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rabbeting bit for inset lids in keepsake boxes?

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Forum topic by Millo posted 694 days ago 1170 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Millo

543 posts in 1682 days


694 days ago

Is it safe (both for me and the workpiece) use a rabbeting bit on the router table to cut rabbets on the sides of an assembled box to set an inset lid? We’re talking small boxes put together with dovetails. Lids inset on all sides (like this one: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/60830 ), and not just on their sides with front and back hanging. These sides would be at least 3/8” thick, with the rabbet being at least 1/8” wide.

These lids would be hinged with pins or dowels, which brings me to another question: where do you get your brass pin stock? Is it generally better to use metal pins over wooden ones due to wood movement/friction?

Thanks!


7 replies so far

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

5550 posts in 2061 days


#1 posted 694 days ago

It’s easier and safer to cut dadoes on what will become the insides and outsides of the box. Cut almost 1/2 of the thickness on one side and, on the other side, make your dado cut 1/16” above or below the first cut and also nearly 1/2 of the box side thickness. The table saw cut to separate the lid will cut away the 1/16” web. Sand to a snug fit.
A caveat: This technique is easiest when using mitered corners. I’d need a lot of head scratching to make it work with dovetails or box joints. Also, using a pin type wooden hinge would best be accomplished using Shipwrights easy hinge technique. HINGE

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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Millo

543 posts in 1682 days


#2 posted 694 days ago

re: ones with mitered corners: OF COURSE! My original question was really regarding dovetailed boxes but then again I just wrote in mitered as well, which doesn’t make any sense since I can cut those grooves accurately before assembling the box. DUH! I’ll edit the original question.

Also I’ve seen, here and elsewhere, dovetailed boxes with separated lids. I’ve done 4 little boxes w/ mitered corners w keys and separated lids. I’m really ore looking into the whole inset-lid thing with dovetailed boxes, since I think I would prefer this type of lid with dovetail joints.

Thanks

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Gene Howe

5550 posts in 2061 days


#3 posted 694 days ago

I can fairly closely visualize your concept as I’m building a briefcase with box joints and brass pinned wood joints, ala Shipwright. The way I see it, the fit of the inside dadoed lid over a dadoed bottom would be limited to just the front and two sides. It gets too complicated for my pea brain to build the box with box joints or dovetails AND dadoed lid and case so that it could be cut apart and yet incorporate wooden hinges.
So, my plan is to build the case, cut it apart, cut 1.25” deep reliefs in the hinge side of both the top and bottom of the separated case and insert contrasting pieces that have been made into hinges like Shipwright’s. ( you can see that’s what he did on the MDF case in his blog that I referenced) All the while bearing in mind that the contrasting inserts need to be wide enough to allow for the pin hinge. I’m assuming 1/4” should be sufficient for the 1/8th pin.
I plan to cut and round over the hinge BEFORE gluing them in to the relief.
Finally, to register the lid and case, I’ll just add a thin strip inside the case. This case will be foam filled for a pistol, so my cheat won’t show. Besides, I’m in a bit over my head already!
I wish I could have been more help, Milo. If you come up with a plan, please share with me.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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Gene Howe

5550 posts in 2061 days


#4 posted 694 days ago

I just spoke with Paul (Shipwright) and after a couple emails, I think I may have another suggestion for you.
Why not go ahead and cut your inside/outside dadoes and cut it apart? Then, plan on separate pieces for your hinge, as I’m going to do. After all, the relief for the hinge leafs will cut away the dadoes in that area and the lid/case would still retain them on the other 3 sides and part of the back, either side of the hinge.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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Millo

543 posts in 1682 days


#5 posted 693 days ago

I see. Well, the idea was to simplify the process since my shop time is very limited (don’t have my own shop). I’ll check the blog you’re referring to, then ask the Lumberjock who postec the box I listed on top. I think I just noticed what his solution was. I also realized I have a plan here for a box with this kind of lid, although it has mitered boxes i does not have rabbets cut out to fir in the lid, so I can just see how they did it, which I assume is the same way Fireguy did it. Duh!

Thanks, Gene!

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kizerpea

746 posts in 1000 days


#6 posted 691 days ago

i have the freud rabbeting bit with bearing set..made in italy works good for me..32-524 #

-- IF YOUR NOT MAKING DUST...YOU ARE COLLECTING IT! SOUTH CAROLINA.

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Millo

543 posts in 1682 days


#7 posted 691 days ago

kizerpea, I’m wondering more about the technique than any set brand recommendation, etc. Thanks for your reply, though, I’ll keep it in mind.

On the whole topic of building a lid inside the sides, as opposed to one that would

I was thinking about taking more or less these steps:
1. [this step might be moved to step before adding the pull] cut a groove in which the pull from the lid will eventually go through to the front of the box
2. cut the joints, plus appropriate grooves for the bottom, glue box sides with bottom assembled
3. support the lid with scrap blocks cut to height so that the top would be flush, a bit lower or a bit higher (depending on what fit I want with that particular box) with the top edge of the box sides?
4. space it evenly with spacers to stabilize it, then drill through both sides to do the pin holes?
5. add the pull to the top, sized to the groove cut in the center of the front face?

What do you guys think?

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