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Forum topic by wood_warrior posted 10-07-2012 05:17 AM 2099 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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wood_warrior

15 posts in 714 days


10-07-2012 05:17 AM

Topic tags/keywords: saw power tool vintage

I got this cool vintage saw at a garage sale for free. I opened it up to see what I was working with and I found a lot of grime. Where do I get started. I’ve never restored a motor before. Should I use a solvent of some kind to clean up the copper?


19 replies so far

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Bill White

3447 posts in 2612 days


#1 posted 10-07-2012 02:50 PM

First thing ya need to do is blow/brush all the crud out of the motor, check the brushes and armature for nasty deposits (clean ‘em if needed), and check the bearings for any needed lube.
I have not used any solvents when cleaning an elec. motor.
You might find that this is all ya need.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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wood_warrior

15 posts in 714 days


#2 posted 10-07-2012 03:39 PM

Brushes look good, what is armature

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Bill White

3447 posts in 2612 days


#3 posted 10-07-2012 04:24 PM

It is the part that the brushes contact. Usually segmented copper “drum” shape.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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wood_warrior

15 posts in 714 days


#4 posted 10-07-2012 08:03 PM

Thanks bill. Yeah that part looks like crap. How should I go about cleaning it?

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Grandpa

3129 posts in 1327 days


#5 posted 10-08-2012 03:40 AM

IT looks like the bearing has been worn to the end of its life. Replace it. Cost is about $3 or $4. While it is off see if you can go to a generator or alternator shop. The generators are msade exactly like this. they can take a skim cut off the commutator and make it perfectly round on their metal lathe. Reassemble. Should be fine.

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wood_warrior

15 posts in 714 days


#6 posted 10-10-2012 04:28 AM

I guess im confused which part is commutator and which is armature?

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dhazelton

1185 posts in 948 days


#7 posted 10-10-2012 01:52 PM

What you see looks perfectly normal for an older motor. Just blow everything off, replace the bearings if they feel notchy (most likely need to buy a cheap gear pull set at Harbor Freight and the drive them back on with a piece of pvc pipe that is same diameter as inner race), clean the switch with some electrical contact cleaner (Radio Shack or CRC brand from an auto parts store) add new grounded cord (green to any metal part of the housing) and give her a go.

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Bill White

3447 posts in 2612 days


#8 posted 10-10-2012 02:06 PM

I was not clear. The commutator is the segmented copper ring on which the brushes seat. It is part of the armature which is the whole assembly in your pic that spins. Grandpa’s suggestion about getting the commutator resurfaced is a good tip.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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Surfside

3135 posts in 825 days


#9 posted 10-10-2012 02:40 PM

Prepare an electrolysis solution! Get rid of the rusts!!!!

-- "someone has to be wounded for others to be saved, someone has to sacrifice for others to feel happiness, someone has to die so others could live"

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dhazelton

1185 posts in 948 days


#10 posted 10-10-2012 07:28 PM

You don’t need bright and shiny in a motor winding – you need repulsion and that will happen just fine. Don’t soak it or bead blast it or have it turned on a lathe. The brushes are spring loaded so they will make contact. Just get rid of the saw dust, refresh the bearings and put it back together!

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

1447 posts in 1166 days


#11 posted 10-10-2012 07:35 PM

dhazelton is right, but I rewound motors while in the Navy, and we proved over and over that you do need to clean the commutator. A nice, shiny copper surface will conduct better, and draw lower amperage as the motor spins. You might also think of looking inbetween the commutator segments, to clean out any built up carbon, which will short out individual coils, causing the motor to run with even more amperage and cause possible sparking. A wooden wedge makes a great cleaner inbetween segments, and won’t tear out the insulation. In your dusty environment, you don’t need sparks from the brushes helping wood dust ignite.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

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dhazelton

1185 posts in 948 days


#12 posted 10-10-2012 08:52 PM

I took a 1930’s motor to a shop to size bearings and asked about the commutator and the varnish-like coating that was sometimes put on the windings. They said they don’t touch anything that stuff, but then again, if their job is just to get a motor running again they probably don’t care much about tuning it up perfectly. I would just caution that unless the saw is rare or has sentimental value that one doesn’t spend a fortune on machine work. And PLEASE make sure you ground it.

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wood_warrior

15 posts in 714 days


#13 posted 10-11-2012 03:27 AM

Yeah I noticed that it doesn’t have a ground. I’m replacing the wiring since it is completely falling apart. I can’t figure out how to get to the wiring in the handle without tearing up the switch. The switch seems pretty brittle. I found a place to screw in the ground. Ill do that before I plug it in. I fully expect it to trip when I plug it in.

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wood_warrior

15 posts in 714 days


#14 posted 10-11-2012 03:28 AM

You guys are great. Its awesome to get ahold of all this experience.

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wood_warrior

15 posts in 714 days


#15 posted 10-11-2012 03:31 AM

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