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Save me from a foolish mistake with Canola Oil

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Forum topic by Murdock posted 09-28-2012 at 04:14 PM 1934 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Murdock

107 posts in 1121 days


09-28-2012 at 04:14 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question oil finishing oak

Due to a really stupid move on my part I spilled Canola oil on a nearly finished side table project made with Red Oak. Had it in the kitchen to show it off to some friends and was trying to cook with it sitting there.

I wiped off the bulk of the oil with paper towels, but of course some soaked into the surface.

What is this going to do to me when it comes time to finish? I am planning on using a golden oak watco oil for this project.

Will this ruin my finish? will it go rancid down the road? do I need to remove the affected pieces and start over? Really don’t want to have to do that.

-- "Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new." - Albert Einstein


20 replies so far

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HorizontalMike

6928 posts in 1551 days


#1 posted 09-28-2012 at 04:25 PM

Lacking in knowledge on the matter, I would probably coat the entire piece with canola oil, wipe off, let dry, and then continue with your original plan for finishing.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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Moron

4666 posts in 2530 days


#2 posted 09-28-2012 at 04:26 PM

acetone might help, albeit very explosive but it will dissipate the oil with multiple applications

Years ago I did the same thing, and the marks are still there today but I didnt use acetone/alcohol/naptha

You might be best to remove affected parts

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

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Dallas

2882 posts in 1124 days


#3 posted 09-28-2012 at 04:33 PM

Rape seed oil, (Canola), will go rancid over time, but if you wiped it up quickly and inundate the surface with mineral oil, then use your Watco finish it should be OK.

What will happen is that the mineral oil should mix with the Canola and dilute it to the point that it’s a non issue.

If not, you can use the old acetone trick to draw the oil out, but with red oak it will probably go on through to the bottom.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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HorizontalMike

6928 posts in 1551 days


#4 posted 09-28-2012 at 04:40 PM

What these folks are saying is that these solvents will dilute the canola oil, NOT remove it. That said, I would STILL recommend cover ALL, wiping it off, THEN try using the solvents. This way ALL of the project will at least be treated equally and you just MIGHT end up without streaks. NO guarantee, but what is there to lose at this point.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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Murdock

107 posts in 1121 days


#5 posted 09-28-2012 at 04:58 PM

Thanks for the suggestions guys

I am inclined to go the route of covering at least the top where the majority of the hit with canola is as HorizontalMike suggests then wipe off and then try the acetone

I guess if it goes bad then I can replace the parts, it is the top and some dripping on a side, I am thinking that the side won’t be too noticeable.

-- "Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new." - Albert Einstein

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crank49

3380 posts in 1608 days


#6 posted 09-28-2012 at 06:06 PM

You could seal it with dewaxed shellac, but I don’t know how that would affect your finishing plans.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

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Greg..the Cajun Box Sculptor

5032 posts in 1945 days


#7 posted 09-28-2012 at 06:11 PM

I also agree with covering the entire top with canola oil and blend in the stained part.
Canola oil is great for making a roux but never used it for a wood finish before.

-- If retiring is having the time to be able to do what you enjoy then I have always been retired.

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JJohnston

1577 posts in 1928 days


#8 posted 09-28-2012 at 06:20 PM

You might try “whiting” along with the acetone. It’s sold by gunsmith suppliers, buti t’s nothing but chalk dust. You mix it with the acetone to make a paste and slather it on. The acetone dissolves the oil and the absorbent quality of the chalk helps draw it out.

-- "Sorry I'm late. Somebody tampered with my brakes." "You should have been early, then."

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madts

1251 posts in 977 days


#9 posted 09-28-2012 at 06:32 PM

I will say any vegetable oil is oil. Just do NOT use engine or transmission oil!

-- Thor and Odin are still the greatest of Gods.

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Clint Searl

1433 posts in 998 days


#10 posted 09-28-2012 at 07:11 PM

The previous comments have no basis in chemistry or experience. All you need to do is scrub it well with a strong solution of dishwasher detergent and hot water, followed by a hot water rinse. Repeat. After it dries, proceed with your usual finishing schedule.

-- Clint Searl.............We deserve what we tolerate

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JJohnston

1577 posts in 1928 days


#11 posted 09-28-2012 at 07:19 PM

Well, no experience other than that I’ve used whiting & acetone to draw old cosmoline out of wooden rifle stocks, that is.

-- "Sorry I'm late. Somebody tampered with my brakes." "You should have been early, then."

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Deycart

381 posts in 895 days


#12 posted 09-29-2012 at 01:00 AM

After following everyone’s advise I would try to use some japan dryer on it to get the residual oil that you cant get out to harden. Just use a generous amount of it and do it outside!

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1433 posts in 998 days


#13 posted 09-29-2012 at 01:50 AM

JJohnston—-You’re wasting money on the acetone when mineral spirits or naptha will work better.

Deycart—-Japan drier will have no effect on an oil that does not polymerize.

-- Clint Searl.............We deserve what we tolerate

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Grandpa

3107 posts in 1312 days


#14 posted 09-29-2012 at 01:37 PM

I agree with H-Mike when he says the solvents will dilute the oil and allow it to go further into the wood. Anyone here ever remove an oil spot off wallpaper? Use talc and let it draw the oil out. I think I would try to dilute it with a solvent and then place the table (oily side down) onto some corn starch that is spread evenely on some newspaper. Let it sit for a day or two then vacuum the corn starch out of the pores of the wood.

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Moron

4666 posts in 2530 days


#15 posted 09-30-2012 at 06:46 AM

Certainly no chemist here but I did own an old antique boat where I had to paint the bottom of the hull that was saturated in engine oil. A local boat builder recommended I use acetone (outside ) and I did. I poured acetone on the inside and much to my surprise the oil started dripping from the underside of the hull and pooled on the top so I could remove the oil.

Having said that, …………. it sounds like an easy solution is to start over : ((

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

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