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Best way to build a mobile tool stand

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Forum topic by Craftsman70 posted 667 days ago 3210 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Craftsman70

241 posts in 724 days


667 days ago

I just picked up my first bandsaw ( a Ridgid BS1400 ) from craigslist, and its missing the base. I maybe overthinking this, but figured I’d hope to capitalize on someone else’s experience. What is the best way to build a mobile base? I figure I can either build a top and bottom square out of 2×4s and connect them with vertical 2x’s . Or I could build two right and left squares and connect them with horizontal 2x’s. Eitherway, I’d put 3/4 ply on top and bottom and casters on the bottom.

What do you guys recommend?


13 replies so far

View Charlie's profile

Charlie

1001 posts in 885 days


#1 posted 667 days ago

My planer sits on a cart I made. Same principle as you’re talking about. I made a pair of rectangles and connected them. However I made my rectangles AND the “legs” that connect them out of 1×4 stock. Believe me when I tell you it’s plenty strong. I used a piece of a solid core door I had for the top and plywood for the bottom and put casters on it. Before I ever put the planer on it I was standing on it to reach wood that was stored up high. (I weighed about 220 at the time) and it never even creaked. I wheel it out when I need it and wheel it into its parking spot when I don’t.

You can certainly use 2×4s if that’s what you have, but you don’t necessarily NEED 2×4s and lighter stock will work fine.
AH… my rectangles are top and bottom (not sides). Rectangle for top, rectangle for bottom, legs made of a 1×4 and a 1×3 joined to form a corner and glued/screwed to the inside corner of the rectangles. Done

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Craftsman70

241 posts in 724 days


#2 posted 667 days ago

Thanks Charlie, everything you did makes sense. I think I will use 1x for the top and bottom squares, but maybe use 2x for the legs rather than combining a 1×3 and a 1×4 to form an L. Would there be any negative to my doing that versus taking the time to make the L ?

View Charlie's profile

Charlie

1001 posts in 885 days


#3 posted 667 days ago

None that I can think of. Should work fine.
And if you hold your legs down 3/4 inch from the top of your top rectangle, you can drop a piece of 3/4 plywood down inside the rectangle. I did that on one of mine and used the corner legs as the main support and then screwed some cleats to the insides of the top rectangle so the plywood had a bearing surface the whole perimeter of the inside.
If you set the plywood on TOP of the top rectangle (in other words, the plywood top is cut larger than the top rectangle) then you don’t need the cleats. :) But your plywood edge is exposed. This really isn’t a big deal for a shop cart though. Kinda up to you.

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

1799 posts in 1830 days


#4 posted 667 days ago

I made a flip top stand for my planer and oscillating sander. It works great. Casters are 3 inch locking on all four corners.

I ripped 2x lumber to three inches, glue and screwed the whole thing together. It is built like a tank and solid as a rock.

Hope this helps.
Mike

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View toolie's profile

toolie

1717 posts in 1227 days


#5 posted 667 days ago

due to their height, 14” band saws wouldn’t, IMHO, be a suitable candidate for a flip top type of stand. too much weight of centerline as the tool is rotated from storage to operating position.

have you considered making the base out of 3/4” plywood and equipping it for storage? even if all it holds are band saw supplies, that’s space that doesn’t have to used elsewhere in the shop. something like this, only smaller and mounted on double locking casters:

even a five sided box made of 3/4” plywood would provide storage and stability for a 14” band saw.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View Tedstor's profile

Tedstor

1369 posts in 1231 days


#6 posted 667 days ago

I just slapped some threaded, locking casters on the ends of the legs and called it a day. I’ve been using it like that for a year now with no problems. The bandsaw only weighs 130ish lbs. I bought a $20 set of four casters from Lowes.

View Surfside's profile

Surfside

3040 posts in 772 days


#7 posted 667 days ago

Nice mobile base. I think you can put a small cabinet there to maximize the free space.

-- "someone has to be wounded for others to be saved, someone has to sacrifice for others to feel happiness, someone has to die so others could live"

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

1799 posts in 1830 days


#8 posted 667 days ago

“due to their height, 14” band saws wouldn’t, IMHO, be a suitable candidate for a flip top type of stand. too much weight of centerline as the tool is rotated from storage to operating position.”

I think you may have missed my point. I was showing how a sturdy stand can be made using 2x lumber instead of plywood. My planer and sander probably weight about 115-125# total, and the cart rolls easily so the band saw should fit nicely on a slightly shorter version and have room at the bottom for a drawer or cabinet.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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Craftsman70

241 posts in 724 days


#9 posted 667 days ago

I like the look and storage space of the plywood base, but I don’t want to take the time right now to build it. I think a 1x or 2x cart will be easiest for me to build with simple cuts from my miter saw. I may try the plywood version down the road. How did you attach your plywood, dados and glue, biscuits, or screws?

View cutworm's profile

cutworm

1060 posts in 1392 days


#10 posted 667 days ago

I have the BS1400. I just took the levelers off and installed 2” stem casters. 15 minutes, 20 bucks and you are done. I do plan on trying the Wood River retractable casters soon – budget allowing.
Just go by HF and pick up a tool stand and some casters.

-- Steve - "Never Give Up"

View Craftsman70's profile

Craftsman70

241 posts in 724 days


#11 posted 667 days ago

Actually, I tried the HF stand first, and found the ones they stock have open legs with no way to attach casters. They dont bother to put any type of foot on the leg.

View JarodMorris's profile

JarodMorris

165 posts in 974 days


#12 posted 667 days ago

Around here somewhere is a guy that made a mobile base for his bandsaw with pegboard and it accepts the output air from your shopvac and the tool floats on the air cushion like a hovercraft. Very cool. If I find the link, I’ll come back and post it.

-- Dad: Someone was supposed to pick up his toys! Son: My name isn't "Someone".

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toolie

1717 posts in 1227 days


#13 posted 666 days ago

mt_stringer….. thanks for clearing that up. i thought you were suggesting a revolving base for the BS. glad we’re on the same page.

craftsman70 …... for shop cabinets, i just screw them together with drywall screws after predrilling pilot holes. if i want extra strength, i’ll add dadoes or rabbets where needed. i try to refrain from glue on shop projects in th event i change my mind and want to re-purpose previously used parts.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

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