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Forum topic by pvmsteve posted 672 days ago 3763 views 2 times favorited 35 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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pvmsteve

5 posts in 672 days


672 days ago

I will be purchasing the bench dog Pro Max cast iron router table (40-102) to put on my Ridgid table saw ( R4512)I need some input as to which router would be best. I want to be able to adjust the depth and also change bits from the top of the router table. Also which is the best side to mount it on the saw. Thanks for any advice.


35 replies so far

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6914 posts in 1509 days


#1 posted 672 days ago

All of the Triton Routers have their own lifting mechanism, and that alone can save you up to a couple hundred$$. I had to drill the crank hole but other than that it is a straight forward mounting process.


NOTE: The fence is in “storage position” NOT used in that orientation.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View NiteWalker's profile

NiteWalker

2695 posts in 1172 days


#2 posted 672 days ago

Milwaukee 5625-20 or porter cable 7518.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

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Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1753 days


#3 posted 672 days ago

I have the Milwaukee 5625. It’s a monster. I use it in a lift, but if too can be raised through the table like Mike’s Triton. Highly recommended.

I also have the Pro Max extension on my Unisaw. It’s just terrific. I use mine on the left side to provide greater accessability and an extended work area.

The right side is a logical location as well, but it doesn’t really extend the working areas if you have something like a rolling cart/storage already built in at the right hand side, which I do.

I don’t like the router access on that side; however, most TS fences can do double-duty there…so that’s a positive aspect. I have an Incra TSLS fence, so I can just slide mine over to use it with the router as well. Likewise, you might not care about that since the Pro Max comes with an excellent fence in its own regard.

That said, much of the position will be dictated by the TS motor. On a left-tilting saw, you might have no choice than to put it on the right side. My Unisaw is right-tilting. Unless I put it way out on the rail (you wouldn’t do that with the Benchdog), it would hit the TS motor cover.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6914 posts in 1509 days


#4 posted 672 days ago

Jay,
Have you compared your self-lifting mechanism with you “purchased” lift?

If so, can you share some detailed impressions and/or measurements?

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5363 posts in 1970 days


#5 posted 672 days ago

The Tritons and Freuds have the most topside features, and allow easy one handed bit changes from above the table level….you don’t need to remove the inserts, or use a bent wrench, or reach below to activate the height lock,etc.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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pvmsteve

5 posts in 672 days


#6 posted 672 days ago

Thanks for the responce, I will check out the Triton Routers, Mike where would be a good source for that router

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6914 posts in 1509 days


#7 posted 671 days ago

I found one of mine at WoodCraft, the other online. If you go online you have a better chance of finding the best price, though if I recall correctly pricing seems to fluctuate in tandem across the board.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1288 days


#8 posted 671 days ago

I’m with Horizontal with the big Triton. I had to drill a hole in my plate for the lift mechanism. I’ve been really happy with mine and I even added a cheap digital depth meter.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View josephf's profile

josephf

52 posts in 691 days


#9 posted 671 days ago

Those who own the triton -how much do you use them . Bought one a few years back .Inexpensive and the router came with all types of extra’s . I immediately had trouble with the lift ,only plastic parts .after the second time the lift broke i added a Router Raiser .they work well . It’s a plastic case router so the deflection under load makes sense . Limits the cut depth and bit size . It was smoking the other day ,thought it was a goner , but it is still working ready for the cabinet door job next week . I have roughly 10 routers two always under a table and a third that is sometimes under a table . I think it is an inexpensive router that is a -”get what you pay for item” .I would not buy another .

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1753 days


#10 posted 671 days ago

No, I haven’t tried that, Mike. I went straight from a Rockler FX lift/Bosch 1617 setup to the Woodpeckers PRLv2/Milwaukee 5625 setup. I certainly wanted the larger router, but I also wanted to upgrade from the Rockler lift because I never could get the backlash worked out of it…and I thought it was a little sloppy in terms of rigidity and would often slip in its height adjustment during a cut.

I didn’t even give soloing the 5625 a thought. I would test it now, but I don’t necessarily want to purchase a new plate just to perform that experiment.

I love the PRLv2 chiefly because it handles the big Milwaukee so well. Mine is also coupled to a Wixey Digital, and that works pretty precisely with the height adjustment…so there’s a lot of accuracy in getting to the right bit height quickly. But the best part about the lift is that I don’t have to crank it for bit changes and when “rough setting” the height. I just use the quick wrench. This is REALLY important for me because my router is on an extension wing of my table saw. It makes for much faster transitioning between router mode and table saw mode…which isn’t a big deal until you actually have to do it.

The question that most people have is, “Is the lift worth it?” For me, yes. Mostly because of both accuracy and speed of setup…simultaneously. Without the lift, you might be able to have both, but not at the same time. But with a good set of setup blocks or hand-held digital height gauges, then you can certainly do accurate work as long as there’s no play in the system. You don’t want it moving during a cut, either by flexure or in its adjustments.

I do have concerns about the rigidity of the plunge mechanism on a router as compared to the beefy structure of a good lift. I have no foundation for that conjecture other than a feeling, but I knew I’d be spinning a large panel-raising bit so I didn’t want to take a chance on that.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

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Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1753 days


#11 posted 671 days ago

Oh, and I believe you’d have to drop the motor to do bit changes on the Milwaukee when used in a table with its plunge base. I wouldn’t want to do that, especially since I knew I’d have it in an enclosure.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6914 posts in 1509 days


#12 posted 671 days ago

@josephf,
If you are not aware of this, TRITON upgraded the lifting worm on their routers some time ago. I actually reviewed that upgrade here:
http://lumberjocks.com/reviews/1983

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1288 days


#13 posted 671 days ago

Josephf, I’ve abused mine pretty throughly. Like Sniper, I also had the big Freud until someone stole it. I replaced it with a Speedmatic that I like a bit less. The Freud also comes on sale pretty often.
.
Back to Josephf, the Triton setup will never compete with a Woodpecker or Jessum. Mine has a little bit of slop and I don’t like having to reach under the table to lock it. I don’t really use the above the table feature much b/c when I crouch down, the digital display is right in front of me. I just raise it where I want and wiggle it a big before locking. The power is there and the variable speed is nice. Not too screamingly loud either. I just don’t believe it’ll ever compete with a big PC motor-only and a quality raiser, but the price is definitely right.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1288 days


#14 posted 671 days ago

Mike brings up a good point; you must upgrade the worm. And don’t forget to take out the plunge spring; I didn’t for the longest time.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View EEngineer's profile

EEngineer

885 posts in 2208 days


#15 posted 671 days ago

Another vote for Woodpecker quick lift technology!

I have the old Quicklift 420. They didn’t have the PRL when I bought my router lift. You simply cannot believe the convenience of this feature until you use it on a couple of projects with multiple bit changes.

And you cannot beat Woodpecker quality and finish. I have had this lift for going on 5 years now and it has worked flawlessly. Not production, just weekend warrior hobbiest duty but it has had pretty constant use.

“Is the lift worth it?” You betcha! No, plunge routers with only a crank don’t compare.

-- "Find out what you cannot do and then go do it!"

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