LumberJocks

Gap in glued joint

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by sphayden posted 693 days ago 1437 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View sphayden's profile

sphayden

25 posts in 891 days


693 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: glue joint

When the glue-up of my bed footboard dried I saw that the backside on one corner did not close and left about 1/8” gap in that area. Should I / Can I fill it with something?


22 replies so far

View derosa's profile

derosa

1532 posts in 1438 days


#1 posted 693 days ago

Take sawdust from the same wood if possible, might have to saw up scrap and mix it with glue to fill in the gap. If possible you could also try ripping the joint on the table saw and gluing it up if you just have one solid glue up.

-- --Rev. Russ in NY-- A posse ad esse

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

4752 posts in 1180 days


#2 posted 693 days ago

+1 for Derosa on the sawdust and glue blend.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6915 posts in 1517 days


#3 posted 693 days ago

I think either of Russ’ suggestion will work depending on the severity of the crack:

  • Is the crack so bad as to be a structural problem?—Rip & re-glue
  • Is the crack purely cosmetic?—Fill

You will have to decide just how bad that crack/separation is.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3051 posts in 1278 days


#4 posted 693 days ago

The glue and sawdust will not stain like the wood so if the gap is in a place where it will be seen then you might consider that. If I could I would rip it and gl;ue it again. Did you use a jointer to true the edges and did you make certain you kept the wood against the fence on the jointer? Just brainstorming.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6915 posts in 1517 days


#5 posted 693 days ago

If you go the rip&glue route, then using either a biscuit or floating tenon would be best, if you have that ability/equipment. Or even a couple of dowels.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112001 posts in 2180 days


#6 posted 693 days ago

If you feel you joint is solid and you have no structural problems,then I would use a small piece of the same wood with the grain running the same direction and glue it in place. If you can avoid getting glue on the out side of your shim the stain will match much better.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View sphayden's profile

sphayden

25 posts in 891 days


#7 posted 692 days ago

Thanks for the ideas. This is a picture of the gap. It is on the footboard cap. One side is flush, but the other did not sit flush when I glued it. Maybe I could carve out some of the glue in the area that is not flush and pull it back down with a clamp.

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

1262 posts in 860 days


#8 posted 692 days ago

You might be able to saw out the excess wood/glue with a flush cut saw. Then pull it down with a clamp and hold it in place with a couple “decorative” dowel pins of the same or contrasting wood. Of course, you will need to add the pins to the other 3 posts as well. HTH

-- Art

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112001 posts in 2180 days


#9 posted 692 days ago

Now that I see a photo my earlier idea would not work.depending on you joinery,you can try too force it up and risk breaking the leg or the cap or you can saw the cap off by cutting the joinery between the leg and the cap or just plan on making a new cap and saw down the middle of the cap and make a new one. If the corners were not round you could have added some trim all the way around the leg and hide the crack.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View derosa's profile

derosa

1532 posts in 1438 days


#10 posted 692 days ago

For something like that I would make a sled that would hold the footboard perpendicular to the saw blade and rip the top off. Try to get a nice clean cut on the top of the footboard, you shouldn’t need to worry about height so the loss of the footboard is best and will give a clean flat surface to reglue, and either clean the bottom of your current top piece though the planer or make a new one. If you rip through the footboard then you’ll be able to just clean the top piece and not lose any real thickness there.

edit:
Relooking at the pic it appears that the post is angled at the top, the back edge has the surface flat while the front edge doesn’t and the rail appears mostly flat but maybe that post back edge isn’t quite flush and pushes the top piece up very slightly as it appears there is a tiny gap that forms under the cap towards the post. Someone below mentions trim and that may be the quickest, easiest and maybe prettier solution. If not definitely rip the top off on the saw for one straight edge all the way across to get the new top to sit the same the whole way. Although clamps shouldn’t be used to force a piece into place I now have a policy of waiting very close to the full 24 hours to make sure that what may be a slightly less then perfect fits stays put.

-- --Rev. Russ in NY-- A posse ad esse

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

4752 posts in 1180 days


#11 posted 692 days ago

Put a decorative trim around the perimeter.

View Prplhrtjarhead's profile

Prplhrtjarhead

80 posts in 709 days


#12 posted 692 days ago

Like someone else mentioned, just brainstorming…but it looks to me like a glue up problem.

Were your clamps straight and centered during the initial glue up?

Might not be necessary these days, but I always alternate my clamps when gluing up, one on the front side, then the back, repeating the whole length of a piece. Like I said, maybe that’s old fashioned or out of favor with the better glues/clamps available these days. But it is how I learned and it has never failed me.

Not trying or intending to insult; though sawing, joinery and other processes may be the culprit, clamping can be just as big an issue, and an often overlooked one. Uneven pressure can cause just this type of separation.

Good to get ideas to fix it, but better to understand all the possible causes too.

Good luck on an otherwise nice looking piece from what can be seen.

-- "We'll preserve for our children this, the last best hope of man on earth, or we'll sentence them to take the last step into a thousand years of darkness." R. Reagan, "The Speech", 1964

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3051 posts in 1278 days


#13 posted 692 days ago

This is a tough job. Thanks for the photos. I still think I would try to cut it and either reglue or make new parts to join. Anything less will be a patch. Ask yourself how happy you will be in a year or 5 years if you leave this less than perfect or less than the best you are capable of doing. As mentioned above you need to analyze this and try to not let it happen again. You had a nice project going. Like Derosa suggested a sled might be used to hold the piece straight and secure for cutting. It will be difficult to hold this straight.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6915 posts in 1517 days


#14 posted 691 days ago

@AandCstyle said: You might be able to saw out the excess wood/glue with a flush cut saw. Then pull it down with a clamp and hold it in place with a couple “decorative” dowel pins of the same or contrasting wood.

I think you may be on to something here. This would add some meat to a weakened butt joint (once you have flushcut the top piece free). I would use a large dowel size, drill down through both top and leg after the butt joint has dried, drive a glue covered dowel and a cap of your choice of knob or finial. This way you can make look like it was planned that way from the beginning.

ETC.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

1262 posts in 860 days


#15 posted 691 days ago

A refinement would be to countersink a couple screws to hold it in place, then put plugs over the screws. I think this would hold better than a dowel.

-- Art

showing 1 through 15 of 22 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase