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Forum topic by Charlie posted 09-07-2012 04:41 PM 1847 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Charlie

1100 posts in 1747 days


09-07-2012 04:41 PM

I have a couple of Onsrud blades. A 60 tooth I use for crosscuts and plywood. And a combination blade I’ve used for ripping or for cutting 2×4s and stuff.

I’d like to get a dedicated ripping blade, but haven’t got that far yet.

Questions:
Lately it seems my blades are getting pitchy kinda fast. I’ve been cleaning them with Simple Green. It seems to work real well. I just ordered some CMY 2050 to see if it has any advantage over the Simple Green.

Do you coat your blades with anything after cleaning them? Do you wax them?
I just bought some G96 gun treatment for the cast iron on my new jointer. I’m wondering if I should spray some on blades that don’t get used as often.

How often do you find yourself cleaning your table saw blade? For me… for the crosscut blade… this is the 2nd time in a week. I’ve been cutting mostly plywood, maple, some walnut and some pine, but not a lot of pine. I cut all the plywood for our kitchen cabinets AND all of the maple for the face frames and also cut the walnut for 2 small countertops and didn’t have a pitch or resin problem. Now it seems to build up really fast.

Lastly… I don’t see an Onsrud glue line rip blade on eBay right now. Is there a nice saw blade out there that doesn’t break the bank? Those Onsrud blades have spoiled me for pricing. :)

thanks!


9 replies so far

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7208 posts in 2836 days


#1 posted 09-07-2012 05:45 PM

I clean my blades fairly often…better clean than a little dirty. If you clean them often, they’re easier to clean….I suspect that you’ll find that the Simple Green (or 409, Fantastic, Totally Awesome, Greased Lightning, etc) work about as well as the aftermarket specialty cleaners. I don’t spray anything on my blades after the fact, but I’ve heard Topcote is good…be sure not to get something that’s silicone based.

Your combination blade should provide glue ready cuts in materials up to ~ 1.5 to maybe 1.75”. You’ll want a lower tooth count blade for thicknesses much over that. The 30T “Glue Line” rip blades will do a nice job, but many aren’t recommended for materials over 1”, so you’re really not gaining any capabilities that you don’t already have. A good 24T FTG ripper will have an easier time in materials over 1.5”. The better ones are capable of a glue ready edge, but don’t expect them to be as smooth as a cut from a 30T GLR, or 40T or 50T general purpose blade. The better 24T rippers are the Freud LU87 (thin kerf – TK), Freud LM72, Infinity 010-024 or 010-124 (TK), CMT 201.024.10 or 202.024.10 (TK). The Irwin Marples 24T TK ripper and DeWalt DW7124PT are also respectable TK rippers.

The Forrest WWII 30T is available in both full and thin kerf, and is very capable of glue ready edges in materials in the 2” range, plus will even crosscut reasonably well, but @ ~ $90, it’s not quite the bargain you got with your Onsruds.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4853 posts in 2274 days


#2 posted 09-07-2012 05:50 PM

Try the purple colored Simple Green. It works great, and won’t erode the carbide over time like the regular Simple Green can.
Pitch buildup tells me your blade is getting hot and burning the wood. Are you seing black marks on your cuts? If so I would recommend a Freud Diablo 24 tooth rip(Home Depot). They are cheap, and last a long time.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Charlie's profile

Charlie

1100 posts in 1747 days


#3 posted 09-07-2012 06:23 PM

Cleaned with Simple Green. Blade looked great. Started cutting some walnut…. about an inch thick… and after a couple of short cuts, maybe 8 inches each, the blade was loading up already. Gummy crap in the teeth. I’m using a slow, but steady feed rate since the material is thick and…. well… it’s walnut. I am getting burn marks in some cuts, but it SEEMS like this only happens after the blade starts to get gummy. Problem is it’s getting gummed up pretty quick. Maybe I’m not rinsing off the Simple Green? That’s why I asked about coating after cleaning. Seems once I cleaned them I can’t KEEP them clean. They build up right away.

I’ve rechecked alignments. Blade to miter slot is within .002. Miter slot to fence, the fence tails away from the blade at the trailing end by about 1/32. Rechecked riving knife alignment and it’s in line with the blade as it should be.

I can’t imagine I’ve worn out 2 blades already. At the price of the Onsrud blades on eBay, it’s cheaper to buy another one than to have these sharpened :)

Almost seems like the Simple Green is making the blades sticky. I’ll try cleaning again, but I’ll rinse them off better and maybe give ‘em a shot of G96 or something just to see if it’s my simple green technique being goofy. :)

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11806 posts in 3149 days


#4 posted 09-07-2012 07:57 PM

Don’t forget that the Simple Green is a concentrated product and you will need to rinse them off longer than you might think to remove all traces of the product. Avoid the Original Simple Green , and use the newer Purple flavor….it doesn’t harm the carbide like the original formula does.
Are you pushing the wood too slowly , causing excessive heat to build up ?
I don’t know how much plywood you’ve cut , but the glues in it can dull your blades faster than plain wood.

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View Charlie's profile

Charlie

1100 posts in 1747 days


#5 posted 09-07-2012 08:18 PM

Pretty sure it was due to me not rinsing the Simple Green off. Cleaned the blade(s) again and hosed ‘em off real good after. Then took them in the shop and dried them and then shot them with some G96. Just a little, and wiped the blades down.

They FELT better. Cut a few passes on the walnut again and no problems. So apparently, if you don’t get all the Simple Green off, it makes the gummy crap build up quicker… hehehe.

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

3256 posts in 1695 days


#6 posted 09-08-2012 02:25 AM

I have used a WWII blade since I bought it in 1980 every day in my shop cutting thousands of linear feet each year of all thicknesses up to 3”. It is the only blade I use. I have a triple chip for the occasional laminate, but the WWII does a better job. It has been cleaned once, when it was sharpened in 2001. It gets an occasional waxing with Carnuba wax (Lundmarks paste is largely Carnuba.) It still makes clean cuts (glue ready) in difficult woods like cherry and walnut without burn marks, rip and crosscut. I make the cuts as rapidly as the blade will take them without strain. The current saw has a 3 hp motor and the previous one was a 1.5 hp. Needless to say the 3 hp makes faster cuts possible with less chance to burn. When I re-read this it sounds like I’m trying to rush the cuts, but that is not the case. I “feel” what the machine is capable of and respect that. Just before I sent it in for resharpening, it was beginning to leave hints of heat buildup. They offered and I accepted a regrind that greatly reduced the power it takes to make the same cuts. I don’t know just what they changed but it was slick.
Having said all that, now let’s sit down over coffee and compare TCO (total cost of ownership).
Dan

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com There are three types of people...those who are good at math and those who aren't.

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

2566 posts in 1718 days


#7 posted 09-08-2012 04:28 AM

Dan, I agree. My WWII blade has been great. However, I must be doing something wrong because I need to get mine sharpened about every 3-4 years. :)

-- Art

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4853 posts in 2274 days


#8 posted 09-08-2012 04:34 AM

It is not the simple green. It is heat buildup from the combination blade. Full kerf combination blades are even worse. I’m telling you a $30 freud thin kerf rip blade will solve your problems. Keep the combo blade for flat-bottom joinery cuts.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

3256 posts in 1695 days


#9 posted 09-08-2012 05:41 AM

Common oversights that contribute heavily to shortened blade life:
1. cutting dirty stuff. Grit from carelessly handled lumber or used lumber is a killer.
2. cutting sanded stuff. Abrasive particles imbedded by sanding produce a surprising amount of wear.
3. cutting too slowly. Heat buildup is not good, even for carbide. In severe cases, it fractures microscopically continuing and accelerating the heat cycle.
4. handling during blade changes and storage. ANY BUMP on a sharp carbide point or edge will break it like glass.
5. cutting materials other than wood and some wood streaked with ground minerals. Some magazines show brass or aluminum being cut. NOT WITH MY GOOD WWII! Plastic laminates and resin bonded floor sweepings are abrasive.
I’ve had such good success with CLEAN (as in like new) metal waxed here and there. I’ve cut a lot of green pine without noticeable pitch adhesion. Am about to do another 1000 bd ft. of it. A riving knife helps a lot preventing heat buildup on the cutters by keeping the pinch off the blade.
Dan

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com There are three types of people...those who are good at math and those who aren't.

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