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edge routing...table or handheld? dust collection??

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Forum topic by amplifiednation posted 657 days ago 1520 views 0 times favorited 28 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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amplifiednation

22 posts in 682 days


657 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: router dust collection table round over handheld festool question shaping

I currently do a lot of work with round over bits on the edges of my speaker cab boxes. This is a huge creator of saw dust and flying chips in the shop, so I usually just do it outside and clean up after.

With the New England winter coming I need to move my routing inside. I’m trying to figure out which direction to go with the routing and need some advice. I didn’t have to worry about this last year because we didn’t get any snow!!

These boxes are sometimes as big as 28×21x12…is that too big to run through a router table?

If not too big…would a table with a dust port or dust extraction on the fence work well?

Or are my cabinet boxes too big to safely use a table? I’ve only done hand routing when it comes to the edge round overs but I would like to use a table if it will work.

If its just too dangerous or not recommended, there is a festool 1400 router for sale locally and its supposted to have great dust collection for hand held use

Any advice is appreciated.

Thx
Taylor

-- Taylor Cox www.amplifiednation.com


28 replies so far

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1277 days


#1 posted 657 days ago

Just my opinion, I’d say table with above and below dust collection. I don’t think you need something as robust as the Festool but if it’s in the budget, by all means go for it. You know, Festool has their own table now. OK, lets be frank, the Festool with paired extractor is going to collect the most dust. I doubt many will argue with that. If you’re selling cabs, it may be justified; just not for me.
.
I got a benchdog table extension and the over/under adapter from…heck…Rockler maybe? It does an admirable job of dust collecting with a necked 4 to 2 1/2” adapter. I don’t anticipate any problem with those long passes. However, I’m not so comfortable with plunge work. I’ve made long passes with a bearing’d roundover on the router table and it’s a breeze.
.
It may be secretly dangerous, heck if I know. If your table is large enough to support the piece and you’re not stepping for some reason. I vote table.
.
I’m really interested to see the responses below. Good luck!!!

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View NiteWalker's profile

NiteWalker

2631 posts in 1160 days


#2 posted 657 days ago

Yep. Router table with dust collection is my preferred way to handle roundovers.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

View amplifiednation's profile

amplifiednation

22 posts in 682 days


#3 posted 657 days ago

The investment will be about the same…Festool is only an option because of the dust collection. Actually the table will probably be cheaper.

I will be using bearing roundover bits. I currently use a fixed based D handle Bosch router and it works great., but the dust is too much!!

-- Taylor Cox www.amplifiednation.com

View Loren's profile

Loren

7153 posts in 2231 days


#4 posted 657 days ago

You can build a bigger router table easily. The work just needs
to be supported. It’s easier to get more dust with a table
than with an over-under shroud setup like a Festool.

You might look at doing it with a moulding head on the
table saw.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

3517 posts in 1951 days


#5 posted 657 days ago

I have a Benchdog RT and the fence collection system connected to my shop vac does a decent job particularly with round over bits.

But the trick to next to zero shavings is card board box below the RT but not to enclose the router tightly and cut off its cooling circulation.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10408 posts in 1274 days


#6 posted 657 days ago

My preference is always the router table when possible (safer, more stable, and dust collection. I built my 5’ long router table for less than $25 and it gets used daily (posted previously on LJ).

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1742 days


#7 posted 657 days ago

It’s all about the table size. You have to figure out what’s safe by trial and, hopefully, no error.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View amplifiednation's profile

amplifiednation

22 posts in 682 days


#8 posted 656 days ago

Overwhelming support for the table has my mind made up! Thanks to all.

So now do I build or buy?

-- Taylor Cox www.amplifiednation.com

View Gshepherd's profile

Gshepherd

1422 posts in 785 days


#9 posted 656 days ago

I would get some nice Birch plywood and put some wood edging on it and make the size to your needs…... you could use Phenolic plywood and it be a real slick surface….....

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

View amplifiednation's profile

amplifiednation

22 posts in 682 days


#10 posted 656 days ago

I have lot of birch ply…

I don’t have a lot of space in the shop… but I think a stand alone will be better than adding this into my 52” table saw

-- Taylor Cox www.amplifiednation.com

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

1224 posts in 841 days


#11 posted 656 days ago

If there are any variances in the edges of your boxes, they will affect your round over on a table, whereas using a hand held router will ride the waves, so to speak. You may not have this problem, but I do. This is why I use a Festool router for larger projects. It has near perfect dust collection.

Also, if you stop or slow down while feeding the box across the table you may get some burning. These are not roadblocks, but you do need to be aware and take steps to avoid/minimize these issues. HTH

-- Art

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1277 days


#12 posted 656 days ago

Art brings up some excellent points and I’ve experienced all of them. I’m trying to imagine a speaker cabinet with a lot of curves, but you may be the artist that I’m not.
.
Loren, what do you think about the totally enclosed housings (with vac below and above)? My fence/under shroud with a 3hp Triton works surprisingly well as long as I feed slowly. I’m not a Festool guy by any stretch, but I played with their table setup and I was shocked at the level of dust collection. The whole setup was really slick but slick costs.
.
In terms of build v. buy, you’re always going to better match your project building. My shop is tight, tight, so I went with a tablesaw wing. I’m very jealous of a 5’ router table; I wouldn’t be able to get around it in my shop;)

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View amplifiednation's profile

amplifiednation

22 posts in 682 days


#13 posted 656 days ago

Great stuff guys. I’m just becoming familiar with Festool products. It seems like they are very expensive and a bit controversial?

I have a Ryobi router table here i’m trying to get used to…but by the time i get the router set up i could already be done with my projects. I guess if i could set and forget then it would be beneficial.

When you set up the table with a roundover bit, do you line the fence up with the bit’s bearing, or do you let the workpiece ride through without support from the fence?

Some of my cabinets aren’t thick enough to accommodate a big bit like a 3/4” roundover, so i can see lining up the fence when that happens.

-- Taylor Cox www.amplifiednation.com

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1277 days


#14 posted 656 days ago

I’ve got a Skil benchtop router table that worked just fine. I certainly wasn’t suggesting that you run out and buy a Festool table. They’re simply very good quality tools with a price to match. As a hobbyist, I can’t justify them.
.
I never freehand stuff against the bearing, but that’s me. I spend an inordinate amount of time making sure the bearing turns while the workpiece is against the fence. There may be a better way but I like that feeling of stability.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View amplifiednation's profile

amplifiednation

22 posts in 682 days


#15 posted 656 days ago

That makes sense.. you can test with a scrap piece of wood pretty easily i would think?

-- Taylor Cox www.amplifiednation.com

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