch. I use to have a small jig that lined up the two ends of the broken blade and would weld like that.

I also built a bandsaw blade sharpening jig that I saw in an old issue of Fine Woodworking, and the blades would sharpen as good as new. I’m mentioning this so others can know there are things we can so ourselves without having to run to the pros.

-- The Higest Art, the Highest Science, and the Highest Religion is the same thing.

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Surfside

3361 posts in 917 days


#5 posted 10-10-2012 06:44 PM

I think the better idea there is that we can do the things(welding) like how the pros do it. With the same quality of results compare to pros’ works. It’s a good lesson to ponder. BTW, welcome to the club, doug!

-- "someone has to be wounded for others to be saved, someone has to sacrifice for others to feel happiness, someone has to die so others could live"

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Tennessee

1555 posts in 1258 days


#6 posted 10-10-2012 06:52 PM

Surfside:
No, the teeth would be facing away from your hand as you rolled it up into the air. You want it to come down on a flat side, so the circle deflects, causing deflection on the weld to see if it is suitable to put in a bandsaw. People did this for decades and decades.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

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Surfside

3361 posts in 917 days


#7 posted 10-10-2012 07:09 PM

Tennessee:
By how far will you throw the blade up in the air? Will the force be enough to test the strength of the weld?

-- "someone has to be wounded for others to be saved, someone has to sacrifice for others to feel happiness, someone has to die so others could live"

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

1555 posts in 1258 days


#8 posted 10-10-2012 07:29 PM

I toss it up about as high as I stand, 6 feet. Toss it up totally uncoiled. It only has to be done once. Let it bounce till it comes to rest. If it has a bad weld, the deflection action will break the weld immediately. Most of the bad welds on bandsaws are because the annealing has been improper, or the weld did not cover the entire width of the blade. This exposes both. Been there, done that for years.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

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Surfside

3361 posts in 917 days


#9 posted 10-10-2012 07:58 PM

Have you tried throwing it lower than your height? I stand about 5’7”, and if I throw it as high as I stand, will the tossing test be reliable? And another thing, what is the modern method to test the quality of the weld?

-- "someone has to be wounded for others to be saved, someone has to sacrifice for others to feel happiness, someone has to die so others could live"

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