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Jet JWBS-14CS: 115 or 230 volt?

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Forum topic by WoodCop posted 10-08-2012 11:59 PM 1553 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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WoodCop

29 posts in 960 days


10-08-2012 11:59 PM

Topic tags/keywords: jet jwbs-14cs bandsaw bs 115 230

Hi all,

Just recently purchased the Jet JWBS-14CS and so far so good. Haven’t put it through its paces yet. I’m pretty new to woodworking and was wondering, what is the main difference in 115 or 230? My shop is set-up for either, so thats not the problem. Whats the pro’s and con’s of both? And does anyone have any good/bad experiences with this model BS? I purchased the Kreg fence system and was wondering if I should upgrade the guide blocks, add risers, etc…

Thanks for any feedback, it’s much appreciated.

-- “Things may come to those who wait...but only the things left by those who hustle.”


20 replies so far

View toolie's profile

toolie

1770 posts in 1348 days


#1 posted 10-09-2012 12:10 AM

some motors, according to shopnotes magazine, develop more power in 220v mode than 110v mode, but the motor’s data plate would confirm that. they are not, as i understabnd it, all that common. also according to shopnotes, in either 110v or 220v configuration, the motor consumes the same amount of power so wiring for 220v doesn’t use or save any power relative to 110v configured tools..

from personal experience, 220v seems to make more effective use of the available power. i’ll leave it to the more technically inclined to post the reason why. i can confirm that i power my entire shop (lights, shop vac, 110v power tools and 220v unisaw, DC and 18” band saw) on a 30A sub panel. never needed more power.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15003 posts in 2395 days


#2 posted 10-09-2012 05:29 AM

Any motor over 1 hp should be on 240 volts due to the excessive starting requirements. If you have a noticeable pause on start up using 120 volts, the motor should be wired for 240 volts.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Swyftfeet's profile

Swyftfeet

169 posts in 891 days


#3 posted 10-10-2012 12:00 AM

One way or the other your total wattage is the same, no difference in your electric bill. What does matter is the distance from the source, the gauge of wire you use to power your equipment, and the number of loads and their Amperage draw… 220 will generally use half the current of 110 since the power being used remains equal, (you’re using both “hots” vs 1), this allows you to save some bucks on wire gauge and power more machines with the same breaker. It’s best to have high draw 220 machines like a TS or an arc welder on their own circuits and it might even be mandated by local code.

-- Brian

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11678 posts in 2407 days


#4 posted 10-10-2012 12:57 AM

Often thought about switching mine to 220 volt , but only because it was an option. It operates perfectly on 110 , so I left it alone : )

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View JesseTutt's profile

JesseTutt

811 posts in 830 days


#5 posted 10-10-2012 03:11 PM

Power consumed (=$) will not change. Power = Voltage x Amperage. Switching between 110 and 220 volts will double the voltage and half the current.

Every time electricity passes through a wire there is a voltage drop due to the resistance of the wire. Voltage Drop = Amperage x Resistance. Switching between 110 and 220 will halve the current and therefore decrease the voltage drop. Additionally, 220 usually uses larger wire diameter (lower wire gauge) which decreases the resistance. Voltage Drop decreases the voltage that reaches the load (motor) which can cause decreased performance and if sufficient drop can damage the motor.

(Note: for simplicity I am using DC equations not the AC ones)

-- Jesse, Saint Louis, Missouri

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5558 posts in 2095 days


#6 posted 10-10-2012 03:52 PM

In theory, there’s supposedly no difference if the 110v circuit is up to par (many are not). In practice, I’ve definitely noted a difference in startup speed and recovery from bogging, which ultimately made the saw seem like it ran stronger. Every circuit and every motor are different, but 220v tends to have less voltage loss, which can show up most during peak demands. It’s possible that you won’t notice any difference, but you might. If you’ve got 220v and the motor can run on either, I’d run it on 220v. No harm done, and there’s reasonable possibility that you’ll see a difference.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View toolie's profile

toolie

1770 posts in 1348 days


#7 posted 10-10-2012 04:15 PM

jessetutt ….... Additionally, 220 usually uses larger wire diameter (lower wire gauge)

i thought 220v AC used a higher gauge wire of a smaller diameter then 110v to accommodate a given size tool. my 3hp unisaw needs 8/2 wire and a 40A breaker 110v (it draws 32A) and 12/2 wire and a 20A breaker 220v (it draws 16A). or am i missing something?

knotscott ….... +1 re: tool performance on 220v. previous to the addition of a a few 220v tools to my shop, all my tools were 110v. now that i’ve adapted the shop to 220v tools in addition to the 110v tools, the overhead lights dim much less when starting up the 220v tools.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View WoodCop's profile

WoodCop

29 posts in 960 days


#8 posted 10-10-2012 06:17 PM

I have a brand new sub-panel in my shop. I have 3-220v lines that are dedicated to whatever I needed them for. I haven’t seen the lights dim when I use my BS or Jointer. I have to install my DC system. All 3 of my Jet products, DC, BS and Jointer can be converted to 220v. Im not that electrically inclined and are somewhat nervous about doing the wiring conversion myself. Would a licensed electrician do something like this or too small a job? I just think I am wasting the machines potential by NOT converting. Is this true?

-- “Things may come to those who wait...but only the things left by those who hustle.”

View Jake7212's profile

Jake7212

27 posts in 1377 days


#9 posted 10-10-2012 06:37 PM

WoodCop, I would have to say that no job is too big or too small for an electrician especially if you are unsure of what you’re doing. I’d rathr spend a few extra dollars and have it done right, than risk electrocution, fire or any other disaster. If something bad does happen, and you have done it yourself, that just gives any insurance company an excuse to not cover loss of property or loss of life. On the other hand, there are many knowledgable people on this website who are always willing to give advice, lend a hand in any way shape or form. In the opinion of this Marine, if it aint broke, dont fix it.

Jake

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5558 posts in 2095 days


#10 posted 10-10-2012 07:46 PM

Woodcap, if you’re talking about just rewiring the motor, it’s a piece of cake and is spelled out pretty clearly on a schematic inside the wire junction box on the motor…...5 minute job, honest! The entire process should be in the manual.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View toolie's profile

toolie

1770 posts in 1348 days


#11 posted 10-10-2012 09:31 PM

why not just call jet’s vaunted tech support line and have them talk you through it. seriously, as knotscott noted, it’s usually spelled out in the OM and generally involves changing the connection of 3 wires. if you aren’t intimidated by wire nuts, it should be a piece of cake.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5558 posts in 2095 days


#12 posted 10-10-2012 10:24 PM

My humble apologies to WoodCop for misspelling his username in post #10. It’s too late to edit.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15003 posts in 2395 days


#13 posted 10-10-2012 10:56 PM

WoodCop I’ve been doing this for nearly 45 years. If you have a noticeable pause on start up using 120 volts it is hard on your motor and should be converted to 240 volts. If not, do not worry about.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11678 posts in 2407 days


#14 posted 10-10-2012 11:48 PM

Hi TMax , the BS comes standard with only 1hp motor….mine starts and runs fine on 110v : )

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15003 posts in 2395 days


#15 posted 10-11-2012 12:52 AM

That is about the line. Over 1, usually at 1 1/2 hp, it is best to go 240.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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