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Forum topic by RussellAP posted 10-01-2012 06:51 PM 599 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RussellAP

2951 posts in 943 days


10-01-2012 06:51 PM

I’m starting to design some furniture out of some bend wood pieces. I’m using a lamination process instead of trying to bend solid pieces. The lamentation is usually about 1/8 of and inch or less. It’s really hard to get accurate slices so thin on a table saw mainly because the lumber is rough cut and not very exact. So I was wondering if using my band saw would be a better way to cut these slices? I could run them through the jointer and get a good flat start for the fence and as long as I don’t cut anything too long it should be easy to cut.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.


12 replies so far

View toolie's profile

toolie

1762 posts in 1285 days


#1 posted 10-01-2012 06:54 PM

what prevents making the pieces cut on the TS from 1/16 – 1/8” larger than finished size and squaring them with a jointer and thicknessing them with a planer?

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

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RussellAP

2951 posts in 943 days


#2 posted 10-01-2012 06:58 PM

Toolie. It’s complex. Most of the rough cut lumber I have is 15/16, give or take. If I were to cut 2 inch slices, I’d rip them in half and have two one inch slices after I bend them of course. They come out of the bender very straight so I don’t have to do much more than sand them down. I’m just wondering if the band saw would be a better choice or if it would get gnarly.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

655 posts in 966 days


#3 posted 10-01-2012 06:59 PM

Have you a drum or wide belt sander? If so rip over sized and finish with the sander.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1815 days


#4 posted 10-01-2012 07:07 PM

A good band saw is preferred simply because you are reducing waste. But from an accuracy standpoint, if your TS is anything like mine, it will be more accurate than the bandsaw. The roughness of the wood shouldn’t be an issue…I’d think you’d need a jointed side regardless.

If you are going to do laminations, a planer will not work well for really thin or figured stock. I’d buy or build a drum sander. I picked mine up that past weekend and I know it is merely the beginning of a long love affair. :)

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

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Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1815 days


#5 posted 10-01-2012 07:08 PM

Oh, and I’m far from a pro. :)

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2951 posts in 943 days


#6 posted 10-01-2012 07:11 PM

Cosmicsniper. I’ve been using a couple of ROS to finish them. It rounds the edges and smooths them out. Most of the wood is pretty much right on when I glue it up so not much of anything needs to be done.
Right now I have 5 strips of red oak and walnut mixed in the mold. I haven’t glued it up yet, just get it used to the shape first. I’ll post some photo’s later.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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patron

13034 posts in 1998 days


#7 posted 10-01-2012 07:12 PM

i have joined the edges of the board first
and rip them slightly over
joint next one
rip
joint next one
etc.
then on a sled of 3/4 board
with a stop across it (glued down)
run them thru the planer
or surface sander
or just do the same
flipping them over for both sides
the last pass your finished size

if using the planer for this
i watch the grain
so as not to rip it up
in the sander it doesn’t mater to much

easy does it

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View 404 - Not Found's profile

404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 1626 days


#8 posted 10-01-2012 09:40 PM

Unless you’ve got a really good bandsaw, I wouldn’t even consider trying to resaw a whole load of strips. It only takes the blade to wander a little and you’ll be cursing. It will waste just as much material as the table saw and leave you more work getting the faces good again.
A thin kerf blade in the TS would be my approach to this, true you’re taking out 2.2mm of a kerf, but you only need the barest of clean-ups to get a good glue surface.
When you are ripping these thin strips, get a good square edge on the jointer first, rip it, put your strip aside, joint the ripped face of the plank again, rip another strip off again, and carry on like that – this way you already have one good surface on the strip and you can feed them all through the planer one after the other when they are cut.
I have often bent laminations around a fairly tight radius – you need to go thinner with the material to do this and to help it you can do a quick steam bend by laying them all out flat, lay a wet towel on top and iron the area to be bent – you want to be able to hear the crack and spit of the iron and steam coming off the towel, then gather up your pieces, put them together and part bend them to the shape they are going to be.

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2951 posts in 943 days


#9 posted 10-01-2012 09:51 PM

Thanks Renners. I’m not doing any tight curves at the moment, but I usually soak them in hot water in the tub for an hour or so and they work like spaghetti.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View 404 - Not Found's profile

404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 1626 days


#10 posted 10-01-2012 09:53 PM

Try the iron trick Russell, it’s instant and the wood dries much more quickly.

View Woodendeavor's profile

Woodendeavor

216 posts in 1263 days


#11 posted 10-01-2012 10:11 PM

Russell I rip allot of 1/8” strips for for some of my products My secret for ripping lies in a good blade on the table saw and a good feather board. I can now measure my strips with a micrometer to plus or minus 1/128 of my desired size. and make sure the blade is clean, I can sand out saw marks with 220 after assembly

View Operaman's profile

Operaman

134 posts in 2503 days


#12 posted 10-01-2012 10:37 PM

I believe the key to doing bent lamination is having a good bandsaw that is properly set up and tuned and the proper blade. Cutting laminations from a sheer physics standpoint on a table saw is dangerous business, plus perfectly good material is being wasted hand over fist. If bent lamination work is something that you intend to do more of, then either setting up the bandsaw you have for fine work or buying one capable of doing fine work is a must. I would be happy to talk more about tune-up with you as it might pertain the to bandsaw you currently own.

As an aside I do as much work on my bandsaw as on my table saw, and perhaps more. I don’t know of any professional woodworkers, myself obviously included, who utilize a table saw to cut lamination strips for, mainly, the reasons I enumerated above.

-- Cheers!

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