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BLO, Stain and Polly

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Forum topic by Grumpymike posted 670 days ago 1212 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Grumpymike

1000 posts in 913 days


670 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: oak finishing

I have an oak craftsman style table and I want the QS legs and unusual curly grain top to really pop. I have seen that alot of guys use BLO with great results, however we need to stain this piece to match other furniture color.
Do we stain then add BLO and finish with poly?? Or use the linseed oil, stain and polly?? or can you even use them ontop of each other like that??

-- Grumpy old guy, and lookin' good Doin' it.


21 replies so far

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

10387 posts in 1604 days


#1 posted 670 days ago

I think an oil based stain would work the best. General Finshes is some very solid stuff. I dont have any experience with dyes or stain over blo so cant comment on that angle.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

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CharlieM1958

15655 posts in 2816 days


#2 posted 670 days ago

+1 on what Chris said.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1385 posts in 959 days


#3 posted 670 days ago

Throw away the BLO; it’s only good for starting fires. Just stain and top with either oil or waterborne poly.

-- Clint Searl.............We deserve what we tolerate

View paratrooper34's profile

paratrooper34

760 posts in 1550 days


#4 posted 670 days ago

Mike, personally I cannot stand using any kind of stain on a project. Stains, in my opinion, change the natural color of the wood too much for my taste. I prefer to use oil finishes BLO, tung oil, etc and then once they dry, I use a paste wax such as Johnson’s. I really like the natural color of woods that I use on my projects and have no desire to color them artificially. If I had the piece that you describe above, that is exactly how I would finish it.

-- Mike

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CharlieM1958

15655 posts in 2816 days


#5 posted 670 days ago

Well there you go, Mike. It’s unanimous. LOL!

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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Fuzzy

289 posts in 2586 days


#6 posted 669 days ago

Clint … you are dead wrong on this … BLO is great for wheelbarrow/shovel/axe handles … other than that, I totally agree … the stuff is way more trouble than it is worth. There are way too many sane, predictable modern methods to coloring/enhancing wood to bother with that old crap my grandfather used, only to find out that it is a crapshoot … one time it looks OK … the next time .. YUCK !!

-- - dabbling in sarcasm is foolish … if you’re not proficient at it, you end up looking stupid … ... ...

View Grumpymike's profile

Grumpymike

1000 posts in 913 days


#7 posted 669 days ago

I agree with you guys that stain is not for beautiful wood … HOWEVER … you missed the point.
I have to match her other furniture color. In other words, this lady has a whole room full of matching furniture, and to add this table I gotta match it … all the other (production) stuff has a stain on it; I can match that. (it looks almost like ammonia fumed but it is a stain.)
I like the way that BLO makes the grain pop, then add a water based polly top coat. I have used tung oil with great success … and so on.
I was just asking in which order to apply the three … I think that I will do alot of test pieces and report back on how all this stuff that I should throw away and use for fire starters works out.
I thank you for your comments.

-- Grumpy old guy, and lookin' good Doin' it.

View nwbusa's profile

nwbusa

1016 posts in 884 days


#8 posted 669 days ago

The only time I’d use BLO to start a fire is if I was burning a trash can full of stains. :)

-- John, BC, Canada

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1756 days


#9 posted 669 days ago

Double post.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

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Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1756 days


#10 posted 669 days ago

I have never had success at matching another color with stain alone. Even if you knew all the pieces used the same stain, different woods and even different batches can cause a color disparity.

Dyes mixed in alcohol or water is a much better choice in that regard…sprayed on.

Oils enhance the natural contrast in the wood. You can achieve part of that same look with an oil based stain.

I would go that route, getting the color close with it, then fine tune the color with dye mixed with dewaxed shellac. Follows with a film finish of choice.

BTW, such a dyed mix is referred to an a “toner,” because it tones the wood to the desired shade.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

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Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1756 days


#11 posted 669 days ago

BTW, if you insist on BLO, I would do that first, follow by a shellac sealcoat, then the stain. I think that will allow the stain to do a better job of toning the without competing directly with the oil. Likewise, stains have pigment, which will block the oil, in part, from doing what you want the oil to do.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

1249 posts in 855 days


#12 posted 669 days ago

I agree with Jay. Oil, shellac then stain in that order. Mix the stain a little light, then apply repeatedly until you get the color you want. Be sure to allow the oil enough time to completely dry. HTH

-- Art

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1385 posts in 959 days


#13 posted 669 days ago

You guys with all the oil and shellac sure like to complicate a situation and create multiple opportunities for things to get screwed up. KISS (Keep it simple, Stupid)

-- Clint Searl.............We deserve what we tolerate

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Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1756 days


#14 posted 669 days ago

Matching color is not a simple task. What Grumpymike wants to do is a real life problem without the luxury of second chances. It might mean that he doesn’t get paid.

I too am from the KISS school of thought, but in this case KISS does not apply.

And BTW, oils are one of the best ways to make your projects really pop…I wouldn’t dismiss something like BLO so readily. In Mike’s case, popping the figure first with some BLO is easy. The shellac barrier is then very necessary…and also easy. It’s the third step that it tough…and that’s true no matter what you do beforehand.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View nwbusa's profile

nwbusa

1016 posts in 884 days


#15 posted 669 days ago

Clint, I guess we could all just start painting our projects to keep it simple…

-- John, BC, Canada

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